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The DC Comics Encyclopedia

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Featuring the likes of Superman, Batman, The Joker and Catwoman, this book profiles all of DC Comics' superheroes and super-villains. It includes brand-new artwork of some of DC's most famous characters, as well as recalling famous storylines and battles.


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Featuring the likes of Superman, Batman, The Joker and Catwoman, this book profiles all of DC Comics' superheroes and super-villains. It includes brand-new artwork of some of DC's most famous characters, as well as recalling famous storylines and battles.

30 review for The DC Comics Encyclopedia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    DC Comics at its best! IT'S A BIRD! IT'S A PLANE! IT'S AN ENCYCLOPEDIA! Obviously, in an ever-changing environment like comics, any encyclopedia is outdated almost when it comes out... ...but that never stopped us to buy them! Definitely, any avid comic books' reader needs such companion books, not only to reaffirm what one knows about our chosen comic book characters and titles, but also to have a fair understanding about the whole universe of the publishing house, in this case, DC Comics DC Comics at its best! IT'S A BIRD! IT'S A PLANE! IT'S AN ENCYCLOPEDIA! Obviously, in an ever-changing environment like comics, any encyclopedia is outdated almost when it comes out... ...but that never stopped us to buy them! Definitely, any avid comic books' reader needs such companion books, not only to reaffirm what one knows about our chosen comic book characters and titles, but also to have a fair understanding about the whole universe of the publishing house, in this case, DC Comics. Everything started, back then, when DC Comics wasn't even one single company, but actually several independent publications like Action Comics, Detective Comics, Sensational Comics and many others, but not matter when DC Comics was formed, they still got some other publication companies into the herd like Fawcett Comics, along with others... ...introducing the first superhero, in fact, due Superman was named like that, it's because this kind of characters are called superheroes... ...also due the success in sales of Superman, it's that Batman, the most popular comic book character was conceived to compete in sales... ...and of course, the first female superheroine, and still the most popular of all, Wonder Woman... ...DC Comics defined the Golden Age of Comics and even many campy elements of that good ol' era are hard to die, and many fans still enjoy the appealing of a simpler and charmer time, when the superhero was good and the villain was evil, without those complicated layers of the contemporary storytelling with ambivalent characters and decisions... ...but the Golden Age had to die if DC Comics wanted to keep selling comic books so... ...several heroes got into a complete overhauling like Green Lantern, The Flash, Hawkman and the Atom, giving birth to the Silver Age of Comics... ...also some villains got teeth like The Joker, and even totally new villains risen like Ra's al Ghul... ...however, since the Golden Age characters were hard to die, they become a parallel dimension, Earth-2, giving birth to the Infinite Earths... ...after that the Comic Book Age turned into a blurred zone where not everybody agree in the same concepts, therefore, to some there are a Bronze Age and now a Modern Age, to others the Bronze Age never existed, and even some argue that there must be yet another era after Bronze and before the current Modern one... ...but what nobody can't deny is that once the Silver Age died, things got grittier... ...a Swamp Things gave birth to a whole new divisions of comics, enabling demon fighter and lords of dream to rise... ...Robin became a legacy of several holders of the name, some falling, others taking new names... ...we were witness of the future where The Dark Knight Returns... ...Superman died against an unstopabble monster... ...Batman got broken his back and another took the mantle... ...still wondering who watches The Watchmen... ...Earths died, Earths lived, and nothing would be the same! This is the DC Universe and here is the ultimate guide to all its characters and iconic moments in the history of comic books.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Randy Lander

