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Tik-Tok of Oz

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Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glendda the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. In Tik-Tok of Oz Ann Soforth, the Queen of Oogaboo, a small valley in the Land of Oz, decides to c Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glendda the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. In Tik-Tok of Oz Ann Soforth, the Queen of Oogaboo, a small valley in the Land of Oz, decides to conquer the world by creating an army from the eighteen men she rules. This is a 1914 sequel to The Patchwork Girl of Oz. For grades 4-7.


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Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glendda the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. In Tik-Tok of Oz Ann Soforth, the Queen of Oogaboo, a small valley in the Land of Oz, decides to c Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glendda the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. In Tik-Tok of Oz Ann Soforth, the Queen of Oogaboo, a small valley in the Land of Oz, decides to conquer the world by creating an army from the eighteen men she rules. This is a 1914 sequel to The Patchwork Girl of Oz. For grades 4-7.

30 review for Tik-Tok of Oz

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    Ann Soforth is a Queen of a tiny Kingdom which is a part of Oz. One day she decided sweeping floors is below queen's dignity (her Kingdom was that small) and some conquering is in order. She conscripted practically every single man and went out to conquer and plunder. At the same time a girl named Betsy Bobbin was swept overboard from a ship just before it sank. We have no idea about who she is and what was she doing on the ship - for all we know she might have even been a part of the crew. Again at Ann Soforth is a Queen of a tiny Kingdom which is a part of Oz. One day she decided sweeping floors is below queen's dignity (her Kingdom was that small) and some conquering is in order. She conscripted practically every single man and went out to conquer and plunder. At the same time a girl named Betsy Bobbin was swept overboard from a ship just before it sank. We have no idea about who she is and what was she doing on the ship - for all we know she might have even been a part of the crew. Again at the same time Shaggy Man - who unsurprisingly reminds me of... well... Shaggy: armed with the Love Magnet meets Polychrome who got stuck in the magic land because she did not get back on the rainbow before it disappeared. At this point I experienced a severe sense of déjà vu. An army trying to conquer Oz made its appearance in The Marvelous Land of Oz. A girl who went overboard and ended up in a magic land was prominent in Ozma of Oz - it was none other than Dorothy. Shaggy Man with Love Magnet already met Polychrome who ended up in the magic land for the same reason in The Road to Oz; for some reason they do not remember meeting each other before. Can we say recycling? Sure we can! I mentioned overpopulation of Oz in my other review. New characters appear in each book and they all have to be shown thus each returning one gets less and less screen time. I think it finally became a real problem as some of the all-time favorites do not even get mentioned here - I am looking at Scarecrow and Tin Woodman. Even Ozma and Dorothy only appear in the last two chapters. Tik-Tok who gave the title to the book did not do anything even remotely exciting here except getting disabled in different ways. The things became better once the three different plot-lines started to converge. This was the reason enough for the final rating I gave - grudgingly - to the installment: 3 stars. There is a lesson here kids: even if you are a classic of children literature, if you recycle previous stories - even if they are your own - shame on you!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Mr. Baum, Mr. Baum, Mr. Baum. Really?? Don't you remember that Shaggy and Polychrome met each other and traveled together three books ago? Or that the Love Magnet doesn't need to be seen to work? And why on earth did you change the Nome King's name from Roquat to Ruggedo? Even my 9-year-old remembered that Ozma had told him his name after he drank from the Waters of Oblivion before she sent him back home through the tunnel. If Ozma has the Nome King's Magic Belt, she doesn't need the Wizard to t Mr. Baum, Mr. Baum, Mr. Baum. Really?? Don't you remember that Shaggy and Polychrome met each other and traveled together three books ago? Or that the Love Magnet doesn't need to be seen to work? And why on earth did you change the Nome King's name from Roquat to Ruggedo? Even my 9-year-old remembered that Ozma had told him his name after he drank from the Waters of Oblivion before she sent him back home through the tunnel. If Ozma has the Nome King's Magic Belt, she doesn't need the Wizard to transport people anywhere - she can do it herself. And your mental map of Oz is completely screwed up. Glinda was in the *south*, not the north. A little consistency! Is that too much to ask?! More so than the others, this book seemed to be a rehash and thrown-together bit of a bunch of stories. (For one example, Dorothy and Billina shipwrecked back in book #3, just like Betsy and Hank were in this one.) I liked the puns (Queen Ann Soforth) and the alliteration in every chapter title ("Tik-Tok Tackles a Tough Task"), but, I'm afraid, little else. For more book reviews, come visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Everything we've come to expect from an Oz book, this time with added dragons! (I love me some dragons, I do...) Also, we finally get some answers as to why Toto seems to be the only animal in Oz who can't talk! About time...

