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Avengers vs. X-Men Omnibus

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The Avengers and the X-Men - the two most popular super-hero teams in history - go to war! This landmark pop-culture event brings together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Black Widow, Spider-Man, Wolverine, Cyclops, Storm, Magneto and more in the story that changes them forever! And in AVX: Vs., experience the larger-than-life battles too big for any other comic to The Avengers and the X-Men - the two most popular super-hero teams in history - go to war! This landmark pop-culture event brings together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Black Widow, Spider-Man, Wolverine, Cyclops, Storm, Magneto and more in the story that changes them forever! And in AVX: Vs., experience the larger-than-life battles too big for any other comic to contain! Iron Man vs. Magneto! Spider-Man vs. Colossus! Captain America vs. Gambit! And more! Plus: For the first time ever in print, Marvel's groundbreaking Infinite Comics are collected, revealing key events through the eyes of Marvel's major players. It's Marvel's biggest event ever - but will the Avengers or the X-Men emerge triumphant? Collecting: Avengers vs. X-Men 0-12, AVX: VS 1-6, Avengers vs. X-Men: Infinite 1, 6, 10, & materiel from Point One


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The Avengers and the X-Men - the two most popular super-hero teams in history - go to war! This landmark pop-culture event brings together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Black Widow, Spider-Man, Wolverine, Cyclops, Storm, Magneto and more in the story that changes them forever! And in AVX: Vs., experience the larger-than-life battles too big for any other comic to The Avengers and the X-Men - the two most popular super-hero teams in history - go to war! This landmark pop-culture event brings together Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk, Black Widow, Spider-Man, Wolverine, Cyclops, Storm, Magneto and more in the story that changes them forever! And in AVX: Vs., experience the larger-than-life battles too big for any other comic to contain! Iron Man vs. Magneto! Spider-Man vs. Colossus! Captain America vs. Gambit! And more! Plus: For the first time ever in print, Marvel's groundbreaking Infinite Comics are collected, revealing key events through the eyes of Marvel's major players. It's Marvel's biggest event ever - but will the Avengers or the X-Men emerge triumphant? Collecting: Avengers vs. X-Men 0-12, AVX: VS 1-6, Avengers vs. X-Men: Infinite 1, 6, 10, & materiel from Point One

30 review for Avengers vs. X-Men Omnibus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Blech. I can't believe I read the whole thing. The underlying plot was a good idea, but it turned into a really goofy slug-fest. Hope is the first mutant born since Wanda's 'No More Mutants' thing, and the Phoenix is on the way to use her for something. Is that a good thing, or is it an End-Of-The-World thing? 600 pages later...and I don't care. This could have perhaps been a better read if the VS stuff hadn't been displayed so prominently. It's a comic, so of course I wanna see some fighting, but Blech. I can't believe I read the whole thing. The underlying plot was a good idea, but it turned into a really goofy slug-fest. Hope is the first mutant born since Wanda's 'No More Mutants' thing, and the Phoenix is on the way to use her for something. Is that a good thing, or is it an End-Of-The-World thing? 600 pages later...and I don't care. This could have perhaps been a better read if the VS stuff hadn't been displayed so prominently. It's a comic, so of course I wanna see some fighting, but this? Whatever this was just flat-out sucked. The 'extra' battle scenes at the end of the book were awful. Saying they were campy would be a compliment. They were stupid. The most annoying, in my opinion, was Black Widow vs Magik. Part of the dialogue was in Russian, and in order to read it you needed to download an app on your phone. What?! Yeah, cause I like to fiddle with my phone like a teenager while I'm reading. Idiots. There were a few fun moments in this train wreck, but not enough to make me want to recommend this to anyone. Skip it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Phoenix - the fiery and all-powerful being that possessed Jean Grey in the “Dark Phoenix Saga” - is returning to Earth because the “creative” directors at Marvel have run out of ideas and are desperately ransacking past, greater storylines for their new books. The vessel Phoenix is going to choose, everyone thinks, will be Hope, the first and only mutant born after Scarlet Witch’s “No More Mutants” curse. Captain America and co. remember the devastation brought about by Phoenix the last time it Phoenix - the fiery and all-powerful being that possessed Jean Grey in the “Dark Phoenix Saga” - is returning to Earth because the “creative” directors at Marvel have run out of ideas and are desperately ransacking past, greater storylines for their new books. The vessel Phoenix is going to choose, everyone thinks, will be Hope, the first and only mutant born after Scarlet Witch’s “No More Mutants” curse. Captain America and co. remember the devastation brought about by Phoenix the last time it visited Earth and bonded with Jean Grey, so they are understandably terrified of this happening again. If Hope is to be the new Phoenix, she must die. But Cyclops and co. believe Phoenix’s return will signal the rebirth of the mutant race and undo the damage caused by Scarlet Witch. If Hope is to be the new Phoenix, she must live. And so we have Avengers Vs. X-Men, a massive Royal Rumble of superheroes sparked by an argument about a being nobody fully understands and a possibility nobody knows will happen for sure. I did actually find the first cycle of fighting exciting and thought that with the fighting out of the way so early, maybe this predictable scenario would take a different turn? However, that initial burst of interest was long eclipsed by the sheer banality of the rest of the story and unrelenting tedium of the endless fighting. Superhero comics are more than just fighting but that’s all this superhero book is: fight fight fight. And despite having a massive cast of characters, all of whom have decades of defined personalities, this book essentially wipes away all traces of them so they’re all monotone dullards. Spider-man (in his brief appearances) doesn’t crack jokes or say anything witty or interesting because all this fighting is all so serious. Iron Man is basically relegated to the side-lines to scientifically figure out how to beat Phoenix (by the way, where’s Reed Richards?) so when he appears he’s talking boring science crap; his charming, roguish personality is entirely absent. Instead, arguably the two most boring characters in the Marvel U are given centre stage: Cyclops and Captain America. Cap is whiter than white bread and with his no-nonsense manner of speaking is about as interesting: he is practical, dull, and unimaginative, repeatedly yelling “Avengers Assemble!” way too many times. Cyclops has the personality of a brick. When he’s not being told what to do by his girlfriend, he’s whining about mutants being an endangered species for the billionth time, wittering on like a fussy hen and glumly looking into the middle distance. These have got to be the most tedious men to ever headline a superhero comic. Long before this book was over I wanted both of these dudes dead, never to return. Then there's Scarlet Witch. I hate this character because she is a literary device personified: she is deus ex machina. It doesn't have to make sense, whatever she says goes. "No More Mutants"? Done. "No More Phoenix"? Done. Rubbish! It's too convenient, too easy, and is just lazy writing. My edition was the mammoth 568 page hardback. After the Avengers Vs. X-Men #0-#12 main issue story arc comes the #1-#6 AVX issues which are just fights. At least with the main storyline there are respites from the fighting to attempt including some sorely needed elements like dialogue, ideas, character and plot development (despite none of these things being effectively pulled off); with AVX, it’s just fighting. So we get some arbitrary fights with Iron Man Vs Magneto, Magik Vs Black Widow, Namor Vs Thing, and so on. These are fights that are supposed to be happening in the main story but were separate to keep that story from slowing down. It was with AVX that I realised why Marvel had asked a WWE wrestler to intro this book – these fights were the comic book equivalent of WWE wrestling: staged, colourful, and meaningless. (The wrestler is CM Punk who incorrectly calls his foreword to the book a “forward” - yep, that’s the level of intelligence this book elicits). Finishing off this book is Infinite Comics #1, #6 and #10. Infinite was created for the sole purpose of reading comics digitally on tablets, which is a great idea. Content-wise, these comics rehash the events already gone over in the main story arc but with added pages that don’t improve the story. Consequently, like AVX, Infinite feels like an unnecessary add-on. And speaking of unnecessary add-ons, you may be wondering what the “AR” boxes appearing on every other page in the book mean - “Augmented Reality” is another innovative feature by Marvel to integrate interactive content into their comics. Because when I read comics, I always think, this is good but what I really want when reading is to watch video. It’s a strange idea to insert video of artists informing the reader how they came up with a particular design choice for the panel but how interested are you in hearing about that really? It depends on the reader but I’m not one of those who needs to know everything about the creation of a comic. Also, I read to read – I’m not some ADHD kid who needs to flick from reading to watching video and back again every few panels. Some of the best comics writers working today worked on this book. Jason Aaron, one of my favourite comics writers, has written a great run on Wolverine and is working on the even better Wolverine & the X-Men title; Ed Brubaker wrote one of the most acclaimed Captain America books ever; Jonathan Hickman’s doing stellar work on FF and Fantastic Four; and Brian Michael Bendis, whose work on Ultimate Spider-man, Marvel’s flagship character, speaks for itself: 12 years of first class writing and counting, his stewardship of that character has been invaluable to Marvel and readers alike. And yet, all of them worked on this book and all of them failed to create an interesting story. Too many cooks in the kitchen maybe? But it makes me think that maybe it’s not just the writers who should be blamed for this awful book but the dodgy creative direction at Marvel who steered this book into such unfathomably crap waters. Either way, despite this book having enormous talent attached, it is a massive artistic failure. So another year, another lacklustre Marvel Comics event. “Avengers Vs X-Men” is for those who enjoy WWE wrestling and like to play with gadgets and watch videos rather than read a comic straight through. This book is dumber than Lou Ferrigno’s pants. It’s also for people who don’t care much about anything related to good storytelling, like character development, memorable scenes and dialogue, and good writing – just superheroes punching one another. This review is already too long so I won’t go into the many plot holes the flimsy premise of this book rests upon but suffice it to say “Avengers Vs X-Men” is a cynical, contrived, bloated mess of a book that, despite its immense bluster, is ultimately a very small, piecemeal story with forgettable moments offering nothing of substance. If someone tells you this is a good book and is worth reading, be very suspicious. Chances are they’re waiting for you to fall asleep somewhere around the 300th page and umpteenth consequence-free fight, then steal your kidneys. But I’d wake up! you say. Oh no - reading this boring book is far more potent than camphor. You won’t awaken until it’s all over. To re-iterate: read this and you will lose your kidneys to the black market and die. To avoid this inevitable fate, stay far away from “Avengers Vs. X-Men”. But who wins? you ask, the Avengers or the X-Men? Nobody wins, you poor soul. We all lose by reading this. If you want to know the spoilers but don't want to read the book, they are: (view spoiler)[ Scarlet Witch's "No More Mutants" curse from "House of M" is lifted; Phoenix is vanquished - though only temporarily I'm sure; Xavier is dead - but then he's died many times before and will doubtless be back soon; Cyclops did the deed and is arrested; Utopia is no more, just another Genosha. (hide spoiler)]