    Now that's what I'm talking about. For the longest time, I've bemoaned the seeming inability of DC or Marvel to capture the glory that lay in their guidebooks to their respective universes, the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe and DC Who's Who. Given today's lax continuity approach, they're not necessary (if they ever were), but it is still frustrating to see them replaced by half-assed versions like Marvel's Encyclopedias or current flimsy pamphlets trying to pass as the Handbooks, or D Now that's what I'm talking about. For the longest time, I've bemoaned the seeming inability of DC or Marvel to capture the glory that lay in their guidebooks to their respective universes, the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe and DC Who's Who. Given today's lax continuity approach, they're not necessary (if they ever were), but it is still frustrating to see them replaced by half-assed versions like Marvel's Encyclopedias or current flimsy pamphlets trying to pass as the Handbooks, or DC's bizarre hybrid Secret Files. Really, half the knowledge I have about the obscure characters of the DC and Marvel Universes, and thus much of my love of those universes (universi?) comes from having read the Who's Who and Official Handbook back in the day. And so it is that I would like to announce my desire to give the authors of this book a big, wet, sloppy (virtual) kiss for bringing back the truly awesome encyclopedia to the DC universe with this exhaustive, beautifully illustrated hardcover tome. If you are a DC comics fan, or just a superhero fan in general, this one is for you. The biggest misstep that has been made with the new attempts at this kind of project by DC and Marvel has been their limited scope. Rather than trying to cover their entire universe, they focus in on the characters that everyone already knows. Really, who needs a book on Spider-Man and the Green Goblin? Every five-year-old who saw the movie knows their deal. It's not that I want the big guys skipped over, but the real job of an encyclopedia or secret files or handbook or what-have-you is to include a sense of the universe, of just how many characters there are and how they relate. On this score, DC Comics Encylopedia shoots big and scores big. These creators have covered everyone from the modern-day big guns to the golden age greats, and tossed in any number of obscure characters from the '70s, '80s, '90s and beyond. If you look really really really hard, you can find some omissions, like Erik Larsen-designed Superman/Suicide Squad baddie Shrapnel, but you won't find any major omissions, and you will be astounded by the number of smaller characters who are represented. I know I was. I could go on and on about this, but let me just give you a few examples of who is covered in here. '80s private dick Nathaniel Dusk. I... Vampire. The Action Comics Weekly version of the Secret Six. Cameron Chase, from the late lamented '90s series Chase. The Hayoth, one of the coolest teams from the '90s Suicide Squad. Individual entries for 2002's Power Company. And on and on and on. For a fan of DC's more out there or obscure heroes, there is nothing better than these books, which seeks not to ignore (like so many creators today) or degrade (like the big event books of 2004) but to catalog, to shine a spotlight on them. They say "every character is someone's favorite," but too few people actually buy into that and give equal respect to all characters as the creators of this Encyclopedia have. The last thing I want to do, though, is to give the impression that this is strictly focused on comics obscura. No, the really big guys get gorgeous two-page spreads that detail their history, notable story events, who they are and what they do. There are standouts, like the beautiful page for Starman that serves as a loving tribute to James Robinson's series and what he did for the legacy of that character, and then there are the expected spotlights like a nifty two-page spread on Superman. There are even some cool two-page spreads focused on other stuff that makes the DC Universe cool, like Vehicles, Bases, Weapons, Alien Races, Great Team-Ups, Romantic Moments, Great Battles and Strange Times and Places. All of this information is packed into amazingly well-designed pages that appears modern without being cluttered. The book is a treasure of graphic design, and it is packed to the gills with great art. Unlike the modern-day Marvel Universe handbooks, which seem to forget all artists before the past five years and weirdly bring in different peopple to draw feet or hands on panel shots grabbed from different comics, the guys who chose the art for the DC Encyclopedia have done a phenomenal job. Work by a variety of legendary artists from a variety of eras is to be found here, and somehow they've picked perfectly for 90% of the characters in here. There are pinups drawn from both eras of DC Who's Who as well as art taken from comics dating from the Golden Age through just the last couple of months. The characters who get larger entries, which includes a lot of them, even get some well-chosen panels showing them in action. Even if the info and the writing weren't so strong, this book would be worthwhile as a visual catalog of the DC Universe. I can't properly credit the artists who are involved in this book, as it takes a full page at the back of the page to do that. I would like to single out the writers who put this whole thing together, a mind-bending task that I can't even fathom trying to do with this kind of skill. Scott Beatty has previously worked on the DK Books Ultimate guides for DC characters (as well as writing Batman, Green Arrow and plenty of others for DC) but this is a huge step up in terms of information, and he has come through with flying colors. Bob Greenberger is one of those names who has been around as continuity cop and production guy at DC and Marvel for a long time, and his presence here is unsurprising, but definitely welcome. Phil Jimenez is probably best known for his loving stories and art on Tempest, Teen Titans and Wonder Woman, and he brings that same sheer joy and work ethic to this book. Dan Wallace is the only guy whose previous credits I don't know, but it's quite clear he can hold his own, and these four men, each bringing a different expertise, have truly created something spectacular. That they had a design department equal to their writing skills is, in these days of disappointing guidebooks, a small miracle as well. I already mentioned the strong graphic design, but let me also point out that this book has that indispensable (and often overlooked) feature that a book like this absolutely needs: a kickass index. It is clear that everyone, from writing to design to editorial, has put their heart and soul into this, and to them I offer a hearty thank you. To DC and comics fans everywhere, I offer a strong suggestion that you seek this book out, as it should be on every superhero fan's bookshelf. And to DC and Marvel editorial, what can I say? You guys just got schooled.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stella Chen