  4. 5 out of 5

    TJ✨

    Holy shit Toto talked! Review to come (maybe)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anne Langston

    I don't know, but as I read this, I wondered whether this book was originally a non Oz book that was reworked to be fit into the Oz series. There are some glaring inconsistencies--for instance, Polychrome and the Shaggy Man not only met in Road to Oz but spent most of the book in each other's company, yet neither seems to know the other in this book, the Love Magnet works differently than in Road to Oz, and for a land that's been cut off, it's remarkably easy for the inhabitants of Oz to get out I don't know, but as I read this, I wondered whether this book was originally a non Oz book that was reworked to be fit into the Oz series. There are some glaring inconsistencies--for instance, Polychrome and the Shaggy Man not only met in Road to Oz but spent most of the book in each other's company, yet neither seems to know the other in this book, the Love Magnet works differently than in Road to Oz, and for a land that's been cut off, it's remarkably easy for the inhabitants of Oz to get out to where ever the the bulk of the story takes place. And the Nome King remembers everything about his encounters with Oz but can't remember his real name. He even remembers Polychrome, although he doesn't remember that he's never met her. What I mostly noticed is that the tone of this book seems very different than other Oz books. I still like it, it just seemed a bit "one of these things is not like the other"-ish. Update: I did some research and found that Tik-Tok of Oz is based on a play called The Tik-Tok Man of Oz. Which, I guess, explains some of the continuity errors, the Shaggy Man breaking out into song in the middle of the book, and why the book at times seems like it was written by somebody else.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    I so enjoy the knowledge of the fact that Dorothy sends these stories of Oz to America via wireless telegraph. Plus, I love the fact that Baum just invented the idea of cellphones decades before any such thing was on the market. Oh, and I relish in knowing that there's an actual tree that grows books – in the land of Oz, obviously, not here. Sadly, I didn't get to see too much of Dorothy (or Toto, for that matter). And on another note, I'm really getting tired of the Shaggy Man's love I so enjoy the knowledge of the fact that Dorothy sends these stories of Oz to America via wireless telegraph. Plus, I love the fact that Baum just invented the idea of cellphones decades before any such thing was on the market. Oh, and I relish in knowing that there's an actual tree that grows books – in the land of Oz, obviously, not here. Sadly, I didn't get to see too much of Dorothy (or Toto, for that matter). And on another note, I'm really getting tired of the Shaggy Man's love magnet. HOWEVER, THE STORY IS COMPLETELY REDEEMED... When Toto (in the short moment that he makes an appearance) does something so unexpected, something I've wanted for SO LONG... IT HAPPENS!!!!! And so this title gets 5 stars from me – because of the wonderful and blissful event.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tra-Kay

    Certainly the worst of the first eight Oz books, and I only don't include the ones thereafter because I haven't read them. Was it written by a disinterested ghostwriter? Where are the creativity and party dynamic? The first third of the book is a dull exercise in assembling the characters; you can almost see Baum (was it really you?!) checking them off a list. Many elements, from plot to characters, are lifeless rehashes. I also remember loving Tik-Tok when he was first discovered and wound up, Certainly the worst of the first eight Oz books, and I only don't include the ones thereafter because I haven't read them. Was it written by a disinterested ghostwriter? Where are the creativity and party dynamic? The first third of the book is a dull exercise in assembling the characters; you can almost see Baum (was it really you?!) checking them off a list. Many elements, from plot to characters, are lifeless rehashes. I also remember loving Tik-Tok when he was first discovered and wound up, but there is little fun to him here in his titular book. Tik-Tok of Oz is an all-around dustmagnet that does disservice to the series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alena

