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HBR's 10 Must Reads on Strategic Marketing

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NEW from the bestselling HBR’s 10 Must Reads series. Stop pushing products—and start cultivating relationships with the right customers. If you read nothing else on marketing that delivers competitive advantage, read these 10 articles. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you reinvent yo NEW from the bestselling HBR’s 10 Must Reads series. Stop pushing products—and start cultivating relationships with the right customers. If you read nothing else on marketing that delivers competitive advantage, read these 10 articles. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you reinvent your marketing by putting it—and your customers—at the center of your business. Leading experts such as Ted Levitt and Clayton Christensen provide the insights and advice you need to: • Figure out what business you’re really in • Create products that perform the jobs people need to get done • Get a bird’s-eye view of your brand’s strengths and weaknesses • Tap a market that’s larger than China and India combined • Deliver superior value to your B2B customers • End the war between sales and marketing Looking for more Must Read articles from Harvard Business Review? Check out these titles in the popular series: HBR’s 10 Must Reads: The Essentials HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Communication HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Collaboration HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Innovation HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Leadership HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Making Smart Decisions HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing Yourself HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Teams


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NEW from the bestselling HBR’s 10 Must Reads series. Stop pushing products—and start cultivating relationships with the right customers. If you read nothing else on marketing that delivers competitive advantage, read these 10 articles. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you reinvent yo NEW from the bestselling HBR’s 10 Must Reads series. Stop pushing products—and start cultivating relationships with the right customers. If you read nothing else on marketing that delivers competitive advantage, read these 10 articles. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you reinvent your marketing by putting it—and your customers—at the center of your business. Leading experts such as Ted Levitt and Clayton Christensen provide the insights and advice you need to: • Figure out what business you’re really in • Create products that perform the jobs people need to get done • Get a bird’s-eye view of your brand’s strengths and weaknesses • Tap a market that’s larger than China and India combined • Deliver superior value to your B2B customers • End the war between sales and marketing Looking for more Must Read articles from Harvard Business Review? Check out these titles in the popular series: HBR’s 10 Must Reads: The Essentials HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Communication HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Collaboration HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Innovation HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Leadership HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Making Smart Decisions HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing Yourself HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Teams

30 review for HBR's 10 Must Reads on Strategic Marketing

  1. 5 out of 5

    Visnja Zeljeznjak

    This compilation of best strategic marketing advice consists of the following articles: Rethinking Marketing - https://hbr.org/2010/01/rethinking-ma... Branding in the Digital Age - https://hbr.org/2010/12/branding-in-t... Marketing Myopia - https://hbr.org/2004/07/marketing-myopia Marketing Malpractice: The Cause and the Cure - https://hbr.org/2005/12/marketing-mal... The Brand Report Card - https://hbr.org/2000/01/the-brand-rep... The Female Economy - https://hbr.org/2009/09/the-female-ec... Custome This compilation of best strategic marketing advice consists of the following articles: Rethinking Marketing - https://hbr.org/2010/01/rethinking-ma... Branding in the Digital Age - https://hbr.org/2010/12/branding-in-t... Marketing Myopia - https://hbr.org/2004/07/marketing-myopia Marketing Malpractice: The Cause and the Cure - https://hbr.org/2005/12/marketing-mal... The Brand Report Card - https://hbr.org/2000/01/the-brand-rep... The Female Economy - https://hbr.org/2009/09/the-female-ec... Customer Value Propositions in Business Markets - https://hbr.org/2006/03/customer-valu... Getting Brand Communities Right - https://hbr.org/2009/04/getting-brand... The One Number You Need to Grow - https://hbr.org/2003/12/the-one-numbe... Ending the War Between Sales and Marketing - https://hbr.org/2006/07/ending-the-wa... I've listened to the audio version and I'd listen to another HBR "10 Must Reads" compilation again. They're very well selected, and easy to follow. I particularly liked the evergreen marketing advice in: - Customer Value Propositions in Business Markets - Marketing Malpractice: The Cause and the Cure - Marketing Myopia - The One Number You Need to Grow (this one is about the Net Promoter Score, something Silicon Valley startups have widely adopted as the one and only predictor of growth). I'm glad I've purchased this title because I don't think I'd ever read the text articles.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mindaugas Cekauskas