    I found this less like a go to encyclopedia but more of a display piece. Every page was just so beautiful that I couldn't stifle my fangirling squeals. It's nice to discover new characters and relive your favourite heroes and villains' moments. I did find that some information were lacking but I just can't give this less than 5 stars because of its beauty and the aura it gives off. With the Internet being a faster and more updated sorce of knowledge, this will soon become obsolete, but I don't c I found this less like a go to encyclopedia but more of a display piece. Every page was just so beautiful that I couldn't stifle my fangirling squeals. It's nice to discover new characters and relive your favourite heroes and villains' moments. I did find that some information were lacking but I just can't give this less than 5 stars because of its beauty and the aura it gives off. With the Internet being a faster and more updated sorce of knowledge, this will soon become obsolete, but I don't care. I'll just lay this out oh my coffee table and gaze at it everyday.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sack

    This is probably a review people who know me have been waiting for for a long time. I often rant on how Marvel is better than DC with no actual backing information. Then I, as I like to put it, read up on the enemy. I have a list composed below, and it's got convincing evidence. I must note that this list is not supposed to be in any particular order. LIST!!!!! 1) PLOT LINES. No 'hero' gets killed. Definitely not the major ones. Also, the whole 'my parents died' backstory is probably the on This is probably a review people who know me have been waiting for for a long time. I often rant on how Marvel is better than DC with no actual backing information. Then I, as I like to put it, read up on the enemy. I have a list composed below, and it's got convincing evidence. I must note that this list is not supposed to be in any particular order. LIST!!!!! 1) PLOT LINES. No 'hero' gets killed. Definitely not the major ones. Also, the whole 'my parents died' backstory is probably the only used backstory for any heavy hitters of DC. Take Superman, Batman, Robin, Flash, and a lot more for instance. They've used that story close to a billion times, and still expect sympathy from the readers. 2) NAMES. There are approximately 800 different versions of each character. All DC changes is the gender/age based suffix at the end. There is even a dog version of both Batman AND Superman. What's next... A turtle? The prefixes are problematic as well. There are about 15 characters whose names start with 'Mister.' 3) GEOGRAPHY. There is no landscape. No map of where everything is. Where is Gotham City? It's where Gotham City is. 4) TIME TRAVEL. I hate time travel. End of story. How is this a valid part of this review? It's in because DC has time travel. And a pretty terrible explanation behind it too. Marvel has no time travel. Characters only travel to alternate universes without changing their own through time travel. 5) LABELS. This is one of the things that is most annoying. Everyone is either good or evil. The bad guys even know that they are bad guys. No one does that in real life. Oh, I want to be an evil dude when I grow up. Completely unrealistic. There are no mercenaries or anti-heroes or just regular old people. They always have to have some designated category and powers. 6) VARIETY. This meaning character variety. I noticed this while going through this book, there is perhaps one African American of actual importance. Also, women are literally just eye candy/motivators. Look in Lois Lane's section and all you find is the extended version of "She likes Superman." Women have actual personalities, thank you very much. 7) RIP-OFFS. There are lots. It's fun going through and pointing out some stuff. It's also funny that DC has a character called Captain Marvel. DC rips-off it's own stuff too. 8) GROUPS. Another excuse, other than cross-overs, to put all the heavy hitters in one book. Also, the names of these things are terrible. It's like they are trying to come up with the most ways to put League and Justice in team names. 9) STORIES. Their theory is: Read one, read them all. After you read one crime-bust, you don't need to read anymore. I'm pretty sure they stick to the same formula every time and just change the variables. 10) Finally... BOOK. I mean this book because the layout is kinda poor, I can't tell where one ends and whose image belongs where, and the large sections. By this I mean those side-by-side pages that show something lame like 'Team-Ups' rather than actual events or something. Maybe they don't have any. I henceforth conclude my list, and my rant as well. I hope this brings to light some interesting points, and I shall sign off now. Excelsior!