    Best part of this story, written in 1914, was when Ozma called the Shaggy Man on a "wireless telephone", a device invented by the Wizard that allowed them to converse with perfect ease without a wire connection. Yes, the Wizard invented cellphones. Crazy!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mareklamo

    Even roses can be misogynists.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shoshana

    This is actually one of my favorites, but it only gets four (or 4.5?) stars for a few reasons. One of them is the recurring gendered nature of styles of foolishness. I am referring to Ann Soforth choosing to conscript the men of Oogaboo into an army and conquer the world, much the same way Jellia Jamb conscripted an army of girls to conquer the Emerald City back in The Land of Oz, their motivations being they are tired of housework. Which could be a feminist kind of thing, except it's not. They' This is actually one of my favorites, but it only gets four (or 4.5?) stars for a few reasons. One of them is the recurring gendered nature of styles of foolishness. I am referring to Ann Soforth choosing to conscript the men of Oogaboo into an army and conquer the world, much the same way Jellia Jamb conscripted an army of girls to conquer the Emerald City back in The Land of Oz, their motivations being they are tired of housework. Which could be a feminist kind of thing, except it's not. They're both presented as foolishly stepping out of their places - they should be happy at home. Ann's army is not a serious threat to anyone, and we all know that it's ludicrous of the Nome King to take them seriously even for a second. (This is because women belong at home, not conquering the world.) When men (like the Nome King) lead armies in the Oz books, they are threatening. And it's a weird thing, because for the most part, Baum is pretty good at having active female characters - Dorothy, Betsy, Ozma-who-was-Tip, Scraps, Eureka and the Glass Cat - with agency and unique personalities. Although so far in the series the human and fairy girls are all super pretty. Like, that's all we hear about, is how Ozma is so pretty, and Glinda is so pretty, and the Rose Princess is so pretty, and Polychrome is even prettier, and Dorothy is also fairly pretty, and together they're the prettiest girls ever, and they wear the prettiest clothes, they're so pretty. Because prettiness is a requirement for benevolently powerful women - if they're ugly, they're bad witches, like the Wicked Witch of the West and (in the next book, which I've read already because I'm behind on my reviews) old Blinkie. Also Eureka and the Glass Cat are vain, but Toto and the Woozy are affable. The Sawhorse is vain, but it's about his abilities rather than his looks. I guess that's also partly an old-fashioned thing and partly a writing-for-children thing, but it still bothers me. Anyway, now to what I liked, because I liked a lot. And honestly, he's better on gender than many contemporary authors. I like that the fiercest guy in Oogaboo is a reader who grows book trees. Although also he's kind of a tool - "when we return to Oogaboo, I'll take all the marbles away from the children and melt them up and make, a marble statue of myself for all to look upon and admire." But of course he does refuse to attack the helpless ladies, so, uh, that's good. I really enjoy the Rak, and also the bit that essentially his punch line. Let's count the ways people have gotten to Oz: 1. tornado 2. (everyone is already there) 3. deliberately, via magic carpet - after being washed overboard in a storm 4. deliberately, via magic belt - after falling into the ground in an earthquake 5. deliberately, via sand boat - after getting lost on the road to Butterfield 6. deliberately, via magic belt 7. (everyone is already there) 8. deliberately, via magic belt - after being washed overboard in a storm That was fun. Baum is leaning toward the washed overboard in a storm trend; he's used it twice in 8 books. That is 25% of the time! I'll keep you updated as I proceed through the series. P.S. I can't believe he blew up Betsy's whole freaking ship and sank it. That is a lot of people dying! But of course this is not dwelled on. Here's another thing Baum likes: picking plant person rulers when they have deliberately been left on the bush by their people. It happens in Dorothy and the Wizard with the Mangaboos and now in Tik-Tok with the Rose People. Maybe he thought he didn't explore the concept fully the first time. This is the book where Roquat is renamed Ruggedo. Baum explains that he forgot his name after drinking the Waters of Oblivion, but I'm pretty sure Baum just didn't like the name and wanted a chance to pick a new one. Also, question: I thought the Nome King could do no magic without the magic belt. But suddenly in this book he can do spells! Did he go learn from somebody? Or what? I love the part where Tik-Tok negotiates his salary. I love that when they're talking to the Private Citizen, everyone is like, "oh! you're Ti-ti-ti Hoo-choo! Of course!" because obviously they've all heard of him? I have always loved the maidens of light - I mean, as a kid I thought this was the most wonderful thing. I like the three-course nuts! I want them to grow in my garden! They are like the lunch and dinner pails from Ozma of Oz, it seems to be - yet a third concept he revisits a second time in this book! I don't understand why sometimes Ozma can wish people around with the magic belt and sometimes she has to rely on the Wizard to do a spell or ask Glinda to do stuff for her. There seems to be no logic to the system, except for Baum sometimes realizing that the magic belt is too easy. I really like that Baum has thought of the wireless telephone already in like 1910. I love the surprise about Toto! As I said, this is one of my favorites. P.S. Shaggy is still kind of obnoxious, especially in his behavior to Poly.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    Thanks to my buddy, we are slowly working our way through the entire Oz collection. I enjoyed this adventure with Tik-Tok and the gang. Met a few new friends along the way. Always happy in the end.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Wils Cain