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    Like many comic book fans, I’m suffering from acute crossover fatigue, and this one didn’t do anything to cure me of it. I was moderately interested because it seemed like it would address the fact that it’s starting to feel like the mutants and the other Marvel characters inhabit completely separate universes. (Except for when crossover time rolled around.) It’s got a decent set-up for a conflict between the two teams. The Phoenix force is on its way to Earth to bond with Hope, the only mutant b Like many comic book fans, I’m suffering from acute crossover fatigue, and this one didn’t do anything to cure me of it. I was moderately interested because it seemed like it would address the fact that it’s starting to feel like the mutants and the other Marvel characters inhabit completely separate universes. (Except for when crossover time rolled around.) It’s got a decent set-up for a conflict between the two teams. The Phoenix force is on its way to Earth to bond with Hope, the only mutant born since the Scarlet Witch put the whammy on them in House of M. Cyclops thinks Hope might be able to manage Phoenix to reboot the mutant species, but Captain America thinks that leaving the fate of the world in the hands of one mutant girl might be a tad dangerous and wants to take her into custody. That’s a valid reason for conflict between the two teams, but the whole thing quickly devolves into fight after fight that becomes a big messy smear of a story. One of my biggest problems was that I’m getting a little tired of seeing the Marvel heroes fight each other. Civil War featured the good guys choosing sides. House of M was essentially about Scarlet Witch going nutso and rewriting the universe. While Fear Itself had a couple of bad guys, it also featured some of the strongest heroes being brainwashed and fighting the others. This whole thing about hero vs. hero has been done so much recently that it doesn’t seem remotely fresh. Aren’t there any villains left with evil plans? A major character death at the hands of another might have been shocking and had some impact if the murdered character hadn’t died multiple times already and if there was any real sense that this would have permanent consequences. But considering this happens in a story concerning Phoenix which is returning for the umpteenth time, it doesn’t really seem like it’ll matter.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    The Phoenix is coming again. It has burnt a fiery path of destruction on its way to Earth. The Avengers and X-Men know where it's heading or rather who it's heading to, Hope Summers. Cyclops believes the Phoenix through Hope will bring back mutant kind from the brink of extinction, but the Avengers fear for the Earth. Cyclops along with the X-Men are adamant that Hope stays with them even if it means war against the Avengers. These are mutants These are mutants on Phoenix. I know it looks cool, but The Phoenix is coming again. It has burnt a fiery path of destruction on its way to Earth. The Avengers and X-Men know where it's heading or rather who it's heading to, Hope Summers. Cyclops believes the Phoenix through Hope will bring back mutant kind from the brink of extinction, but the Avengers fear for the Earth. Cyclops along with the X-Men are adamant that Hope stays with them even if it means war against the Avengers. These are mutants These are mutants on Phoenix. I know it looks cool, but it turns even rule following boy scouts like Cyclops into even bigger pricks than ever before. The whole story reeks of desperation to undue the Scarlet Witch decimating the mutant population. It seemed like the authors couldn't figure out what to do so someone said "lets just bring back the Phoenix and have the X-Men fight the Avengers." No one else had a better idea so they went with it. Avengers vs X-Men was weak to say it kindly and bloated from so many heroes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jokoloyo

    A fighting porn limited series from Marvel. ================== Porn: television programs, magazine, books, etc. that are regarded as emphasizing the sensuous or sensational aspects of a nonsexual subject and stimulating a compulsive interest in their audience. Source: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/porn

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dino-Jess ✮ The Book Eating Dinosaur ✮

    This was HORRIBLE. I never really liked Cyclops, but I sure loathe him now. What a douchecanoe. And I know there are different people doing the art, but Hope goes from being a pre-teen to a young woman from issue to issue. Where's the consistency? The art is not very nice overall and the story? Oh my gosh, trainwreck. Get over yourselves, X-Men and Avengers. I'm giving an extra half star purely because of Spiderman's banter. What a drainer. 1.5 lets-fight-for-no-reason-at-all Stars