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This book is an essential addition to any comic book fan's library.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daniel A.

    The DC Comics Encyclopedia: The Definitive Guide to the Characters of the DC Universe mostly served to remind me why I've basically given up reading mainstream comics, at least from the so-called "Big Two", and certainly new ones from the "Big Two". Compiled by veteran comics professionals Scott Beatty, Robert Greenberger (Goodreads' entry for this title is incorrect in listing his name as Greenburger), and Phil Jimenez, along with DK Publishing's specialist Daniel Wallace, The DC Comics Encyclopedia is exactly what it purports to be: A more-or-lessGreenbrger), The DC Comics Encyclopedia: The Definitive Guide to the Characters of the DC Universe mostly served to remind me why I've basically given up reading mainstream comics, at least from the so-called "Big Two", and certainly new ones from the "Big Two". Compiled by veteran comics professionals Scott Beatty, Robert Greenberger (Goodreads' entry for this title is incorrect in listing his name as Greenburger), and Phil Jimenez, along with DK Publishing's specialist Daniel Wallace, The DC Comics Encyclopedia is exactly what it purports to be: A more-or-less comprehensive catalog of the overwhelming majority of characters (plus some significant events, objects, etc.) published by DC Comics, at least as of 2008. But therein lies some of the problem; the whole endeavor feels somewhat self-referential, very self-congratulatory, and quite as if DC Comics/Time Warner (DC's parent company) feels as if we comics aficionados are really easy to please. This isn't to say that there isn't some real positive benefit to The DC Comics Encyclopedia; absent a significant update of DC's classic Who's Who series from the 1980s—which I greatly enjoyed, and akin to which Marvel has published Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe A To Z - Volume 1 with its thirteen subsequent volumes—this is all we've got, and, particularly for major characters, it is comprehensive. However, The DC Comics Encyclopedia plays up some of the more . . . unfortunate aspects of recent mainstream comics from DC and Marvel. Continuity is a mess, contradicting itself all too frequently, and this volume does nothing to address this, often failing to issue even a rudimentary explanation. Superhero costumes, particularly on female characters—but, significantly, not male ones—are sexist, and sometimes, frankly embarrassing; some of the female characters' backstories equally embarrassingly coincide—how many male superheroes in this volume were strippers/hookers/victims of sexual assault, dare I ask? And most irritatingly, the persistent, repeated, and frequent careless and blatant errors in editing (editors' notes not being excised , obviously wrong information in data boxes, mistakes in identifying characters—things that a book of this sort really ought to get right) led me to the conclusion that the corporate masters at Time Warner—note that I'm not blaming DK Publishing, as they're only the agent, as it were, though they may bear some responsibility as well—believe we're so fanatical that we'll buy anything featuring our beloved characters, no matter how shoddy. It's disrespectful, in a nutshell. Several friends of mine have alleged that Marvel, owned by Disney, and DC Comics, owned by Time Warner, have abandoned the effort to publish true, taut quality stories, in favor of the bottom line and R&D on future cash cows, at least in such a way as does not seem as evident at, say, Image Comics, Dark Horse, or even IDW Publishing—one of the foremost publishers of quality licensed comics. Other friends have expressed their belief that as a result, the traditional "Big Two", with their corporate model of work-for-hire and, again, R&D, are moribund: It may take two years, it may take twenty, but in one sense or another Marvel and DC are not long for this world. I hate to say it, given how many years of my life I've invested in their products, but The DC Comics Encyclopedia doesn't exactly quell this impression. We'll see whether I feel differently after reading the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe, or even the Marvel Encyclopedia (also published by DK). At this point, I'm no longer sure.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cat Springer