    It cracks me up how he really tries to wrap up every book as the last and then he introduces the next one by very nicely saying "the kids won't leave me be." I enjoyed all the new characters and finally someone from Kansas other than Dorothy being obnoxious. The story mostly revolves around all new characters with Dorothy thrown in at the end.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    My favorite part of this book was when the Shaggy Man and Ozma talked to each other long distance using the Wizard's "wireless telephone" that he'd invented. I love it when fantasy and sci-fi predict the future. So Frank Baum actually invented the cell phone! This was another good Oz story that actually had a clear antagonist (the oft-appearing Nome King, even though his first name was different in this book). There was also a main plot: a quest to rescue the Shaggy Man's brother from My favorite part of this book was when the Shaggy Man and Ozma talked to each other long distance using the Wizard's "wireless telephone" that he'd invented. I love it when fantasy and sci-fi predict the future. So Frank Baum actually invented the cell phone! This was another good Oz story that actually had a clear antagonist (the oft-appearing Nome King, even though his first name was different in this book). There was also a main plot: a quest to rescue the Shaggy Man's brother from the Nome King. There were quite a lot of characters to keep up with in the traveling party, what with Queen Ann and her army, but Baum did a good job of focusing on just a few as the main protagonists and primary supporting characters, so remembering each and every officer in Ann's army was unimportant. My main complaint about this book was the (larger than usual) number of inconsistencies. For example, Shaggy and Polychrome shared an adventure several books ago, but in this book, they acted as if they'd never met. The ending, while not as deus ex machina as some other books, still had an element of supreme convenience, and makes the reader wonder why Ozma and the Wizard didn't step in earlier in the story. There was no mention of Ozma's Magic Belt, and she relied on the Wizard to perform all of the magic that she would normally do (though one could reason that she did this in order to give the Wizard practice, since it was mentioned that he is now an apprentice of Glinda. But still, an explanation would have been nice.) And like "The Patchwork Girl of Oz," which featured the title character but not as the main protagonist, Tik-Tok is part of the adventuring party in this book, but he's hardly the main character. In fact, I kept forgetting about him (along with Ann and her army) until he had a line or someone gave him an order. Props to Baum, though, for answering a long-time question of mine in this book. One of the inconsistencies about the magic of the world that had bugged me was that every animal from earth that ever travels to Oz (Billina the hen, the old cab horse, Hank the mule in this book, etc), is able to talk upon arriving. Except Toto. Dorothy and Toto now live in Oz, and still the dog only barks. Well, in this book, Ozma informs Dorothy that Toto can talk just like every other animal, but he simply chooses not to. Irate, Dorothy scolds him till he speaks, which he does, proving that he's been basically playing with her for all this time. Very amusing, and a quick but effective way to not only answer a world-building question, but to develop Toto as a character.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey Marie

