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Ibsen, considered to be the father of modern drama, was a Norwegian playwright. He is responsible for "realistic drama." During the Victorian era Ibsen's ritings were considered scandalous. John Gabriel Borkman is based on an incident in Ibsen's life. An army officer attempted suicide after being charged with embezzlement. The Borkman family fortunes have been brought low Ibsen, considered to be the father of modern drama, was a Norwegian playwright. He is responsible for "realistic drama." During the Victorian era Ibsen's ritings were considered scandalous. John Gabriel Borkman is based on an incident in Ibsen's life. An army officer attempted suicide after being charged with embezzlement. The Borkman family fortunes have been brought low by the imprisonment of John Gabriel who used his position as a bank manager to illegally speculate with his investors' money. The setting for the play is a family in conflict over the future of the young Erhart Borkman.


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Ibsen, considered to be the father of modern drama, was a Norwegian playwright. He is responsible for "realistic drama." During the Victorian era Ibsen's ritings were considered scandalous. John Gabriel Borkman is based on an incident in Ibsen's life. An army officer attempted suicide after being charged with embezzlement. The Borkman family fortunes have been brought low Ibsen, considered to be the father of modern drama, was a Norwegian playwright. He is responsible for "realistic drama." During the Victorian era Ibsen's ritings were considered scandalous. John Gabriel Borkman is based on an incident in Ibsen's life. An army officer attempted suicide after being charged with embezzlement. The Borkman family fortunes have been brought low by the imprisonment of John Gabriel who used his position as a bank manager to illegally speculate with his investors' money. The setting for the play is a family in conflict over the future of the young Erhart Borkman.

30 review for An Enemy of the People (eBook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    En Folkefiende = An Enemy of the People, Henrik Ibsen An Enemy of the People is an 1882 play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. Ibsen wrote it in response to the public outcry against his previous play, Ghosts, which challenged the hypocrisy of 19th-century morality. An Enemy of the People tells the story of a man who dares to speak an unpalatable truth, and is punished for it. However, Ibsen took a somewhat skeptical view of his protagonist, suggesting that he may have gone too far in his ze En Folkefiende = An Enemy of the People, Henrik Ibsen An Enemy of the People is an 1882 play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. Ibsen wrote it in response to the public outcry against his previous play, Ghosts, which challenged the hypocrisy of 19th-century morality. An Enemy of the People tells the story of a man who dares to speak an unpalatable truth, and is punished for it. However, Ibsen took a somewhat skeptical view of his protagonist, suggesting that he may have gone too far in his zeal to tell the truth. عنوانها: دشمن مردم؛ دشمن ملت؛ اث‍ر: ه‍ن‍ری‍ک‌ ای‍ب‍س‍ن‌؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نخست ماه دسامبر سال 1977 میلادی الف): نمایشنامه «دشمن مردم»؛ اث‍ر: ه‍ن‍ری‍ک‌ ای‍ب‍س‍ن‌؛ مترجم: امیرحسین آریانپور، در 243 صفحه، چاپ اول نشر انديشه سال 1338 هجری شمسی ب): همین اثر با عنوان «دشمن ملت» ترجمه: «علیرضا ثنائی»، شرکت انتشارتی «علمی و فرهنگی»، رقعی و در دوهزار جلد و برای بار دوم پ): دشمن مردم، ترجمه از متن نروژی: «میرمجید عمرانی»، انتشارات دنیای نو ت): دشمن مردم، اثر ‏هنريک ايبسن؛ ترجمه اصغر رستگار، سال 1378 در اصفهان ث): دشمن مردم، اثر هنریک ایبسن، با ترجمه: سیامک علایی در 278 صفحه، در گودریدز ج): اقتباس «آرتور میلر» از همین اثر را نیز، آقای «غلامحسین دولت آبادی» و بانو «فاطمه خسروی» ترجمه کرده اند عنوان: دش‍م‍ن‌ م‍ل‍ت‌، اث‍ر: ه‍ن‍ری‍ک‌ ای‍ب‍س‍ن‌؛ مت‍رج‍م: م‍ح‍م‍دع‍ل‍ی‌ ج‍م‍ال‍زاده‌؛ ت‍ه‍ران‌، بنگاه ترجمه و نشر کتاب؛ ؟؟؟؟، در 193 ص؛ فروست: نمایشنامه نروژی، مجموعه ادبیات خارجی: 40، و چاپهای دیگر: ت‍ه‍ران‌: ش‍رک‍ت‌ ان‍ت‍ش‍ارات‌ ع‍ل‍م‍ی‌ و ف‍ره‍ن‍گ‍ی‌، 1382، در ش‍ان‍زده‌ ص‌ و 127 ص، شابک: 9644454227؛ تهران: وانیا‏‫، 1389، در ‏‫163 ص‬‭‬؛ شابک: 9786009183616، فروست: شاهکارهای نمایشی جهان‏‫؛ و تهران: ثالث‏‫، ‏‫1392، در ‏‫176 ص.