    Already outdated but gorgeous comic books encyclopedia of the DC Universe by famed & popular DK Publishers. Trying to remember Eclipso and why he has such attitude? Ever wondered what Lois Lane's middle name (Joanne) and true eye color is (blue)? Startled that the Joker actually has a "girlfriend" and that she's still alive ("I am NOT a doormat, Mistah J! ...am I?")? Then this is your one-stop shop for the sillier of the two long-standing comic universes, DC. Filled with minutia and busting Already outdated but gorgeous comic books encyclopedia of the DC Universe by famed & popular DK Publishers. Trying to remember Eclipso and why he has such attitude? Ever wondered what Lois Lane's middle name (Joanne) and true eye color is (blue)? Startled that the Joker actually has a "girlfriend" and that she's still alive ("I am NOT a doormat, Mistah J! ...am I?")? Then this is your one-stop shop for the sillier of the two long-standing comic universes, DC. Filled with minutia and busting with color, it's A-Z with characters, super groups, organizations, alien races, vehicles, weapons, greatest battles, even romantic entanglements. If superhero comics is your soap opera -- as it is mine -- this is the ultimate scorecard to who's who. Still, it's ALREADY been updated after two years of publication. NOT a good sign, but, well, things change! Buy this! (But you REALLY want to read Marvel, don't you?) Great cover art by famed realist painter Alex Ross.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Parka

    (More pictures at parkablogs.com) This is the 2008 edition of The DC Comics Encyclopedia, and it looks very comprehensive. Over 1000 characters are packed into this 400-page hardcover. The characters are arranged alphabetically so they are pretty easy to find, and all are illustrated with beautiful images from original comic books. Since there are so many characters, the lesser known ones get only a small entry. It's a very good read with lots of interesting details on c (More pictures at parkablogs.com) This is the 2008 edition of The DC Comics Encyclopedia, and it looks very comprehensive. Over 1000 characters are packed into this 400-page hardcover. The characters are arranged alphabetically so they are pretty easy to find, and all are illustrated with beautiful images from original comic books. Since there are so many characters, the lesser known ones get only a small entry. It's a very good read with lots of interesting details on character background. Great book for those into superheroes and comics.

  9. 4 out of 5

    RazoDrn10

    Incredible comic, I like the description of the characters

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Bennett

    My coffee table source book for DC comics quick reference.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Agilulfo Kurz

    I really love this. I use it as a reference when it comes to DC Comics. Hopefully Marvel has something similar.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lostshark

    It is a beautiful fantasy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Crooked Little Vein has become one of my guilty pleasures, and thankfully I found the book at a good price in a used bookstore. For as many times as the book made me grin, laugh, or just shake my head there were times I felt like I should feel slightly ashamed reading the story. The sound bite description of the plot is this. PI Mike McGill is hired by the President’s Chief of Staff to find a long lost (about 50 year lost) book that is the secret constitution of the U.S. By reading th Crooked Little Vein has become one of my guilty pleasures, and thankfully I found the book at a good price in a used bookstore. For as many times as the book made me grin, laugh, or just shake my head there were times I felt like I should feel slightly ashamed reading the story. The sound bite description of the plot is this. PI Mike McGill is hired by the President’s Chief of Staff to find a long lost (about 50 year lost) book that is the secret constitution of the U.S. By reading this book at large gatherings the government plans to reset U.S. morals and practices to where they were in the 1950s. To say the least, down on his fortunes McGill starts out happy to take the ½ million dollars and the assignment. In meeting traveling companion Trixie he begins a journey through the American sexual underground, and the same time the question is raised, what is mainstream in an era where you can find just about everything on the ‘net. It is not a piece of great writing. Truthfully, author Warren Ellis, much better known for his graphic novels, appeared to have strung together a series of his internet articles and items he and others, whom he acknowledges in an afterward, have found on the net. But, I had lots of fun reading this light 276-page novel. And, there is something to be said for posing questions such as, what is Mainstream? Would you give the government a mind control device (in this case the book), and is information a WMD (in essence and not in the way you might think after reading this review).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Peekablue