    This has been one of the biggest disappointments in the Oz series. The story is all over the place, Baum can't decide if the Nome King deserves redemption or not, and we have a character named "Ugly One." There are two good things about this book. One, I finally figured out what it is that I don't like about Ozma. She's mean and she's a little dense. So, Ugly One is Shaggy Mans brother, and Shaggy has spent this never-ending book looking for him. Once Shaggy finds him, Ozma sends everyone back t This has been one of the biggest disappointments in the Oz series. The story is all over the place, Baum can't decide if the Nome King deserves redemption or not, and we have a character named "Ugly One." There are two good things about this book. One, I finally figured out what it is that I don't like about Ozma. She's mean and she's a little dense. So, Ugly One is Shaggy Mans brother, and Shaggy has spent this never-ending book looking for him. Once Shaggy finds him, Ozma sends everyone back to where they belong, except for Shaggy, Ugly, Betsy, and Hank because 3 of the members aren't current residents of Oz and she can't let just anyone live in Oz. Except, she quickly decides to let Betsy live there so Dorothy can have a play mate and she can't separate Betsy and Hank. But she doesn't owe anything to Ugly. I mean, she says that. But she knows that Shaggy won't come back without him, but everyone in Oz loves Shaggy. Why is this an issue? You let the Wizard stay in Oz! So finally, after everyone says that they want Ugly to come live in Oz and Ozma agrees, she has the Wizard do the magic instead of just using the Magic Belt from the stupid Nome King. I just don't like her. The other good thing in this book: Dorothy finally convinces Toto to speak. Every other animal in Oz can speak, so it didn't make sense that he couldn't. It was the fault of Dorothy not to make Toto talk sooner. I will push through and finish the series, but I'm going to take a break. This book wore me out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pink

    For a while this was going well, new characters, a new adventure, but quickly there was more of the same. Journeys through distant lands of Oz, evil characters that are easily reformed, saccharine morals and a pointless ending when everything is so easily resolved.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

    There's a movie called Return to Oz and I've always wandered about Tik Tok until I worked up to his book in the series. This is a great book especially for reading to children going to bed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Line Bookaholic

    Hilarious as usual !

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Another wonderful Oz story. They're such fun, quick reads!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tinka