‬؛ ‏شابک: 9789643808716؛ نمایشنامه ی «دشمن مردم»؛ از شاهکارهای «هنریک ایبسن»، نویسنده ی نروژی ست، این اثر از ایشان گویا بیش از دیگر آثارش مورد توجه منتقدین و بحث و گفتگو بوده‌. اخلاق و عقاید قهرمان نمایشنامه: «دکتر توماس استوکمان»، افکار خود «ایبسن» را به یاد خوانشگر می‌آورد. او پزشک آسایشگاهی ست، که برادرش «پتر استوکمان»، شهردار محل برپا کرده‌ است؛ و از این جهت زندگی آسوده‌ ای دارد. اما ناگهان پی می‌برد، که آب آسایشگاه و شهر، آلوده‌ است، و همین امر سلامت مردم شهر، و مسافران را تهدید می‌کند. او می‌خواهد مردم را، به وسیله ی روزنامه، از این حقیقت آگاه سازد، ولی گردانندگان امور شهر، او را با نیرنگ، از اینکار باز می‌دارند. «دکتر استوکمان» می‌کوشد، در انجمنی به مردم شهر، از خطر آب‌های آلوده ی شهر، هشدار دهد، از آنجا نیز محکوم و شکست خورده بیرون می‌آید، و مردمان به اتفاق آراء، به او لقب «دشمن مردم» می‌دهند، و چنان عرصه را بر او تنگ می‌کنند؛ که راهی جز جلای وطن ندارد. «دشمن مردم» تصمیم می‌گیرد مردم را رها کند، و از شهر و دیار خویش برود. اما پس از واقعه‌ ای، باز بر آن می‌شود که در زادگاه خویش بماند، و با بدی پیکار کند. به عقیده ی او «قوی‌ترین مرد جهان کسی ست که تنهاتر از همه باشد». ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    Norwegian Henrik Ibsen’s The Enemy of the People, first produced in 1882, is what we might now call a “whistleblower” tale. Dr. Stockman, brother of the town’s “Burgomaster,” Peter, investigates the source of the resort town’s fortunes, The Baths, and discovers it is being polluted, and for the health of locals and visitors, recommends that it be shut down. Dr. Stockman becomes “the enemy of the people” in this play because he stands against the town’s position that The Baths must continue regar Norwegian Henrik Ibsen’s The Enemy of the People, first produced in 1882, is what we might now call a “whistleblower” tale. Dr. Stockman, brother of the town’s “Burgomaster,” Peter, investigates the source of the resort town’s fortunes, The Baths, and discovers it is being polluted, and for the health of locals and visitors, recommends that it be shut down. Dr. Stockman becomes “the enemy of the people” in this play because he stands against the town’s position that The Baths must continue regardless of its threat to public health; they need the money too much. I know what you're thinking: It can't happen here! (or, same ol', same ol'.) Peter, the Burgomaster: It is you, in your blind obstinancy, want to cut off the town’s chief source of prosperity! Dr. Stockmann [his brother]: That source is poisoned, man! Are you mad? We live by trafficking in filth and corruption! Maybe you have heard of the 2017 film The Post? Chelsea Manning? Edward Snowden? The raiding of the Arctic for oil? Flint? 45 and his Billionaire Boys Club making it illegal to use terms such as “climate change” or “global warming” because these words are tools of the anti-business socialists trying to keep America From being Great again, and the liberal media grinding out fake news? Well, then this (prophetic) play may be just the play for you. Is it too dark a vision to swallow? You decide, but Ibsen sees what "progress" is made through greed: “All our sources of spiritual life are poisoned, and our whole society lies upon a pestilential basis of falsehood.”—Dr. Stockmann However you see it, in this play, the Burgomaster knows how to save The Baths and how to preserve (well, for the present, anyway) the economic health of the town: By firing the doctor and taking control of the media and the language used to talk about water. I am also in the middle of a terrific book of journalism, Dan Egan’s award-winning The Death and Life of the Great Lakes, which in part documents the pitting, on the one hand, the mindless greed and ignorance that continues to put at risk the source of the remaining 20% of the planet’s surface freshwater against, on the other hand, the ingenuity and resourcefulness of scientists (wait; is it legal for me to use that word now?) to save it. These two books seem to speak to each other, sadly. Trump, as you know, decided to roll back the Clean Water Act, which to my mind is essential to the survival of the Great Lakes, and necessary to the survival of the planet: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/0... Some modernist frameworks assume that Mankind only gets better each year, knows better, and progresses ever onward to some Higher State. If this is true, how did old Ibsen in 1882 know what we would still be facing today? Chilling, prescient, elegant, The Enemy of the People has been produced as a (dark) comedy, but I think, as with Bertolt Brecht’s dark comedy, The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui, about the rise of facism in Chicago, I expect the Goodman Theater production of An Enemy of the People can no longer be produced as a comedy. http://www.chicagotribune.com/enterta...