    I will begin by saying that I am not a comic book reader but after reading this book, I'm considering taking it up. I wanted this book because I am a fan of the animated TV shows featuring heroes from the DC comics (i.e. Batman TAS, Justice Leage, Justice League Unlimited). I wanted to learn more about all of these characters that I had grown fond of, so I asked for this book for Christmas & got it. The hardcover is fairly large. It features heroes & villains in alphabetical o I will begin by saying that I am not a comic book reader but after reading this book, I'm considering taking it up. I wanted this book because I am a fan of the animated TV shows featuring heroes from the DC comics (i.e. Batman TAS, Justice Leage, Justice League Unlimited). I wanted to learn more about all of these characters that I had grown fond of, so I asked for this book for Christmas & got it. The hardcover is fairly large. It features heroes & villains in alphabetical order. It gives a brief but detailed summary of each character's history. There is a short profile on each that includes their "real" name, occupation, status (hero/villain), height, weight, eye/hair color, & description of their powers or talents. It also features at least one illustration of the character. The more prominent figures get a larger spread (Batman gets 4 pages, for instance). There are layouts featuring famous vehicles, weapons, team-ups, & romances from the comics. I have looked through this book many times since I got it. I have found it extremely interesting & helpful. Of course, I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information. Like I said, I'm seriously considering getting into comic books. I also received the Marvel Comics edition, & between the two, this one seems to be more thorough. This is an amazing volume.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Argott

    I was heartbroken to read under the entry for Bouncing Boy that: . . . Bouncing Boy has yet to leave his mark in other Legion timelines. In the reality created after the events of Zero Hour, Chuck Taine [Bouncing Boy's secret identity:] worked with the Legion as an engineer and mechanic, but did not demonstrate any of his signature bouncing abilities. How come every time they revamp a comic universe they ruin my favorite characters? Come on, a Legion of Super-Heroes without Bouncing Boy?!? It makes me s/>. I was heartbroken to read under the entry for Bouncing Boy that: . . . Bouncing Boy has yet to leave his mark in other Legion timelines. In the reality created after the events of Zero Hour, Chuck Taine [Bouncing Boy's secret identity:] worked with the Legion as an engineer and mechanic, but did not demonstrate any of his signature bouncing abilities. How come every time they revamp a comic universe they ruin my favorite characters? Come on, a Legion of Super-Heroes without Bouncing Boy?!? It makes me sick. Jerks. When I was a kid, watching Diff'rent Strokes with my Grandma in the room was very unpleasant. I loved her, but she could be bitter. You couldn't exactly savor Arnold Jackson's dry wit with her yammering on every 72 seconds about how she'd never let any kid talk to her like that. I guess I was fortunate that she was unable to gain possession of the remote control. God knows what we would have watched. Probably Hee Haw. And yet, I am now so completely beginning to understand Grandma's disgust. Even by my relaxed standards of odd, Grandma struck me as being rather odd. And not the kind of odd I want to understand. Thanks again, DC. No doubt Frank Miller is somehow responsible.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

    This source was somewhat disappointing for me. Yes, it has all of the characters you would think of although John Constantine does not get his own separate entry oddly enough. The descriptions don't do justice to the history of characters like Superman and Wonder Woman. Most of the details of these icons are cursory of the past half century or so and much more detailed about the current incarnation. Most of the pre-Crisis history of any character still active post-Crisis is very cursory. Honestl This source was somewhat disappointing for me. Yes, it has all of the characters you would think of although John Constantine does not get his own separate entry oddly enough. The descriptions don't do justice to the history of characters like Superman and Wonder Woman. Most of the details of these icons are cursory of the past half century or so and much more detailed about the current incarnation. Most of the pre-Crisis history of any character still active post-Crisis is very cursory. Honestly, I'd have settled for no descriptions of their various Western heroes and non-superpowered heroes (except for folks like Batman, Robin, Nightwing and Lois Lane). I didn't much care about that stuff; I wanted more details on the superheroes not every character in their comics (which according to the encyclopedia were not covered). The artwork was snippets from comics, which of course meant as early as the late 1930's for some comics, so some was really good and some was good for the time but not good for today. The writing was okay, but not stellar. My only other criticism is I wish they'd detailed the powers of each character a bit more. Overall, it is a good detailed reference for current characters, but do not expect it to be comprehensive for each character.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eric Klee