    #OzAThon Book 8 I was considering giving this 2 Stars, because it‘s still very well written, but then I thought about it for a second and tried to find anything I like about this book and spoiler alert, the search was a lost cause. Good writing alone just does not make a good book. I have a lot of respect for Baum as a writer and what he accomplished, but come on, at this point he was just phoning it in for the fans. The story, if we call it that, is a jum #OzAThon Book 8 I was considering giving this 2 Stars, because it‘s still very well written, but then I thought about it for a second and tried to find anything I like about this book and spoiler alert, the search was a lost cause. Good writing alone just does not make a good book. I have a lot of respect for Baum as a writer and what he accomplished, but come on, at this point he was just phoning it in for the fans. The story, if we call it that, is a jumbled mess of characters and events coming together randomly and it’s loosely tied together. We start the novel with Ann, Queen of a very small country within Oz who decides he wants to conquer the World. Of course she does. Then we meet Betsy and her mule Hank. Those two fellas are shipwrecked in Oz and run into the Shaggy Man who is on a mission to rescue his never-heard-about-before brother, sensitively named The Ugly One, who has been kidnapped by the Nome King. For some reason. Also, something with Polychrome. Now, you might ask: "But what about Tik-Tok? The book is named after him!" Well, he is in this story, as a random side-character. Yeah, I don‘t get it either. Baum has never been great in choosing his book titles but this feels too random even for him. Why not at least call it "The Shaggy Man of Oz" because he is the only character with something resembling an arc. This book is all over the place. There is no real story, a lot of characters appear, but no one leaves and impact. It feels just very random. I did not enjoy reading it at all. Add a ton of inconsistencies to the mix as well. It seems like Baum forgot his own previous books while writing this. Some highlights include the relationship between Shaggy Man and Polychrome, how the Love Magnet works and that Ozma can use her Magic Belt to transport people everywhere. Speaking of Oz‘ ruler, my God is she irritating. Not even the usual funny Nome King could save this. First off, his name was changed because of the magic amnesia (I hate this trope) he suffered in the sixth book, but strangely he remembers everything else about his encounters with Ozians. Beats me. Inconsistencies wohooo. On a random sidenote, they finally address the issue of Toto not talking... so cookie points here, I guess? Whatever. Even reviewing this book is annoying. Easily the worst of the bunch so far.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    I think Baum must have done eeny meeny miney mo to choose the title of this book. There were so many characters, and Tik Tok didn't feature any more prominently than the others. Baum did quite well to draw the different plot lines and characters together to their common aim of defeating the nome king. Some young readers might find the early part of the book a little fragmented, but overall it was a good addition to the Oz series. I listened to the Librivox audiobook, which had terrific narration I think Baum must have done eeny meeny miney mo to choose the title of this book. There were so many characters, and Tik Tok didn't feature any more prominently than the others. Baum did quite well to draw the different plot lines and characters together to their common aim of defeating the nome king. Some young readers might find the early part of the book a little fragmented, but overall it was a good addition to the Oz series. I listened to the Librivox audiobook, which had terrific narration.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ayla

    The nome king gets his in this story, as he imprison Shaggy man's brother, and buries Tik Tok, Queen Ann and the Army of Oogaboo plan to help break him out in the hopes of getting some loot, because she wants to conquer OZ. And lo and behold Toto actually talks!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen Kay