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Another year, another disappointing Marvel crossover event. The premise is right there in the title. Unfortunately, building the crossover meant jettisoning a much better plot. Before I begin, full disclosure: I'm not entirely up to date on what's going on with Marvel. I haven't really read much since House of M (I know, I know). So when (say) Illyana shows up, I don't say, "hey, Magik, cool," I say, "wait, when did she come back?" Also, I came through comics (not just Marvel, all comics) throug Another year, another disappointing Marvel crossover event. The premise is right there in the title. Unfortunately, building the crossover meant jettisoning a much better plot. Before I begin, full disclosure: I'm not entirely up to date on what's going on with Marvel. I haven't really read much since House of M (I know, I know). So when (say) Illyana shows up, I don't say, "hey, Magik, cool," I say, "wait, when did she come back?" Also, I came through comics (not just Marvel, all comics) through X-Men, so my sympathies are indeed likely to start there. So, the story, such as it is. The Phoenix is coming to merge with/take possession of Hope, billed as the mutant messiah. (Nobody really argues that point in the book.) The Avengers, lead by Captain America, decide based only on a conversation with Wolverine (who totally has no reason to be bitter or biased here, no way) that this must be stopped at all costs, or... stuff. The end of the world is bandied about a lot, but it's not clear why they think this world will end. At no point (in the main book, at least) does Cap or anyone else on the Avengers side speak to anybody but Wolverine about the Phoenix. Inexcusable, since Rachel Summers (former Phoenix herself) is in the same building, but nobody speaks to her. Since Cyclops won't hand over a teenage girl under his care (who, remember, he considers the one who will save mutantkind from complete extinction) to the first non-mutant who demands to arrest her, Cap immediately throws the couple dozen Avengers he brought at the X-Men. You can see already what side of the conflict I'm falling on. And I think it's fair to say that everything that happens from this point onwards comes about solely from the actions of the Avengers. Including the fairly well publicized plot twist of the Phoenix instead possessing Cyclops, Emma Frost, the Rasputin siblings, and Namor. (view spoiler)[Iron Man's attempt to destory or delay the Phoenix ends up splitting and corrupting it. So everything that the Phoenix five do can be traced back to him, which he actually acknowledges, rarely. (hide spoiler)] Worse yet is the way the crisis is finally resolved. (view spoiler)[Hope herself takes in the entirety of the Phoenix force and uses it to reverse what Scarlet Witch did at the end of House of M- instead of "no more mutants" it's now "more mutants". Which nobody on the Avengers side acknowledges is exactly what would have happened anyways, if they hadn't meddled. (hide spoiler)] The cherry on top is that nobody seems to care much about Scarlet Witch having decimated the mutant population in House of M, making Scott's argument that the Avengers in general just don't care about mutants sound a lot less crazy. ETA: After writing this review, I found out that Mr. Fantastic, of all people, called out the Avengers on their culpability here. Basically, maybe the Phoenix Five would stop beating them up if they'd stop attacking them. Considering what a massive jerk he'd been during Civil War, it makes for a pretty effective (and deadly accurate) voice of reason moment for him. But let's be honest here. This is really nothing more than an excuse to have big, overblown battles between big name characters. What could have been an interesting story, about Hope's struggles with her "destiny" as Phoenix, is brushed to the side in favor of things like Iron Man vs. Magneto. In fact, that's all the (included) AVX tie in was, context free battles that, frankly, weren't terribly interesting. The only thing that makes the AVX issues even remotely worth reading is the "fun fact" boxes, likely included by an editor who didn't buy in to the concept, with "facts" like "Tony Stark likes to exaggerate" and "Captain America has 15 levels in guilt tripping." The last issue abandons all pretense at being serious, and ends with a "battle" between Squirrel Girl and Pixie that implies the whole mess can be blamed on them accidentally playing with Puppet Master's mind-controlling action figures. Is it worth reading? Not really, no. There's virtually no substance here, and any attempts at such are brutally crushed by pointless battles. The entire event could have been avoided entirely if Captain America and Cyclops had actually talked instead of resorting immediately to battle. My read is that the Avengers bear a little more of the blame, since they don't even do a modicum of due dilligence before prepping for all-out war. But honestly, it probably isn't worth much thought.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lᴀʏᴀ Rᴀɴɪ #BookDiet2019

    The only real reason anyone should read Avengers vs X-Men is because of the fact that the 'repercussions of the storyline resulted in the new status quo of the Marvel Universe presented in the company's Marvel NOW! relaunch initiative'. It birthed a new line-up of X-titles based on the aftermath of said major event. Heck, I'm currently reading one now (Uncanny Avengers) which is shitty, by the way, and almost rivals X-Men Volume IV which I quit halfway through. I'm quitting Rick Remeder's UA s The only real reason anyone should read Avengers vs X-Men is because of the fact that the 'repercussions of the storyline resulted in the new status quo of the Marvel Universe presented in the company's Marvel NOW! relaunch initiative'. It birthed a new line-up of X-titles based on the aftermath of said major event. Heck, I'm currently reading one now (Uncanny Avengers) which is shitty, by the way, and almost rivals X-Men Volume IV which I quit halfway through. I'm quitting Rick Remeder's UA sooner rather than later as well. Sorry, Rick. It seems like not everything you write can be like your new ongoing series Low (which I like, so stick with that instead). ANYWAY, back to AVX. This mammoth collection clocked close to nine hundred pages (my soft copy has at least 798, and the one I use for updates here in Goodreads has eight-hundred-something). Regardless, this volume contains the centerpiece tale divided in three winding acts (with twelve or more issues, I honestly did not count) like a play, which ran for at least four hundred pages. The rest were just tie-ins concerning the varied fights among Avengers and X-Men which basically played out like cheesy pro-wrestling matches--even the writers themselves admit there was no plot--just a bunch of decent, noble superheroes tearing each other new assholes. I did not bother reading that part of this collection because FUCK...THAT. If I want to watch pro-wrestling, I'll watch pro-wrestling and not read it, for chrissake. That sort of choreographed fighting matches are best experienced in the live-action medium, thanks very much. With that said, my review will focus on the centerpiece narrative minus tie-ins, and so my rating will solely be based from that. Written by Brian Michael Bendis, Matt Fraction, Jason Aaron, Ed Brubaker , and illustrated by Jonathan Hickman, John Romita, Jr., and Olivier Coipel Adam Kubert, the colossal clusterfuck extravaganza deemed Avengers vs. X-Men had three major conflicts at its very core. With the exception of the stupid tie-ins, it's actually riveting examination of character arcs concerning a pair of men and women respectively--Captain America and Cyclops; Scarlet Witch and Hope Summers. As for the central conflicts themselves, I enumerated and summarized them as the following below: >> The Coming of the Phoenix Force and its ramifications >> Hope's failure to be its receptacle and her journey to reclaim it >> Cyclops and Captain America's clash of leadership and objectives The rest are either interrelated or consequential of these big three, in my opinion. As a concept, it's pretty interesting and definitely an enjoyable thing to watch unfold. The Avengers--world's heralded group of the mightiest heroes--and the X-Men--world's persecuted group of the most outcast misfits--finally reach a grand breaking point. For a time, these separate superhero factions have managed to live and serve in mutual co-existence, albeit the underlying tension and personal politics that define their working relationships. But since mutant and Avenger member Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) decimated mutant population, the X-Men became more marginalized than ever, just when you thought it was not possible. A chain of events followed where readers get to see Scott Summers, formerly known as the Golden Boy and favored son of Charles Xavier, be pushed to his limits until he was committing small atrocities in the name of the survival of mutantkind. Raised in the beliefs of a mentor who preached pacifist ways as oppose to violence, Cyclops unfortunately started leaning more on Magneto's philosophy until he was marching into a crusade that spits in the face of the values he was supposed to uphold as an X-Man. It was a gritty character development that no one saw coming until it was already walking that tight rope. With his desperation to save mutantkind, Scott Summers nearly destroys everything that wasn't a part of his beloved race. [CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGES] Some would say his war against the Avengers was an overreaction; others would say it was perfectly justified. Captain America--in spite of it being unintentional--had neglected to take account mutantkind in his American dream of truth, equality and justice. He had cast them out as a separate race who seem secondary to the humans. In Scott's eyes, it was an unforgivable act of both ignorance and arrogance. The Avengers have played as unaware enablers, shielding humanity from the worst of mutantkind instead of helping the X-Men educate humans to the best of their race. They worked together as teams multiple times, but it was out of tolerance than real camaraderie and friendship. And Scott finally has had enough of Captain America's self-righteousness and condescension. It was time for extreme measures. Can we really blame Scott for the steps he took to secure liberty and guarantee mutantkind's survival? After all, this was the same boy who was chosen and tasked by Professor X himself to lead his kind, one who is crippled by survivor's guilt at a tender age and who always felt the need to restrain his powers as oppose to fully embracing them. This boy grew up to be a man who lost his first love to an absolute power beyond anyone's comprehension; a man who had to hold together a fractured race of confused, terrified and powerful misfits whom human society continued to hunt down and kill; a man whom several circumstances with stakes against his favor kept pushing to a corner to until he finally pushed back. Avengers vs X-Men tells the story of Scott Summer's fall from grace, that horrific moment in his life when he was determined to accept the coming of the Phoenix Force to Earth, and the role that mutant messiah Hope had to play in all this, as the miracle he had been wishing for since the decimation. This was a man who had everything he believed in tested, broken down and twisted into something even he himself could no longer recognize. And so he was ready to bet it all and let the rebirth power of the Phoenix take course. The twist, however, came when the Phoenix refused Hope. The mutant messiah who was born and trained for greatness has flinched at the last second when she was supposed to receive the Phoenix, and in return the Phoenix claimed Scott Summers, Emma Frost, Namor, Colossus and Illyana Rasputin. The Phoenix Five began fixing the world's problems using their powers but they are ticking bombs that could explode any moment and so the Avengers have to put a stop to all this madness. One by one, the Phoenix Five are defeated until only Scott and Emma were left. As it turns out, the more their numbers decrease, the residual power of the Phoenix gets absorbed by the ones left, making the two lovers the most powerful beings in the universe. The only two people who can dissuade them are Hope and Wanda; the former was the rightful receptor of the Phoenix while the latter is the mutant who destroyed her own kind. It would seem even the Phoenix recognizes Wanda's powers as a destroyer, which was why Scott and Emma were wary of her. Meanwhile, Scott continues to justify his actions to his mentor and surrogate father: And even to himself, and the ghost of his beloved late Jean: The climactic moment took place when Charles Xavier tried one last time to get through Scott who had taken Emma out of the equation and absorbed the Phoenix for himself--turning him into the Dark Phoenix second incarnate. All is fucked when Scott killed the man in a symbolic gesture that was just as intimate and devastating: After the commotion settles, Hope stepped in and claimed the Phoenix as her own. As soon as she was possessed by it, she began repairing all the global damage the Phoenix Five previously inflicted due to their fights with the Avengers. Hours ago, she and Captain America had a heartfelt conversation where she asked him to trust her because she vowed she will do things differently. He did, but now that she had the Phoenix burning inside her, filling her with the glow of creation, Hope refused to let it go. She was meant to be the mutant messiah after all. She had to become the Phoenix for good and never relinquish its hold. But then Wanda the Scarlet Witch convinced her otherwise; this was a woman who had the power to bend and re-create realities at will, and she had used it to fracture mutantkind just to punish her father Magneto. She will now have to forever live with that atrocity for the rest of her life. She cautioned the young Hope to not commit the same mistake, assuring her that if Hope was strong enough to let that kind of monstrous power in, then she is strong enough to let it go. Across the world, thousands of mutants were being born again. It was the final gift of the Phoenix Force as Wanda and Hope relinquish it back to the cosmos where it belonged. Lives and relationships were never the same again. Captain America knew he had to establish a real working relationship between Avengers and the X-Men; Scott Summers was imprisoned and labeled a terrorist but was fine with it because his wish was granted; Wolverine and the rest of the X-Men bury Xavier together and mourn his passing, as he decided to open a new mutant school named after Jean Grey; and a new line-up of X-titles were born. This was a story meant to be read for posterity. It was unevenly paced, often alternating between being rushed or dragging, but had enough moments of great character conflicts to still be a riveting read for an X-Men fan who enjoys exploring the complicated interplay among its heroes and villains. Taking out the tie-ins out of consideration, Avengers vs. X-Men is an important work in itself in spite of its glaring flaws and a few plot holes here and there. RECOMMENDED: 7/10 DO READ MY REVIEWS AT:

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    Marvel's big event for 2012 was Avengers Versus X-Men (AvX) and I must say they pretty much accomplished what it set to do. It gave the fans a battle royale of its top two properties, it was able to move a lot of books during the duration of the event, and it gave the new readers who came in AvX a chance to stay and buy more comics after the story with its new Marvel NOW! initiative. The title says it all, the Avengers lead by Captain America up against the X-Men of Cyclops. Marvel's top two supe Marvel's big event for 2012 was Avengers Versus X-Men (AvX) and I must say they pretty much accomplished what it set to do. It gave the fans a battle royale of its top two properties, it was able to move a lot of books during the duration of the event, and it gave the new readers who came in AvX a chance to stay and buy more comics after the story with its new Marvel NOW! initiative. The title says it all, the Avengers lead by Captain America up against the X-Men of Cyclops. Marvel's top two superteams are divided by what to do with the coming of the Phoenix, an elemental . force of great power that could herald creation or destruction and its host apparent, Hope, the first mutant born after the events of House of M. I haven’t bought any comics regularly in years, being content in waiting for the trade, but I came back for AvX and preordered all twelve chapters. I wasn’t disappointed, it was all out action and the art was incredible. The writing was serviceable but it did have its character moments. This was an important story. AvX marked the end of what Brian Bendis began in the 2005 miniseries House of M. This story turned “No more mutants” into “More mutants” and effectively changed the status quo of the Marvel Universe. The end of AvX ushers in Marvel NOW!, a new initiative that turns the fallout from AvX into a new line of books that mixes and matches creators in new properties and perhaps hook in the new and returning readers that AvX brought. Almost all of the new Marvel launches this year reference AvX and is required reading to get into the flow of the story. I've read the original floppies of the main miniseries and some of the tie-ins so I was not enthusiastic about spending an additional sixty dollars for the hardcover but I was able to find a fellow fan who was willing to share the digital code that came with the purchase of the hardcover. Still,I found the digital version lacking since the print version and the floppies came with Marvel's patented Augmented Reality pages which one could access with an app and a smartphone or tablet. This added content had videos that often served as commentary or background information on the panels with the augmentation. The one aspect where the digital version has it over print are the Infinite Comics which came with the digital codes of the original floppies. These Infinite comics served as Marvel's initial salvo in exploiting the storytelling advantages inherent in the digital format. They worked quite well on digital. If one wants to get this story, I suggest hunting for the individual issues which remain near or sometimes less than cover price since almost all comic retailers ordered it in high numbers or waiting for a more affordable trade paperback.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    My review will be spotty as I'm reading this interleaved with the rest of the Avengers vs. X-Men event books. Nice setup - finally we see Hope's Phoenix power really threaten, and we get some genuine-seeming interactions between the key characters. However, once the fighting begins, the ridiculous narration as each pair of fighters punch each other is brutal. It's like an amateur boxing announcer, trying to generate gravitas and meaning from what are generally meaningless events. "Wow, looks like My review will be spotty as I'm reading this interleaved with the rest of the Avengers vs. X-Men event books. Nice setup - finally we see Hope's Phoenix power really threaten, and we get some genuine-seeming interactions between the key characters. However, once the fighting begins, the ridiculous narration as each pair of fighters punch each other is brutal. It's like an amateur boxing announcer, trying to generate gravitas and meaning from what are generally meaningless events. "Wow, looks like Luke Cage really got a good left hook on Namor!". Actually, the real writing is even more embarrassing: "Organic diamond meets multi-billion dollar armor. The most expensive punch in history." Some of the fights come out of nowhere on pretty trumped-up charges - like Wolverine vs. Captain America. When there's no natural tension, it's hard to care about the outcome or to feel caught up in the "epic nature" of this event. It creates a momentary interesting stress for Wolverine, and a couple of smiles at his predicament, but it wraps up all too quickly. The futile searches in issue 4 are hints of action that presumably unfolds in other comics, or doesn't matter - everything leading up to the fearsome meeting of force and host. The turning point mid-way through took me by surprise, and even though it seems too cool I'm sure the event mechanics can't help but screw it up somehow. And so they do - a pretty weakly-thought-out pretext for the US government to desire to intervene with Avengers (not even consistent with current policies let alone with logic) starts the whole ball rolling, and the rather extreme reaction by the X-Men in charge is even more out of place (among the many other options and historical behaviours available). I know this series is billed as "versus" but it's still klangs falsely to see everything so quickly reduce to "us or them" within the space of every issue or so. The most authentic in-character moment of this turn is when Namor throws a tantrum and finds a way to take "overboard" to a new level. I don't get Scott Summers being quite the asshole he's turned into here (though he's shown signs over the last few years), but the Emma of this part of the series is exactly what I'd expect. Unfortunately the two Russians are pretty much left out and not displaying a whiff of their true personalities. What I find frustrating about these Events is that the antagonists only get to enjoy their victory for about one issue before things start to go to hell. It's absolutely like they're on a clock, and there's no time to waste on exploring the new reality that comes about. I'd love to explore the world of the Phoenix Five for a less-limited time period (is this a world we could do a separate series on, like House of M?), and while some of the crossover books are trying to pick up this thread, in the main book it's like we're on rails and can't slow down to look around. I'd be just as interested in exploring the Avengers characters while they deal with defeat after defeat - what does Captain America start thinking when he just loses all the time? You know what this (and Shadowland, and Siege, and Fear Itself) reminds me of a little? Final Crisis, where Morrison wove decades of mythology together into the most compressed and inexcusably impossible-to-enjoy Wikipedia article on DC. It felt like all facts, no exploration. These events aren't *quite* that bad, but if you examine the main title only, it's hard to feel like you care when they follow such predictable story arcs: massive new threat, heroes gang together and lose, they regroup and find some arbitrary weakness of the threat, and inevitably come out bruised but victorious (optional: someone dies for up to a year). However, even despite this I felt a little thrill when Scott Summers finally starts to falter at an opponent he can't blow away, and the way that they've tied the different mythologies together to make this climax come about is creative, if not always entirely consistent or natural. Oddly, even though all writers are credited with the Story for every issue, the different writers' styles and biases start to really show near the end. When Scott decides he needs more power during a fight with Hope, it looks like he's gone over the edge (Brubaker). Next issue, he's afraid and disgusted with Emma's comfort with the power (Bendis). Hard to feel like a clear through-line was really well thought out. Bendis amps this up exactly the same way he amped up Siege - same double-page emphasis on dumb moments, same bombastic/fatalistic dialogue from characters who usually know better than to go to the edge and stay there. It's about the only destination you could go with the way this story has been structured, but it's disappointingly predictable. Then Aaron comes in at the end and does a great job pulling the challenges of a railed event together into a finale. I even accept how the Phoenix Force is dealt with, though I would far rather have liked to see Hope act as the Phoenix for a couple of years at least. But holy crap does Aaron (or the plotting team) fumble the wrap up. "Without his visor, Scott Summers couldn't open his eyes. But somehow he could still see all the blood on his hands." "this is something a bit more Uncanny.""Tony Stark, man of faith. Will wonders never cease?" "If only the ends always justified the means." Aaron just pulled off such a poetic ending for Scalped, and then he (they?) delivers this series of thudders. The VS issues are hit-and-miss, but on their own they're almost as much fun as "best of" team-up/one-shot comics classics. Just a way to blow off some steam between the heavily-plot-constrained issues we're wading through. Gambit? Forgettable. Spidey? Fun as always. Note: this is the one time I'll say it - Loeb does a decent job with his contribution to this book. A "versus" cage match between two bruisers? No subtlety or intelligence required, just muscles and grand displays of strength? Pretty much a gift for Loeb's limited "talents". I must admit tho, the NE-page fights in issue 6 are totally worth the $3. They don't make this whole book worth it, but they're pretty enjoyable in that they don't take *any* of this shit seriously. So does this event work? If you factor in the half-dozen crossover books and read them at the same time, this is actually a 4-star story. If you pull out just the 12-issue event plus these doofy VS scrawls, though, it's pretty much the same cobbled together, not-very-satisfying story that all recent Events from the Big Two are doing lately. This book doesn't stand on its own, and that's a deliberate choice by Marvel but ultimately makes for a bad experience as a single volume. Some folks like Sam may never bother to read the rest of the crossover books, and that's a damned shame because they're where this wooden toy becomes a real boy (Christos Gage notwithstanding).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    At first it seemed this was an excuse to have the two groups go at each other similar to opposed groups in the Civil War series. But, very good to higher character motivations fused with the long going legend of the Phoenix amped up the quality for me. The vibrant artwork helped, too. OVERALL GRADE: A minus