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Honesty and integrity are all fine and good until somebody’s wallet gets hurt. So says Henrik Ibsen in his masterful 1880s drama An Enemy of the People. First published in 1882, the drama describes a small town in Norway that has become successful as a hot springs spa resort catering to the needs of the unhealthy. Dr. Stockmann, once a proud and enthusiastic proponent of the spas, had a bad feeling about the purity of the water and did some testing. The results of the tests showed severe contami Honesty and integrity are all fine and good until somebody’s wallet gets hurt. So says Henrik Ibsen in his masterful 1880s drama An Enemy of the People. First published in 1882, the drama describes a small town in Norway that has become successful as a hot springs spa resort catering to the needs of the unhealthy. Dr. Stockmann, once a proud and enthusiastic proponent of the spas, had a bad feeling about the purity of the water and did some testing. The results of the tests showed severe contamination and he made his findings public. Thinking that the town folk would be pleased, the good doctor was instead shocked to learn that almost everyone, from the small business owners, to the zealous local press, to his brother the mayor are actually fuming in rage at the thought that he may jeopardize the public livelihood. At once about the conflicts of health versus commerce, the play also explores the complex adversarial positions between the individual and the state, about conservatism versus liberality and the fragile nature of the freedom of speech. Ultimately, Ibsen has created in the small Norwegian hamlet a microcosm of the potential hostility between man and society and what is truly meant by the common good. Timeless, the lessons and morals propounded are as relevant now as they were in Ibsen’s day, a play that should be read, seen and discussed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    If it came out today, everyone would immediately read it as referring to climate change and climate change sceptics. Doctor Stockmann has taken up a position where he's responsible for monitoring the baths in the little spa town he's just moved to. He analyses water samples and is shocked to find that they're a major health hazard: naively, he believes people are going to thank him for making this important discovery. But he hasn't thought through the economic consequences. Fixing the problem wo If it came out today, everyone would immediately read it as referring to climate change and climate change sceptics. Doctor Stockmann has taken up a position where he's responsible for monitoring the baths in the little spa town he's just moved to. He analyses water samples and is shocked to find that they're a major health hazard: naively, he believes people are going to thank him for making this important discovery. But he hasn't thought through the economic consequences. Fixing the problem would cost a lot of money, which people don't want to spend: it's much easier to rubbish his work and brand him a dangerous lunatic. Scary and tragic when it appeared, ten times scarier and more tragic now.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Thinking of the times we live in caused a spontaneous re-read of this masterpiece. I understand it is not as popular outside my native Norway as Ibsen's other works, but I sincerely urge every soul do give it a try. It is quite short, and it speaks volumes about some of the greatest problems facing our present-day society, despite being written in the 19th century. Mostly a play about truth, An Enemy of the People takes place in a small Norwegian hamlet where the residing doctor realises th Thinking of the times we live in caused a spontaneous re-read of this masterpiece. I understand it is not as popular outside my native Norway as Ibsen's other works, but I sincerely urge every soul do give it a try. It is quite short, and it speaks volumes about some of the greatest problems facing our present-day society, despite being written in the 19th century. Mostly a play about truth, An Enemy of the People takes place in a small Norwegian hamlet where the residing doctor realises that the popular local baths are actually polluted. When attempting to expose this, he meets with strong resistance from all those who do not wish to see the town's main source of income shut down, and discovers that his community is built on a foundation of lies. Through his dealing with this situation, Ibsen takes the story of the doctor and his town and makes it a symbolic critique of society itself. I have never particularly enjoyed theatre, but the occasional play does stand out. This particular one is my favourite of all time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nikos Tsentemeidis

    “The strongest man in the world is he who stands most alone.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Haaze