    3.25 stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Roman Kurys

    Another journey to the fairy land of Oz, did not disappoint. It was a goofy, fun, simple tale of an adventure. Fast paced and full of action, when I flipped the cover closed, I definitely wondered why there was not a movie made after this story. This would be a pretty awesome fantasy action movie. Characters: 3 What I thought was odd, is that this story is not about Dorothy or any of the usual suspects. Instead we get a whole other girl who knows about Dorothy as a st Another journey to the fairy land of Oz, did not disappoint. It was a goofy, fun, simple tale of an adventure. Fast paced and full of action, when I flipped the cover closed, I definitely wondered why there was not a movie made after this story. This would be a pretty awesome fantasy action movie. Characters: 3 What I thought was odd, is that this story is not about Dorothy or any of the usual suspects. Instead we get a whole other girl who knows about Dorothy as a story. She gets brought over to Oz and this book is her adventure. Given that I expected some sort of a sequel, I was disappointed in the beginning but the story was solid. I think my favorite character in this book was actually Tik-Tok. For some reason out of all the characters in the book, he captured my attention. It was so bad, that i caught myself stretching the reading time for no reason by pronouncing words like I thought Tik Tak would. In his voice, that I made up for him without consciously thinking about it. Once I caught myself, i couldn’t stop laughing, but consciously continued to do that until the very end of the book. Shaggy man...is getting very annoying, I might add in conclusion. He is like...an all knowing, all saving, never stumbling super human that has the right stuff at the right time. I don’t know. Maybe there is a book just about him so I can get to know him more? Last but not least. Toto. Freaking Toto. There is not much I can say here and not spoil content. So you will just have to read it, but... yyyyyyoooooooooo. Toto!!!!! /shaking my head and then laughing uncontrollably. Plot: 3 Plot was basic, simple, and to the point. Much the same like all the previous and I suspect all the future Oz books. It was, however also fun to follow, and as usual unpredictable. After all, who knows what might happen in a fairy land of Oz, right? One thing that was missing in Oz all this time were dragons. Well, worry not. There are now dragons who are a pretty important part of the story. I was secretly hoping for a violent dragon battle as the final ending. That did not happen, so...bummer. But plot, as usual, so nothing new or any spoilers here brings us to Oz. All roads lead to Oz. Setting: 4 I rated setting higher from the other segments I usually pay attention to, simply because I have grown very fond of Oz. It is a simple tale, yes. Much like Narnia, but it is very fun to go on adventures there. If you stop to think about it for a bit, there are some good moral lessons Baum squeezed in this text. As always this is a setting of good triumphing over evil, a land full of goodness and people who get along well together. Every now and then there is one or two outliers, of course, or we wouldn’t have these adventures, but overall I come to think of Oz as a place I would love to live in and after eight books, it feels real enough to me to actually exist. Might be, all I am missing is a pair of red shoes with clicky heels. Roman “Ragnar”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Queen Ann Soforth of Oogaboo, a remote corner of the Land of Oz, sets out with her army of eighteen to conquer the world in this eighth Oz novel from L. Frank Baum. Quickly transported by Glinda the Good to the barren dominions of the Nome King, the company eventually meets up with some other travelers, in the form of shipwrecked Oklahoma girl Betsy Bobbin and Hank the mule, Ozga the dispossessed Rose Princess, the Shaggy Man, and Polychrome, the Rainbow's Daughter. Ann and her army fall in with Queen Ann Soforth of Oogaboo, a remote corner of the Land of Oz, sets out with her army of eighteen to conquer the world in this eighth Oz novel from L. Frank Baum. Quickly transported by Glinda the Good to the barren dominions of the Nome King, the company eventually meets up with some other travelers, in the form of shipwrecked Oklahoma girl Betsy Bobbin and Hank the mule, Ozga the dispossessed Rose Princess, the Shaggy Man, and Polychrome, the Rainbow's Daughter. Ann and her army fall in with the Shaggy Man's quest to rescue his long lost brother from the Nome King, and they are soon joined by the mechanical copper man Tik-Tok, whom they rescue from a well. After some adventures in a fairy-land on the other side of the world, courtesy of the Hollow Tube, they eventually do manage to make their way to the Nome King's underground stronghold where, with the help of Quox the dragon, they defeat their enemy... As many other online reviewers have noted, Baum recycles any number of characters and plot-lines in Tik-Tok of Oz, which, despite its title, is more the story of a diverse ensemble of characters, than of one alone. The girl-led army has been seen before in Oziana, in the form of General Jinjur's Army of Revolt, in The Marvelous Land of Oz (Books of Wonder) . The Shaggy Man first appeared in The Road to Oz , as did Polychrome, but their reappearance is not unusual, given Baum's fondness for bringing back his characters. Betsy Bobbin and Hank, on the other hand, are clearly inspired by Dorothy and Billina the yellow hen, who are likewise shipwrecked in Ozma of Oz , also discover Tik-Tok imprisoned and rescue him, and also become involved in an adventure opposing the terrible Nome King. That similarity of plot is not accidental, something discussed in the brief editor's note at the beginning of the edition I read. Apparently this tale began as a stage adaptation of Ozma of Oz , in which Baum was forced to change a number of the characters' names, because he had already signed away the stage rights to the real ones. Having created a slightly different adventure, with a few new characters thrown in, he then turned the stage play (The Tik-Tok Man of Oz) into an entirely new novel. Recycling indeed! Despite its lack of originality with regard to the story-line and characters, I quite enjoyed Tik-Tok of Oz, no doubt owing to the fact that the book upon which it is based, Ozma of Oz , is my favorite of the entire series. Unsurprisingly, the tale here held together fairly well, and was engaging. As always, the artwork from John R. Neill was just enchanting! Recommended to Oz fans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This is like a re-do of the original story, with a different mid-western American girl falling into Oz (with trusty animal companion) and meeting up with oddball characters and, essentially, wandering around a little. It's oddly inconsistent with the established world though, but in kind of stupid ways that seem like Baum was writing this much later and without checking things like what he had already named the Nome King or who had previously met whom, etc. I'll chalk this up to an imaginative b This is like a re-do of the original story, with a different mid-western American girl falling into Oz (with trusty animal companion) and meeting up with oddball characters and, essentially, wandering around a little. It's oddly inconsistent with the established world though, but in kind of stupid ways that seem like Baum was writing this much later and without checking things like what he had already named the Nome King or who had previously met whom, etc. I'll chalk this up to an imaginative but lazy world, which is pretty much a theme throughout all the books so far.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I loved Tik tok of Oz. It was funny and interesting. I would recommend this book to Oz lovers.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Kilgore