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cheese

    This is far removed from how shit I thought this was going to be. Marvel events are normally something I avoid like the plague, but this was on sale offer online so I needed something easy to read on holiday with a lot of pages. It's a terrible name for a comic for starters, but if you're a marvel geek like me it's not so bad. You get to see loads of different characters and they all get time to shine and seeing them pair up like Dr. Strange and the punisher was pretty cool. It's about the Phoen This is far removed from how shit I thought this was going to be. Marvel events are normally something I avoid like the plague, but this was on sale offer online so I needed something easy to read on holiday with a lot of pages. It's a terrible name for a comic for starters, but if you're a marvel geek like me it's not so bad. You get to see loads of different characters and they all get time to shine and seeing them pair up like Dr. Strange and the punisher was pretty cool. It's about the Phoenix. I think everyone has had enough of the Phoenix. Companies like Marvel always try to stick with something that works to avoid disappointment. Again it wasn't that bad and they did build it up through the X-men comics like messiah, utopia etc so all in all its not that bad. Worth a read if you like to see characters blowing up stuff and beating each other. Brain free fun.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    "Hey look, a giant dildo has become the Dark phoenix!" First of all, why is Cyclops' go-to move the sucker-punch? Whenever someone disagrees with him, he suddenly blasts them with his optic blasts and starts a hero vs. hero war. He did it to Wolverine, and now he's done it to Cap. Second, the art was really bad, especially on the first six issues or so. It looks like it was take your kids to work day and all of the kids got to do the art. Third, we have the problem of the story just being plain b "Hey look, a giant dildo has become the Dark phoenix!" First of all, why is Cyclops' go-to move the sucker-punch? Whenever someone disagrees with him, he suddenly blasts them with his optic blasts and starts a hero vs. hero war. He did it to Wolverine, and now he's done it to Cap. Second, the art was really bad, especially on the first six issues or so. It looks like it was take your kids to work day and all of the kids got to do the art. Third, we have the problem of the story just being plain boring. I really stopped caring long before it was over. Fourth, the "AVX VS" issues look and read like they were written for children. Maybe they were? I don't know. Do yourself a favor and just read a synopsis of this one unless you are either a masochist or you just love everything that Marvel puts out no matter what (I know you're out there...)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Damon

    As advertised, a very exciting story. Although exciting, this was not at all memorable, a lot of 'phoenix' crap and superhero fights. Glad that the story is self contained so that we won't have to see it referenced endlessly in future comics.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    This book provides some insight into the reasoning (or total lack of reasoning) that goes on in the minds of self entitled Elitist Oligarchical decision making for the general population, as two groups of 'Good Guys' go to war over who will direct the future of mankind, while destroying the lives of those they say they are doing it all for, who do not have any voice at all in the narative.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Xavier Guillaume