    Ibsen’s play "An Enemy of the People" [En folkefiende] from 1882 focuses on a small town where a local doctor discovers that the renowned spa has polluted water. It becomes a complicated fact as different people in the town take a stand. In a sense the play is about a whistle-blower. However, after initially very much enjoying the play (after all, nothing much has changed in the last 140 years so there are numerous parallels in modern times including the present) the whole drama turns into a farce. The Ibsen’s play "An Enemy of the People" [En folkefiende] from 1882 focuses on a small town where a local doctor discovers that the renowned spa has polluted water. It becomes a complicated fact as different people in the town take a stand. In a sense the play is about a whistle-blower. However, after initially very much enjoying the play (after all, nothing much has changed in the last 140 years so there are numerous parallels in modern times including the present) the whole drama turns into a farce. The realm of comedy and sarcasm grow unexpectedly into major forces and I cannot quite decide if Ibsen is being sarcastic or funny in the last two acts. I felt that the drama had so much potential in terms of the juxtaposition of environmental health and human ignorance and greed. I think Ibsen should have maintained a serious stance rather than letting the scenes decline into the realm of comedy. I wonder what he was thinking? It seems like Ibsen had some issues as well. He wrote to his publisher in Copenhagen: "I am still uncertain as to whether I should call it a comedy or a straight drama. It may [have] many traits of comedy, but it also is based on a serious idea." Still, the play gives one plenty to think about in terms of how and why people take sides in the realm of environmental issues. There are so many corporations and governments that take the wrong stance simply to protect the profit margins and political majority. As a consequence, we now have serious problems across the world. Besides, today this play could easily have focused on climate change as the central issue and how society responds to it. I do think that the play's premise has extreme relevance in the modern world. https://www.theguardian.com/environme...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mwanamali

    No rating. I read this book in high school. It was a set book. And I hated it. Not because the writing is bad or because I felt it was some kind of political analogy but because it was text book to me. Reading it was a chore I would have preferred not to do. At all. Like ironing clothes or emptying my cat's litter box. Bleurgh!!! I don't even recall most of it. All I remember was lots of sewage. Lots of opposition. And the groaning drone of my high school English teacher (who didn't like me, btw) as he blathered on No rating. I read this book in high school. It was a set book. And I hated it. Not because the writing is bad or because I felt it was some kind of political analogy but because it was text book to me. Reading it was a chore I would have preferred not to do. At all. Like ironing clothes or emptying my cat's litter box. Bleurgh!!! I don't even recall most of it. All I remember was lots of sewage. Lots of opposition. And the groaning drone of my high school English teacher (who didn't like me, btw) as he blathered on about how the title is an antonym because of some kind of political persuasion because of... I can already hear my cells falling asleep. So I'll stop there. And take a walk. This book is recommended to anyone who didn't have to go through my English classes in high school.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    As usual, Ibsen cuts to the chase. It is both enlightening and disheartening to discover that the issues of political leadership and environmental stewardship which inspired his writing 135 years ago still dog us in the 21st century. Based on his other works, I was surprised at the manner in which this story unfolded. The story did not grip me in the manner of A Doll's House and Ghosts but his characters are wonderful, nonetheless.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sookie

    Dr. Thomas Stockmann is a template for those who stand up against the system - alone, ruthless and with absolute morality. A society and the people who sit in its helm (corporate heads, government, politicians etc) get into a relationship that looks for immediate contentment and superficial sense of accomplishment. We see this mentality when religion, power hungry, propaganda or downright stupidity get involved and pushes science, morals, goodwill, innovation, development, logic away from the pu Dr. Thomas Stockmann is a template for those who stand up against the system - alone, ruthless and with absolute morality. A society and the people who sit in its helm (corporate heads, government, politicians etc) get into a relationship that looks for immediate contentment and superficial sense of accomplishment. We see this mentality when religion, power hungry, propaganda or downright stupidity get involved and pushes science, morals, goodwill, innovation, development, logic