    Overall a very fun adventure story. It has some similarities to both Ozma and Road, and is decidedly set outside of Oz mostly but is a very enjoyable book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ira Livingston

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Overall one of my favorite stories, and actually the defeat of the Nome King (finally) seems he's the only character to be evil without true consequences until now. Shaggy Man and his love magnet seems to have lost some of its power that happens in earlier books, but what shocked me was that Toto finally talks... I was beginning to wonder if he was retarded, because every other animal in Oz could talk. Also Ozma changes some, asking the wizard to teleport people instead of Overall one of my favorite stories, and actually the defeat of the Nome King (finally) seems he's the only character to be evil without true consequences until now. Shaggy Man and his love magnet seems to have lost some of its power that happens in earlier books, but what shocked me was that Toto finally talks... I was beginning to wonder if he was retarded, because every other animal in Oz could talk. Also Ozma changes some, asking the wizard to teleport people instead of using the magic belt in earlier books. It's just a break of consistency that really hurts this book but worth the read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cocoa Bleu

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Oh my... How far we’ve strayed from the plot. I am confused of a few things early on: 1. Why the copied story lines of both the ship-wreck in Ev and Polychrome falling off the rainbow. 2. Why doesn’t the shaggy man and Polychrome remember each other? 3. How is there all of a sudden a gun and bullet tree? 4. The picking of the ripe princess that again is being left because she isn’t wanted as a ruler. 5. Why is the love magnet changed from being fond of the owner to a weird and a l Oh my... How far we’ve strayed from the plot. I am confused of a few things early on: 1. Why the copied story lines of both the ship-wreck in Ev and Polychrome falling off the rainbow. 2. Why doesn’t the shaggy man and Polychrome remember each other? 3. How is there all of a sudden a gun and bullet tree? 4. The picking of the ripe princess that again is being left because she isn’t wanted as a ruler. 5. Why is the love magnet changed from being fond of the owner to a weird and a little disturbing over infatuation with the owner? 6. How didn’t the Nome king not remember his name when Ozma told him it after he forgot? 7. Who in the world is Betsy and why can’t Hank talk? I am only 23% and I’m trying desperately to finish this book. And now that I have forced myself to finish that horrible book, I am compelled to point out some other confusions that I will call my What did I read moments: 1. Ok so, either Ozma has lost the magic belt or she can’t be bothered to use it anymore because the wizard now does the magic transporting. 2. Cell phones??? 3. Why is it ok for this Betsy girl supposed to go on wandering around with two grown men? 4. What is up with the radium references everywhere? 5. I am not entirely sure what to make of the Ozma/Dorothy kissing scene at the end in which Dorothy blushes. I feel as though this was such a blah addition to the Oz books that, if I wasn’t someone who needed to read a series in order for fear that I might miss something worthwhile, I would have not wasted my time. P. S. The over-anticipated moment of Toto talking did not make up for all the WDIR moments that literally had me rolling my eyes.

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