    Good to freshen up on some of the classics, but otherwise a bit outdated.. nearly all the articles are at least 10 years old, making examples hardly relevant.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    • Value proposition should be simple and powerfully captivating at the same time • Superior on the few elements that matter most to target customers • Show points of difference directly related to the needs of the customers • Compare with competition. Show in simple terms why you are better than competition • Back up all your claims (reviews, recommendations) • Invest time in understanding customer unique requirements and preferences • Brand report card- a tool showing how your brand stacks up on the • Value proposition should be simple and powerfully captivating at the same time • Superior on the few elements that matter most to target customers • Show points of difference directly related to the needs of the customers • Compare with competition. Show in simple terms why you are better than competition • Back up all your claims (reviews, recommendations) • Invest time in understanding customer unique requirements and preferences • Brand report card- a tool showing how your brand stacks up on the 10 traits shared by the world’s strongest brands • How consistent are your marketing messages? • Understand why customers hire you or your product. What is the purpose? • Milk shake- breakfast, as to distract children • With a few exceptions, every job people need or want to do has a social, a functional, and an emotional dimension • Understand what is the target stage in the decision journey you want to influence and use appropriate channels • Marketing data should be tracked at differing levels- aggregate, segments, individual (customer life time value) • Customer equity is a good proxy for company value • Customers can suffer from feature fatigue, which hurts future sales • CRM must be analyzed by departments responsible for customers • The best CRM managers should have a broad training in social sciences and marketing • Rotation – everyone should be rooted to reality. Spend a week working in stores • Chief Customer Officer – responsible for designing and executing the firm’s customer relationship strategy and overseeing all customer facing functions • Tailor products to customer events- birthdays, wedding celebrations, etc • Engage with customers in two-way communication. Building relationships • Cultivation of a customer rather than pushing a product is an objective of a company

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vishal Kale

    On Strategic Marketing" is one of the Harvard Business Review's 10 must read series. The book contains papers and articles from the 1970s upto the current day, and looks at various aspects of marketing. To the average manager, the book acts as an tool that stimulates thought, and is a delight to read. To the avid strategy student, the book in question leaves one desiring for more. This represents the first HBR Book I have read, and it was worth it, despite some disappointments. I would, personall On Strategic Marketing" is one of the Harvard Business Review's 10 must read series. The book contains papers and articles from the 1970s upto the current day, and looks at various aspects of marketing. To the average manager, the book acts as an tool that stimulates thought, and is a delight to read. To the avid strategy student, the book in question leaves one desiring for more. This represents the first HBR Book I have read, and it was worth it, despite some disappointments. I would, personally have loved a more detailed research backed by charts and numbers, or examples; but the content, as it currently stands, is sufficiently engaging, intuitively reasonable and deeply thought provoking for it to be worth a read. The one thing that hit me the hardest was the examples in the book were all American {Obviously!}, which left me wanting some top-quality research on the Indian Market and its realities, which would have made the content far more powerful...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I love all the HBR "Must Read" books and this one is no exception. It genuinely is a must read for anyone working in marketing or product marketing (like myself). Many of the articles/ essays are fairly recent, but there is one originally published in 1960! It's incredible how relevant it still is. That particular essay focused on the "myth of the growth industry". I got a lot out of this read and highly recommend it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    HBR’s strategic marketing articles describe what is common practice in today’s marketing world. Therefore most modern companies use techniques as described in this book to achieve better market performance. Articles range chronologically from the 1960ies to the mid 00s but the message always feels relevant. A good primer for the MBA student.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    Extremely cogent and well-documented analysis of marketing trends, at least according to my lights. Had a difficult time believing that one of the articles, written in the 1960's, could still be so entirely relevant to today's market. Highly recommended read for design or data-oriented thinkers.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    Very basic and in my personal opinion touching on a surface the topic.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    read for a class, nice, simple just detailed enough to give you an overview of the topics. perfect for a classroom

  10. 5 out of 5

    San

    All the articles are almost 10 years old. It still have some good points that still nowadays many companies should apply to their marketing strategies.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ocean Gebhardt

    Definitely some gems in this book. Marketing Myopia and The One Number You Need to Grow were probably the best articles in here. The Brand Report Card and Marketing Malpractice were excellent as well.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laylalk

    Stimulating reads but found many of the articles dated and blurring the lines between sales support and true marketing. Worth the read but not entirely relevant for many progressive companies in 2016.

  13. 5 out of 5

    PS Chua

    High-level strategy concepts that is suitable for C-level executives or entrepreneurs. Very practical though with diagrams, checklists and summaries in every chapters for a quick read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dude-von Dudenstein

    absolute gem, particularly pay attention to marketing myopia. I work for Google and most of the anecdotes are so true within my company.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zach S.

    8 out of the 10 articles were absolute winners, and the other two held some good insights as well.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joe Murphy

    Great supplement to our Strategic Marketing Management course

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jess Kang

    The marketing insights are so far-reaching..

  18. 4 out of 5

    John R. Romero

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hilal Dalilar

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Zhao

  21. 5 out of 5

    Justin Withrow

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Azzab

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nijs Wienese

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alon Alroy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nick Kulikaev

  27. 5 out of 5

    Madhur Srivastava

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paulo Moinhos

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joe Taveras

  30. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Castrup

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