away from the public discourse. Be it climate deniers or creation supporters, be it racial prejudice or gender politics, Ibsen's "The Enemy of the state" is a mirror to all. . Dr. Thomas Stockmann is a man of science who calls upon problematic conditions of their town. He gets disowned for it as his argument doesn't go past the greater good of the townsfolk in the long run and not the economic repercussions his suggested changes would bring. He chooses to stay and fight the people who have shunned him because that's the right thing to do. The authority is stripped from him - his practice, his home, his dignity, his respect. His daughter subscribes to her father's moral conduct and ends up losing her job after her father publicly calls out on, well, bullshit. A wonderful insight into the mind of an activist whose only intention is -general good. And as always, humanity fails spectacularly fails.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    In response to the poor reception of his play "Ghosts," Ibsen wrote "An Enemy of the People." Dr. Stockmann discovers that the Municipal Baths in his hometown are contaminated, and believes he is doing good for the community. He is declared an enemy of the people when he addresses the ignorant and powerful majority. At this point, Dr. Stockmann discovers a far more serious problem.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Here's my review from two years ago which makes me cringe: "Read this in high school. Think it was the Arthur Miller "translation." [Our teacher told us Miller did not read Norwegian, but got someone who did to do a literal translation which he then edited] In any case I don't remember the dramaturgy or the language, only the theme: the conflict between public health and making money in business. The latter should not be mistaken for "economic development." The latter term, as used by certain ec Here's my review from two years ago which makes me cringe: "Read this in high school. Think it was the Arthur Miller "translation." [Our teacher told us Miller did not read Norwegian, but got someone who did to do a literal translation which he then edited] In any case I don't remember the dramaturgy or the language, only the theme: the conflict between public health and making money in business. The latter should not be mistaken for "economic development." The latter term, as used by certain economists whom I respect, means that the quality of life is improved for all in a society. In that sense, "economic development" is not an enemy to public health, but making profits where and when you can often is. An early work about a whistle-blower, a cautionary tale." Re-read the book in Miller's adaptation last week and was overpowered. I'd forgotten the extra twist of tragedy, that Dr Stockmann's heroism has come close by the end of the short play to destroying not just his career but his family. What a terrible bind! Another turn of the screw I'd forgotten is that the protagonist is manipulated by others who turn his quest to their own ends. He wants to broadcast the truth to prevent disease; others want that broadcasting to bring down public officials. His father in law's meanness creates the appearance that Dr Stockmann is acting to drive down the value of stock in the anticipated spa-resort so that his relative can buy it for half-price. At least in To Kill a Mockingbird lawyer Finch's courage and civic virtue do not cause him to be run out of town, though his actions do directly endanger his children without his knowing it. Thank goodness they are saved. How many times in life must family and children be hostages to doing the right thing? Is Dr Stockmann an idiot or a hero? Or must some heroes be idiots? I would have to know much more about Ibsen and about Miller and have to reread Dostoyevsky to say where Ibsen or Miller place him. I'll say idiot-hero, admiringly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    From BBC radio 4 - Drama: Alfred Molina, Adam Godley, Susannah Fielding, Ian Ogilvy and James Callis are directed by Martin Jarvis in Henrik Ibsen's riveting 1882 thriller. A small Norwegian spa town relies on the local spring for its prosperity, but Dr Thomas Stockmann is concerned the waters may be contaminated. Could disease be spreading? If so, would the community's livelihood be jeopardised? Episode 2 of 2 Alfred Molina, Adam Godley, Susannah Fielding a From BBC radio 4 - Drama: Alfred Molina, Adam Godley, Susannah Fielding, Ian Ogilvy and James Callis are directed by Martin Jarvis in Henrik Ibsen's riveting 1882 thriller. A small Norwegian spa town relies on the local spring for its prosperity, but Dr Thomas Stockmann is concerned the waters may be contaminated. Could disease be spreading? If so, would the community's livelihood be jeopardised? Episode 