    Why the heck would two superhero teams that fight for good and justice pit themselves head to head in an ultimate showdown of epic proportions? Why Hope and the Phoenix of course! What I love about this book is how they take all your favorite superheroes and you get a taste of them all. You get Spider-man's antics, Cyclops's angst, Iceman's shirtless body. ;) You get the picture. There is something for everyone here! The second thing I enjoy is the story creates an interesting dilemma in which I'm Why the heck would two superhero teams that fight for good and justice pit themselves head to head in an ultimate showdown of epic proportions? Why Hope and the Phoenix of course! What I love about this book is how they take all your favorite superheroes and you get a taste of them all. You get Spider-man's antics, Cyclops's angst, Iceman's shirtless body. ;) You get the picture. There is something for everyone here! The second thing I enjoy is the story creates an interesting dilemma in which I'm unsure who to root for. Usually I just side with the good side, but who is good in this case? The X-men have the belief that Hope is the savior of mutantkind. The Avengers believe that she will cause the destruction of the entire planet. In the end, I just enjoy the ride, piecing together the plot as it comes. I strongly recommend reading the hardcover edition because it includes some extra issues that flesh out the story. Point One gives you some interesting backstory. Vs gives some delicious fight scenes, which add both humor and gravitas to the story. What seems to be the overall theme is no matter who wins, both teams lose in the end. It makes you question what it is we're fighting for, and how we're just pawns in a greater cosmic picture. Notable fights for me are Spider-man vs. Colossus and Captain America vs. Gambit. It may be cliche, but Spider-man is always a favorite to watch battle because of his witticism. The Cap and Gambit because they're in my top 5 of favorite Marvel superheroes. The other notable fight for me is between Black Widow and Magik. I never knew Black Widow spoke Russian, so it took me by surprise when the two have a tête-à-tête по-русски. The fact they include Cyrillic without translations also makes me super giddy. Puts those 2 years of Russian class to good use! It's interesting what they're saying because the dialogue is actually really cheeky and clever, which I felt added an extra dimension to the fight (no pun intended [them fighting in Limbo and all]). Overall, I strongly recommend reading this compilation if you haven't already. If you're a fan of Marvel, this story arc is really pivotal to what happens next. It's pretty much the bridge to the new Uncanny X-Men (2013), which I'm super excited to delve into. My only complaints to the authors is why the heck did you leave She-Hulk out of the fight scenes? Isn't she the strongest female on the planet? Seems kind of pivotal to the team if you ask me...Also, I think you broke some cardinal rule by having Iron Man win against Magneto. That's just ridiculous!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I am surprised and thrilled to report that I actually really enjoyed a Marvel crossover! The first one in years! Now, I don't think this comes anywhere close to the narrative force of something like House of M or the scope and plotting of something like Infinity Gauntlet, but I was very happy with this. The opening is a little concerning. The Avengers learn that the Phoenix Force is returning to earth, likely to inhabit Hope, who's been built up as the mutant messiah for a couple of years now. So I am surprised and thrilled to report that I actually really enjoyed a Marvel crossover! The first one in years! Now, I don't think this comes anywhere close to the narrative force of something like House of M or the scope and plotting of something like Infinity Gauntlet, but I was very happy with this. The opening is a little concerning. The Avengers learn that the Phoenix Force is returning to earth, likely to inhabit Hope, who's been built up as the mutant messiah for a couple of years now. So they confront the X-Men about this, of course. What follows is a very dumb fight that just reads like a bunch of nerds in a comic shop talking about "who would win, Magneto or Iron Man?" "Duh, Magneto, bro." "Yeah but what if Iron Man changed the polarity of his suit?!" "Durrrrr I don't know." Also, at this point, the X-Men are very clearly the bad guys, with no moral leg to stand on, which makes you solely root for the Avengers. Luckily, this kind of nonsense goes out the window pretty fast in favor of a much richer story. I will say, like most crossovers, this is pretty much all plot. There are so many characters and so much going on that they can't really stop for much character development (this probably happens in the supplemental stories in other books). But for a slam-bang action fest, this really works. The stakes continue to heighten throughout, it becomes less clear who's right and who's wrong, and things genuinely seem pretty dire for several of our heroes over the course of the story. Also, in these big crossovers, anyone's fair game to die, so that fact adds to the tension here. I found myself flying through this much faster than, say Fear Itself or Siege (two recent events that were pretty lackluster overall), excited to see where the story took me. You could do way worse than this, in terms of major comics events! And hey, maybe that doesn't sound like high praise, but I'll take what I can get.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    So, I had to jump on the crossover madness, and even though I've often been a fan of Bendis, there was just too much going on for me to care. I was slightly interested in the phoenix storyline because I've never read any of the previous incarnations, but it was such a mess that I wondered what I was doing in this little sidequest of a comic. I could have been reading Hulk or more Wolverine-Prof-X, both of which I was really getting into. Call this a learning experience. Move on.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Dalton

    Not really worth all the effort I think. So glad I did not buy each issue. The whole story could have been compressed into just a couple of issues.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elin the Lightship

    Oh boy oh boy where do I even begin? This was a mess. Reading everything I actually liked it and how the big crossover tied some loose ends together. Mostly satisfied about Hope and Wanda's part in this and how they developed and things made more sense. But the first half... I seriously considered to put it down and not finish it at several points. Everyone, and I mean EVERYONE was acting like stupid, immature, trigger-happy douchebags. When things were actually quite simple to solve, just through Oh boy oh boy where do I even begin? This was a mess. Reading everything I actually liked it and how the big crossover tied some loose ends together. Mostly satisfied about Hope and Wanda's part in this and how they developed and things made more sense. But the first half... I seriously considered to put it down and not finish it at several points. Everyone, and I mean EVERYONE was acting like stupid, immature, trigger-happy douchebags. When things were actually quite simple to solve, just through talking, Captain America and Cyclops seemed like small boys fighting over the same toy - it's only solution being violence. "I WANT TO BE IN CHARGE AND I DECIDE HOW THINGS SHOULD BE" "NO YOU DON'T, I DO, OR ELSE..." *epic fights all over the place and no one really knows why* Then the Phoenix comes and things change completely. I will not spoil how but things work out, everything is perfect but nooooo "THEY CAN'T HAVE THIS AMOUNT OF POWER, WE NEED TO TAKE THEM DOWN FOR NO PARTICULAR REASON OTHER THAN THAT WE ARE BORED." And of course thing escalate to catastrophic levels in no time, everyone's mind being to easily corrupted by power och pure stupidity. This totally makes me sound like a nice pacifist and I actually know that they could solve this easily by just talking through it calmly. But what story would that make? You go Marvel, get rid of everyone's common sense, put in some violence, pure STUPID and a Cosmic Great Power - we have a story, folks. Going to take a break in my Marvel-comics now for a while until everything with the reboot is settled. Even though this could open up for a totally new and exciting era for the X-Men. But so close to the reboot, I doubt it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    A promising start, but after a couple of chapters it's clear where this is heading, it's not really the Avengers vs. X-Men, but Avengers vs. Phoenix Force. So all the typical hype that goes with these Marvel events, and we don't even get what is says on the title. Grrrr, HULK SMASH. By the midpoint, the story get's confusing, that's some kind of achievement considering how thin the plot is. There is no meat to the story beyond the WWE style smash up, and disappointing when you look at the guys w A promising start, but after a couple of chapters it's clear where this is heading, it's not really the Avengers vs. X-Men, but Avengers vs. Phoenix Force. So all the typical hype that goes with these Marvel events, and we don't even get what is says on the title. Grrrr, HULK SMASH. By the midpoint, the story get's confusing, that's some kind of achievement considering how thin the plot is. There is no meat to the story beyond the WWE style smash up, and disappointing when you look at the guys who wrote this. Jason Aaron (Marvel's best wordmeister), Bendis, Brubaker and many more, maybe that's the fault, just too many writers. Reason for this lies in a basic fault. This fault is in an almost every comic-mega-event, you have read to about 100 hundred other issues to get the complete picture of happenings. And, yeah there will be a 1000 page companion book coming out next year, and a gullible fanboys will buy that, yes...i mean me. All the other issues in this collection, besides the main story, are somewhat silly, you get all the individual mini-battles, and they are below the average stuff, and unnecessary. Why to give 3 stars? 2 for the beginning of the story, one for the great art, i can't give a negative review when John Romita Jr. is involved + Olivier Coipel, and Adam Kubert are always welcome. I can recommend this only for the completionist X-men fans.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    It looks like the reviews of this are pretty mixed, but I thought it was actually really fun. It felt sprawling and epic, the characters had interesting things to do, the stakes were high, and the art was excellent. Jason Aaron's chapter 4 was written extremely poorly, and there was a giant timejump in the middle that felt like something was missing, but those gripes didn't complicate the rest of the story. It did feel a bit choppy at times, and I could definitely see where pieces that probably It looks like the reviews of this are pretty mixed, but I thought it was actually really fun. It felt sprawling and epic, the characters had interesting things to do, the stakes were high, and the art was excellent. Jason Aaron's chapter 4 was written extremely poorly, and there was a giant timejump in the middle that felt like something was missing, but those gripes didn't complicate the rest of the story. It did feel a bit choppy at times, and I could definitely see where pieces that probably took place in other titles were impacting the text in small ways, but overall this felt cohesive and final -- a crossover that built on the last several years' worth of crossovers, without being too steeped in continuity for the uninitiated (as I know, since I haven't read at least half of the books that led up to this one.) An event that delivers what it promises, and is a good meaty read of ridiculous proportions. I plan on picking up Vs. next, just to revel in more in-depth exploration of the punching that went into this story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    It was an ambitious story that was done pretty well. Just not well enough. There are some really good parts I liked a lot. But a complete cohesive story...not so much. These stories are practically destined to be OK or just plain bad. They rely on a shallow concept and then try to shoehorn a story in somehow. But I'm enough of an old school X-Man fan to care :)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hasham Rasool