    This is a beautiful, giant-sized coffee table book for any fan of DC Comics. It gives you an in-depth, yet succinct, account of DC Comics' heroes, villains, and those in between. It provides their statistics and a well-written history for each. Each entry is dotted with images from the actual comics across the years. Also included are entries for important events in the DC Universe, such as the Crisis on Infinite Earths. The downside? None of the facts and figures in this book are rel This is a beautiful, giant-sized coffee table book for any fan of DC Comics. It gives you an in-depth, yet succinct, account of DC Comics' heroes, villains, and those in between. It provides their statistics and a well-written history for each. Each entry is dotted with images from the actual comics across the years. Also included are entries for important events in the DC Universe, such as the Crisis on Infinite Earths. The downside? None of the facts and figures in this book are relevant anymore in DC Comics' New 52 reboot. The heroes and villains in the current DC Comics no longer have the history displayed so wonderfully in this book. So, if you're a huge fan of DC Comics pre-2011, this is a fantastic book for you. It serves as a great reminder of the classic stories that DC offered prior to scrapping everything and starting over. Just be aware that none of the information presented apply to present-day DC Comics.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Grayson

    My mom and dad gave me this book, "The DC Comics Encyclopedia" for Christmas in 2010 along with The Marvel Encyclopedia. I love both of them. Just like the Marvel book, you can look up anybody that's in DC Comics stories or movies and read everything you would ever want to know about them. You can look up Superman, Batman, or any others and that includes the villains and other characters and creatures. It gives information about what they look like (there are pictures for most all of My mom and dad gave me this book, "The DC Comics Encyclopedia" for Christmas in 2010 along with The Marvel Encyclopedia. I love both of them. Just like the Marvel book, you can look up anybody that's in DC Comics stories or movies and read everything you would ever want to know about them. You can look up Superman, Batman, or any others and that includes the villains and other characters and creatures. It gives information about what they look like (there are pictures for most all of them), their secret names if they have one like Clark Kent or Bruce Wayne, how they get their powers and what they are, and more stuff about their background. I enjoyed reading it and sometimes I will get it out or the Marvel book out and look up someone if I see a movie about them or something. It's really fun and I recommend that you get both of these books and buy them so you can have them to look up characters. They are awesome!

  19. 4 out of 5

    M

    In an effort to put together a resource book for the various characters populating the DC universe, this tome reflects the futility of such a gesture. While two-page spreads cover a few moments and stories involved with big name heroes and villains, many others are shafted into three-paragraph entries that do not tell the full story. The book itself is filled with numerous editorial mistakes, from duplicate text to mislabeled team rosters to errant character information. The updated version fare In an effort to put together a resource book for the various characters populating the DC universe, this tome reflects the futility of such a gesture. While two-page spreads cover a few moments and stories involved with big name heroes and villains, many others are shafted into three-paragraph entries that do not tell the full story. The book itself is filled with numerous editorial mistakes, from duplicate text to mislabeled team rosters to errant character information. The updated version fares little better, referencing missing entries and offering only snippets of an update. Even more disappointing is that the DCnU reboot has drastically altered the entire DC universe - making this historical volume all but obsolete. Overall, a faulty attempt easily overshadowed by Marvel's ongoing character compendiums and updates.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Vinicius Medeiros