2 of 2 Alfred Molina, Adam Godley, Susannah Fielding and Ian Ogilvy lead an all start cast. Dr Stockmann has discovered the town's spa-baths are contaminated. How will this affect local business interests? Will Stockmann be publicly vilified? Martin Jarvis directs this new version by Rebecca Lenkiewicz of Henrik Ibsen's dynamic thriller. Will campaigning courage turn into self-righteous fanaticism? Vested interest lives on and this timeless 1882 drama is as up to date now as when it was first performed. Townpeople: Moira Quirk, Elizabeth Knowleden, Jean Gilpin, Alan Shearman, Neil Dickson, Ifan Meredith This new version of the play by Rebecca Lenkiewicz. Specially composed music: A-Mnemonic Director: Martin Jarvis A Jarvis and Ayres production for BBC Radio 4. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09x...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kusaimamekirai

    With the phrase “enemy of the people” being quite in vogue at the moment with the current occupant of the White House, this seemed like a good play to explore. In short, it’s the story of Thomas Stockmann, a doctor in a small Norwegian town, who has discovered that the town’s main source of income, its newly installed baths, are full of poisons that have been sickening people for months. Being the earnest type he quickly informs his brother Peter, who is also the town’s mayor, in addition to in With the phrase “enemy of the people” being quite in vogue at the moment with the current occupant of the White House, this seemed like a good play to explore. In short, it’s the story of Thomas Stockmann, a doctor in a small Norwegian town, who has discovered that the town’s main source of income, its newly installed baths, are full of poisons that have been sickening people for months. Being the earnest type he quickly informs his brother Peter, who is also the town’s mayor, in addition to informing the town newspaper and the head of the community trade organization. Fully expecting swift action to correct this danger to the community, Thomas instead encounters an entrenched bureaucracy that is scandal adverse and unwilling to take the financial hit that repairing the baths would involve. Thomas is instead asked to publicly lie about his findings or face swift retribution as well him and his family being ostracized from the community. When he refuses, the community falls lock step in line behind his brother in a kind of frenzy, and Thomas’s life becomes a kind of prolonged hell. Ibsen seems here to present a cautionary tale about the dangers of groupthink and how quickly a mob can fall in behind a leader irrespective of facts. Thomas has incontrovertible proof that the town is being irreparably harmed but it doesn’t matter to the majority of the town who see only a loss of income, personal hardships, and fear of being rebuked by their neighbors. They react quickly and excommunicate anyone who threatens the decisions of the group at large. It is also however a story of mania, the officials and the crowds they lie to and inflame, but also that of Thomas. Yes he has truth on his side, but he is also so strident and so consumed with his own righteousness that any possible route toward conciliation is off the table from the beginning. He is so consumed by his sense of justice that he occasionally daydreams about how he will refuse parades and awards that will surely be given to him once he informs the town of what he has discovered. He of course gets none of that but even to the very end, he believes that truth and justice will win out, despite his life and his family’s life being utterly and completely ruined, and his having been betrayed by everyone around him. If Ibsen were alive in 2018 he would no doubt recognize many of these characters on today’s stage. The leader who tells his “people” what to think (I won’t mention anyone by name but a certain man in a certain campaign who once famously said at a campaign rally to his supporters “you don’t have to worry about thinking anymore. I’ll take care of everything”). The people who fall lock step behind him no matter the harm it may cause them. The true believers who are so fervent in their moral certainty that they can allow nothing short of bending offenders of justice to their point of view. It’s a chilling play that in many ways was far ahead of its time.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Biblio Curious