    Alhamdulillah I loved it. I hope there will be Avengers VS X-Men TV/film series in the future. Inshallah. There were lots of action in this comic.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charlos

    What a mess. Save yourself some time and just play Marvel vs. Capcom instead. It's more fun, and the plot you generate will be equally as meaningful.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    That kind of sucked. Marvel, it's time to slow down with the big crossover events. They can be fun. They can be REALLY fun. But part of the fun is that you don't go from one huge crossover to another. You have to give us some time. However, it seems like you insist. So maybe we could lay some ground rules that I think would be mutually beneficial? 1. Let's try to have the maximum number of characters in their default state when it comes to these huge crossovers. What I mean is that we have these bi That kind of sucked. Marvel, it's time to slow down with the big crossover events. They can be fun. They can be REALLY fun. But part of the fun is that you don't go from one huge crossover to another. You have to give us some time. However, it seems like you insist. So maybe we could lay some ground rules that I think would be mutually beneficial? 1. Let's try to have the maximum number of characters in their default state when it comes to these huge crossovers. What I mean is that we have these big events, so for the most part they aren't about one or even a handful of characters. They focus on a dozen or even more. What I'm asking is that we do our level best here to try and have those characters be in their most recognizable form. Classic example: the Captain American and the Avengers beat-em-up arcade game. Awesome game, players could be Captain America, Iron Man, Hawkeye, or...the all-beige, Speedo-wearing version of Vision? What the hell? It was unfortunate, but the game came out during a period when the Vision looked like that instead of like this: Okay, maybe not the raddest costume. But it was the one we all liked, and part of the fun in the game was being these cool characters. So it's a real shame when I have to play weird albino Speedo man instead of, you know, killer android. In Avengers vs. X-Men, we have a few of these going on. Most notable is the Red Hulk, who is not actually the Hulk but a guy who really hates the Hulk. We don't need to get into it here, but the point is, the dude's not the Hulk, and I want the goddamn Hulk. Real Hulk shows up later, but by then it's only more confusing. Or Colossus. Who is apparently possessed by the Crimson Gem of Cytorrak. You don't need to know what that means, but it does make a great declaration in the workplace ("By the crimson gem of Cytorrak!"). 2. Can we make these stories so that we don't have to assume one character becomes a complete, unmitigated dick? Because that's what happens a lot. In order for these good guys to fight each other, someone has to start acting like a real ass. It was Iron Man in Civil War, and it's Cyclops here. I mean, they start out okay. Iron Man just wanted some good stuff to happen....theennnnnn started putting people in an interdimensional prison. Cyclops just wanted to protect a child....thennnnn he mostly focused on burning people alive. It just doesn't make sense. One character always ends up so hardline that it completely denies everything that's happened before. For some reason, it just doesn't seem possible for folks to write a story where one can see both sides of an issue and understand why both parties might start punching each other and destroying flying aircraft carriers. 3. Give me someone to care about. I know, it's my own fault. Comics storylines and characters are like the law. Knowing the law is your responsibility. But in this case, Hope Summers, a girl who I gather was a baby born sometime after one of the last couple big crossovers, who was then raised in the future(?) by Cable(?) and taught to survive some kind of apocalypse(?) Again, you don't need to know anything about that beyond the fact that it has spawned what I consider to be one of the most hilarious X-Men images of all time: Anyway, just not someone that I really care about. Sorry. And if I don't care about the focus of all this, or more importantly don't even really know anything about her or understand what she is, it's tough for me to care. I'm not saying it's always got to be Wolverine or Captain America. But if you're going deep, you'd better give me some solid character moments with this person in order for me to be on board. ~ Overall, the crossover thing is killing me a little bit. There are always great moments. But for the most part, the drama getting there doesn't add much to the moment. Which is really sad because these are the sorts of things that should be enhanced by the rest of the story building to them. That, to me, is the whole idea behind a mega crossover event. And that's what they are almost always missing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rajiv