    The DC Comics Encyclopedia is everything the name says: a complete guide to everything about the fantastic world of DC characters and universe, focusing on super-heroes and villains, major stories and battles. Ive been reading - and loving - DC Comics since my ealy childhood, and this book was very useful and full of information even for a veteran like me. Most of the characters are descripted in small entries, but the major heroes and villains like Superman and Wonder Woman receive four pages f The DC Comics Encyclopedia is everything the name says: a complete guide to everything about the fantastic world of DC characters and universe, focusing on super-heroes and villains, major stories and battles. I´ve been reading - and loving - DC Comics since my ealy childhood, and this book was very useful and full of information even for a veteran like me. Most of the characters are descripted in small entries, but the major heroes and villains like Superman and Wonder Woman receive four pages full of illustrations and more text, which is a plus. For die hard fans or enyone interested in the super-hero universe, this book is essential.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is a heavy book both to read and physically, it holds a lot of information on nearly each and every character however big or small their presence in the DC 'universe' they may have had. The artwork and presentation are faultless though as you can imagine some of the more prominent characters their entries are a little sparse. However what it lacks in details it makes up in other ways. Its hard going and almost impossible to read from one end to the other in one go - it really is a reference This is a heavy book both to read and physically, it holds a lot of information on nearly each and every character however big or small their presence in the DC 'universe' they may have had. The artwork and presentation are faultless though as you can imagine some of the more prominent characters their entries are a little sparse. However what it lacks in details it makes up in other ways. Its hard going and almost impossible to read from one end to the other in one go - it really is a reference book in every sense . that said it is fascinating and shows how long running, creative and detailed the world of DC comics really has become.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cat Springer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is NOT a good sign, when a "definitive" edition of a rather pricey encyclopedia feels the need to update itself every two years because, well, things change in the comic book universes. I suppose DK will follow suit with Marvel before too long. Fortunately I got this for next to nothing by rejoining the Science Fiction Book Club, you have to love the intro package deals. 48 additional pages, updated entries as stated, expanded entries of their main characters. Go with this one if you haven' This is NOT a good sign, when a "definitive" edition of a rather pricey encyclopedia feels the need to update itself every two years because, well, things change in the comic book universes. I suppose DK will follow suit with Marvel before too long. Fortunately I got this for next to nothing by rejoining the Science Fiction Book Club, you have to love the intro package deals. 48 additional pages, updated entries as stated, expanded entries of their main characters. Go with this one if you haven't purchased the book before, of course. Boootiful illustrations. But, oops! Batman's "dead". Guess you'll have to wait for the 2010 edition for that...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Makes for a nice coffee table book, but the information contained within quickly goes out of date if you're a fan of the continuity of the DC Universe. With DC rebooting everything with thir new 52 Universe, it makes the info contained in the book pretty much obsolete. Still, a nice book to have if you're a fan of the "history" of what came before and at what time. I liked it so much I gave it away to a friend whom I knew would enjoy it. So yeah, I guess it makes a nice gift. Makes for a nice coffee table book, but the information contained within quickly goes out of date if you're a fan of the continuity of the DC Universe. With DC rebooting everything with thir new 52 Universe, it makes the info contained in the book pretty much obsolete. Still, a nice book to have if you're a fan of the "history" of what came before and at what time. I liked it so much I gave it away to a friend whom I knew would enjoy it. So yeah, I guess it makes a nice gift. I knew I should have gotten the Vertigo one instead :-)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    A great guide to everything in the DC Comics universe. This books works a lot better than the Marvel equivalent. As each history is dealt with a character at a time it means you don't have to read through lots of history that you're not interested in whereas Marvel was done year by year which left you reading through lots of stuff you weren't interested in just to get to info on your favourite comics, characters and storylines.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ren

    Funny story, I found this in my school library and kept coming back to look at it. Eventually I got it as a gift and it has since been a valuable book to a comic reader like myself. While it does leave out minor characters, the Encyclopia ultimately shows the wide variety and vast expansion of the DC Universe. With plenty of solid information and wonderful art, the DC Comics Encyclopedia is a must have for comic readers everywhere.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristal

    As a whole I liked this book. I watch most of the tv shows that are based on DC comics and it was great to find out more about the characters. Although I was annoyed there were few characters missing from the book. Notably, how John Constantine was mentioned several times, but he doesn't have his own bio.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kassandra

    Okay so I didn't actually read the entire book, but only those characters that I actually knew, or was interested in knowing, and although a lot of the information was a little out of date, it was a lot of fun to be able to see the old continuity and see how many of these characters started out and which of their stories influenced them the most.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Not really a cover-to-cover read, but great to pick up in a down moment to read about some real obscure characters. I don't know if they've updated this, but some events of the past couple of years make some of this information obsolete.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Fairweather

    Awesome reference book for nearly all characters and major events up to 2008. Beautiful artwork and layout. Some characters I would have liked to have seen more detail but I understand the need to contain the universe to some standards. Worthy of being a coffee table book for all to see.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    Great text for DC Comics fans, but not as in depth as most comics buffs would want in a book deemed an encyclopedia. Covers DC story lines and characters up through the mini-series Infinite Crisis and mega-series 52. Maybe future editions will add more information and features.

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