    How can this one be so different from Ghosts? I enjoyed Ghosts immensely because of it's poetic insight towards different points of view. Pillars is far more political, about resources and maybe double-dealings is the word? This would make a fantastic live theatre production, it's themes would seep into the audience causing lively debates about the how's and why's. In some ways, this play is relevant today and conversation about it can turn into a discussion about politics and even forms of medi How can this one be so different from Ghosts? I enjoyed Ghosts immensely because of it's poetic insight towards different points of view. Pillars is far more political, about resources and maybe double-dealings is the word? This would make a fantastic live theatre production, it's themes would seep into the audience causing lively debates about the how's and why's. In some ways, this play is relevant today and conversation about it can turn into a discussion about politics and even forms of media for disseminating information. A play like this is difficult for me to rate. 5 stars because there's really nothing wrong with it. 3 stars because of my mood in terms of when I read it (being right after Ghosts). In this play's introduction it said Ibsen wrote this in reply to his outrage at Ghosts being considered scandalous. He was in a tizzy because Ghosts wasn't well received by his public. Perhaps his courage to write this play in reply to Ghost's public reaction would garner it 5 stars? This play could spark politically charged discussions about current events so maybe keep it at 3 stars because politically, we're charged enough and need to become charged to create a healthier way.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09x... Description: A small Norwegian spa town relies on the local spring for its prosperity, but Dr Thomas Stockmann is concerned the waters may be contaminated. Could disease be spreading? If so, would the community's livelihood be jeopardised? This new version of the play by Rebecca Lenkiewicz. Dr Thomas Stockmann Alfred Molina Peter Stockman Adam Godley Catherine Rosalind Ayres Petra Susannah Fielding Hovstad James Callis Aslaksen Matthew Wolf Billing Darren Richardson Horster Simon Templeman https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09x... Description: A small Norwegian spa town relies on the local spring for its prosperity, but Dr Thomas Stockmann is concerned the waters may be contaminated. Could disease be spreading? If so, would the community's livelihood be jeopardised? This new version of the play by Rebecca Lenkiewicz. Dr Thomas Stockmann Alfred Molina Peter Stockman Adam Godley Catherine Rosalind Ayres Petra Susannah Fielding Hovstad James Callis Aslaksen Matthew Wolf Billing Darren Richardson Horster Simon Templeman Morten Kiil Ian Ogilvy Boy Joe Katzenellenbogen Boy Freddie Katzenellenbogen 3* A Doll's House 4* Hedda Gabler 4* Ghosts 4* An Enemy of the People 4* Peer Gynt 3* The Wild Duck 3* The Lady from the Sea 2* Brand 3* Rosmersholm 4* John Gabriel Borkman

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    How it could be interesting if you work with your classmates as group to prepare a nice memory and make a worthy work for university...!😊

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matt Luedke

    I read a translation by Arthur Miller, and though it goes by pretty quickly it sticks with you for a long time. It has a touch of humor, but is a mostly serious look at how the truth, especially when it comes to environmental issues, can sometimes be in no one's political favor. "Inconvenient," if you will. This was written in 1882, 70 years before choloroflourocarbons started messing with the ozone layer, 100 years before climate change was starting to be taken seriously-- then dropp I read a translation by Arthur Miller, and though it goes by pretty quickly it sticks with you for a long time. It has a touch of humor, but is a mostly serious look at how the truth, especially when it comes to environmental issues, can sometimes be in no one's political favor. "Inconvenient," if you will. This was written in 1882, 70 years before choloroflourocarbons started messing with the ozone layer, 100 years before climate change was starting to be taken seriously-- then dropped because of political fears. Amazing how this piece of fiction is so short and simple yet still so applicable. A doctor discovers that his town's biggest employer is actually an environmental health hazard. The owners, of course, deny this-- as tobacco companies would deny their products are harmful until the end of time. The people of the town want to be healthy, but when they hear their employer would hold the town hostage and cut jobs if environmental restrictions were passed, they too decry the doctor. Soon, he has precious few supporters left and is branded the "enemy of the people" referred to in the title. Reading this in the midst of the ongoing debate on climate change policy, which has been embarrassingly silent in the past 4 years due to politics, is fascinating. As Neil DeGrasse Tyson once said: "The good thing about science is that it's true, whether or not you believe in it."