    Avengers vs. X-Men, simply put, was one of the better Marvel events I have ever read. The story is told at a quick pace from the get go, and it is told in a quick, concise manner that doesn't waste your time with melodrama. The art is brilliant, too; in fact, there were moments when I'd simply stop and just admire the great artwork. The fight scenes are cut from the main issues, but they are available in AVX VS, which is a "fight book" that I enjoyed a lot. I am currently following AVX: Consequenc Avengers vs. X-Men, simply put, was one of the better Marvel events I have ever read. The story is told at a quick pace from the get go, and it is told in a quick, concise manner that doesn't waste your time with melodrama. The art is brilliant, too; in fact, there were moments when I'd simply stop and just admire the great artwork. The fight scenes are cut from the main issues, but they are available in AVX VS, which is a "fight book" that I enjoyed a lot. I am currently following AVX: Consequences, which is turning out to be even more interesting than the actual story line itself. If you're looking for a quick read and like the Avengers and the X-Men, you will not go wrong with this. As stated before, this is one of the better Marvel events in recent history.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    This is the big one. The REALLY big one. I'm sure fanboys all over the net have been wishing for this for years, and it's finally here. The two biggest super-teams in the Marvel Universe, finally going head-to-head. With the mutant race on the verge of extinction, and the team divided in two, things look bleak for the X-Men. But when the cosmic Phoenix Force returns to Earth in search of a new host, Cyclops believes that Hope Summers, the so-called 'mutant messiah', can use its power to spark the This is the big one. The REALLY big one. I'm sure fanboys all over the net have been wishing for this for years, and it's finally here. The two biggest super-teams in the Marvel Universe, finally going head-to-head. With the mutant race on the verge of extinction, and the team divided in two, things look bleak for the X-Men. But when the cosmic Phoenix Force returns to Earth in search of a new host, Cyclops believes that Hope Summers, the so-called 'mutant messiah', can use its power to spark the re-emergence of mutantkind. Unfortunately, the Avengers believe that the Phoenix's return will spell doom for Earth, and set out to stop the X-Men. This one was always going to be controversial. As with most events, this has tie-ins, and one of the main tie-ins is the 'fight book' (somewhat confusingly titled AvX: VS), filled with lots of little one-on-one fight scenes. While I really can't see the appeal of reading a bunch of issues comprised purely of fight scenes, I suppose in a way it shows restraint to have done this, as it means the main book isn't bogged down by them. But even so, the main AvX book is still a slugfest. The first chapter waits a little while before devolving too quickly into the super-clichéd let's-all-fight-each-other-rather-than-talking-reasonably angle, and from then on the story just goes in circles for a couple of issues, with the Avengers rushing to catch up to the X-Men, and then the X-Men rushing to catch up to the Avengers, with lots of fighting on the way. I'm not saying some of the fights weren't interesting (I particularly liked Captain America vs Gambit, Psylocke vs Daredevil, and bizarrely, Iron Man vs Magneto) but it gets old fast. Thankfully, this peters out after the Phoenix arrives. AvX is pretty long book compared to some of the more recent events but manages to pack in a fair amount of story. But this doesn't erase the fact that the story is stupid. Avengers vs X-Men could have been so much more, if not for the simple fact that that it just isn't as clever or complex as it could have been. One of the reasons I like Civil War so much is the moral greyness at the heart of the story: this story had none of that. Instead, there's a pretty obvious bias given to the Avengers, who are portrayed, reasonably enough, as the good guys in the argument. There's a good example of what I'm talking about halfway into the plot. The Phoenix Five have transformed the world and eradicated conflict, but the Avengers are still resisting, and Beast quits the Avengers, angry that they're still, even now, trying to oppose the X-Men and upset the new world order. It could have been a good moment. But the X-Men are fundamentally in the wrong here; what they have established is a police state, not a utopia. The moment falls completely flat; there's no moral dilemma here, no matter how badly the writers wanted there to be, and no real question as to who's in the right. It's this issue that prevents AvX from having much emotional resonance: ultimately, it's a pretty flat story from start to finish. I didn't really know what to make of the Phoenix Five. I quite liked the way they set about fixing some of the world's problems, like famine and renewable energy. I just couldn't fathom why they didn't try and bring back all the mutants. You know, like they were trying to do in the first place. The word from the author was that they weren't powerful enough to do it but he forgot to include a line saying so, but it still seems like a fairly massive oversight. Also, I was a little confused why Cyclops seemed to get Jean's powers when he had part of the Phoenix in him. Has the Phoenix always done that? Either way, Bendis seems to have rewritten some of the continuity around the Phoenix and tied it up into the whole chaos magic thing. For some reason, the Phoenix seems to exist in a yin-yang relationship with Wanda's powers. And somehow Iron Fist is involved? (Which was cool, but...) Whatever, it's probably pointless to think about it too heavily, but you can definitely see some scissor marks in the writing. The scene where Captain America seeks out the Hulk to ask for his aid is really cool, but the Hulk... punches Emma Frost once, and that's about it. I liked the ending, however: it's good to see all the mutant's powers return. Admittedly, it was sad, but the death of Professor X wasn't all that shocking. It's been done before and the fact that Cyclops did it is kind of undermined by the fact he was under the influence of the Phoenix. It's made clear repeatedly that the Phoenix Five remained in control of their actions because they were only channelling a fraction of its power. So when Cyclops absorbed 100% of the Phoenix, he shouldn't have been in control, so... Once again, it's probably best not to think too deeply about this. And to be honest, that really sums up AvX for me. Entertaining stuff, not out-and-out bad, but not particularly sharp or clever. I didn't hate it, but it's certainly not a favourite. I would say it's required reading for the current continuity, but to be honest it really isn't: you'll be able to pick things up well enough without it. This is one for diehard fans.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Craig Maxwell

    This was such a great instalment! Mainly because one of my favourite characters Emma Frost had one of the leading roles! From about half way in it really takes off, and I had to finish it in that sitting! A great read and some of the illustrations are just incredible!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael Church

    I'm going to go against the grain here, I know. I loved this book. Did it have the deepest plot? No. Was it something that changed the way comics will be written and created for years to come? No. Well, sort of. It's got a lot of impact on a lot of characters. First off, I approached this like I approached the Avengers movie: as a fanboy. If you have any appreciation for Marvel characters and books whatsoever, this premise alone should have you absolutely salivating. I've heard people complain t I'm going to go against the grain here, I know. I loved this book. Did it have the deepest plot? No. Was it something that changed the way comics will be written and created for years to come? No. Well, sort of. It's got a lot of impact on a lot of characters. First off, I approached this like I approached the Avengers movie: as a fanboy. If you have any appreciation for Marvel characters and books whatsoever, this premise alone should have you absolutely salivating. I've heard people complain that there was too much background to learn before being able to read this, but I disagree. There were plenty of hints and reviews to help casual readers come up to speed. On the exact flip side, the fact that this has been led up to since "Avengers: Disassembled" is incredible! It's not like Brian Michael Bendis and the others looked at each other in December of 2011 and were like "Hey, you know what would be great..." This book was planned. It influenced the Marvel universe for years before it happened, and it will continue to influence it for a long time. Beyond all of the action and the amazing sprawling artwork that is featured on page after gorgeous page, there really is something to this book. As an avid X-Men fan, I see more of those repercussions than I do for the Avengers side of the book, so that's where my focus will lay. This is a transformative book for Cyclops. He's been on a path to move fully away from Xavier's ideals and moving toward something a bit murkier, something which became apparent in Messiah Complex and Second Coming and which was driven home in Schism. To see this finally come to what was the clear destination is incredibly exciting. This character, and many of those around him, will never be the same again. My one gripe, and maybe this is just because I'm such a Cyclops/X-Men fan, is that the whole thing seems to be the Avengers' fault. If they'd just stepped back a bit, it's possible none of the destruction would have happened. It's actually very funny because Spider-Man says in the first battle something about "Remember when superheroes used to run into each other and there'd just be some misunderstanding and then they'd go fight the bad guy? I miss the old days." It's cute because it winds up really happening in this book, but not in a traditional sense. Regardless, the conflict is a bit forced, but it's epic and believable all the same. There are also a lot of supporting factors which contribute to this being a great book. First and foremost are the supporting books. All of the tie-ins give focus to other characters and teams (while the main books have a lot of Cyclops and Captain America). While that isn't technically anything about this book, it certainly adds value to see Wolverine having a great moment with one of his students before leaving to do what he sees as protecting the school, even though the student sees it very differently. Just some really great opportunities for the talent across Marvel to showcase what they can do (though there are some titles which fall flat, the overall effect is positive). What's more, there are added features available, such as the AR panels which provide additional background on the development of the book. I don't recommend trying to do any of that while you read through for the first time, but if you're able to enjoy it as much as I have, it certainly warrants a second look to see all of the extra content. It's like the special features on a movie. You don't watch something for the first time with the commentary turned on, you wait until it's an old favorite and you want to see more about a beloved story. Anyway, I had an incredible time with this book. It is the most fun I've had with comics since I started back into them, and I cannot wait to see what it will yield in the new titles to come from Marvel NOW! and I can't wait to revisit the book as more tie-in titles are released and I try to see how everything fits into the overarching story.

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