  19. 5 out of 5

    ☯Emily

    Dr. Stockmann is a naive doctor and scientist. He has discovered why visitors are getting sick when they come to the town's baths. The water is contaminated. He determines to tell the town. However, his brother, the mayor, does not want this broadcasted and is determined to stop the doctor's announcement of this problem. The mayor appeals to the economic welfare of the people which, as you can guess, is successful. The people of the town do not want to hear about the problem if it requires payin Dr. Stockmann is a naive doctor and scientist. He has discovered why visitors are getting sick when they come to the town's baths. The water is contaminated. He determines to tell the town. However, his brother, the mayor, does not want this broadcasted and is determined to stop the doctor's announcement of this problem. The mayor appeals to the economic welfare of the people which, as you can guess, is successful. The people of the town do not want to hear about the problem if it requires paying for the repairs. Nor do the stockholders. With typical political finesse, the mayor has the doctor declared an "enemy of the people." As you read this play, you will realize that politics has not changed in the last 130 years. The doctor observes that "from one end of this country to the other, every man is the slave of his Party." Another time he states that "it is the party leaders that must be exterminated. A party leader is like a wolf, you see-like a voracious wolf. He requires a certain number of smaller victims to prey upon each year, if he is to live." It sounds very much like he was talking about the Republican Health Care Plan! I am eager to see this play performed next week.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Anyone sick of party politics would probably like this book, as there are some fantastic quotes inside against them. Personally I don't think it was one of the best of Ibsen's work, although looking at it form the viewpoint of the play being a rebuttal to the outrage over his play "Ghosts" makes it pretty funny. It is definitely one of his simpler plays, with one main story and nothing really winding off of it. I'm not so fond of the characters, like Petra and Mrs. Stockman Anyone sick of party politics would probably like this book, as there are some fantastic quotes inside against them. Personally I don't think it was one of the best of Ibsen's work, although looking at it form the viewpoint of the play being a rebuttal to the outrage over his play "Ghosts" makes it pretty funny. It is definitely one of his simpler plays, with one main story and nothing really winding off of it. I'm not so fond of the characters, like Petra and Mrs. Stockmann, who seemed to bend too easily to fall behind Dr. Stockmann. Petra did remain static in her rebelliousness, but it just seemed too extreme to be plausible to me, especially once she realizes that her admirer had only taken up the cause for her sake. Mrs. Stockmann was so against her husband's cause but just decided that she would fully support him when others left his cause. I just don't believe that she would change that easily, she still did have doubt, but nothing near what she had before. Despite those few nit-picks, I still loved the play. It was interesting in the end and I simply didn't want to put it down. I liked the fact that they questioned what the majority wanted and what was the "right" thing to do. It was very thought provoking.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I'm at once reminded of my college studies in epidemiology, where John Snow discovered the source of cholera being contaminated waters. I wanted to scream at the people to listen to the doctor. He knows what he's talking about. And how true it is that just because the masses agree on something, doesn't make it right.............there are definitely more idiots in this world than intelligent people. Or maybe there are a few more intelligent people, but they choose to act like idiots for reasons o I'm at once reminded of my college studies in epidemiology, where John Snow discovered the source of cholera being contaminated waters. I wanted to scream at the people to listen to the doctor. He knows what he's talking about. And how true it is that just because the masses agree on something, doesn't make it right.............there are definitely more idiots in this world than intelligent people. Or maybe there are a few more intelligent people, but they choose to act like idiots for reasons of their own devise - greed, popularity, guilt......The right decisions and popular choices are not always one and the same and it absolutely takes a strong man or woman to stand by the right choice, because there are times when they will be standing alone. I started out giving this 3 stars, wanting to give it 3.5, but now after railing against the idiots I'm giving it a 4! Take that......you know who I'm talking about!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    An Enemy of the People is an interesting play, mainly because it applies so much to attitudes about some subjects nowadays in modern times (environment issues- are we destroying the ozone layer?). It is very telling of the hypocrisy of the government and of politics. In thid play, the main character discovers that the famous hot springs in his own town are polluted and could cause many people to become sick. However, the somewhat corrupt political system denies this from an economic standpoint while s An Enemy of the People is an interesting play, mainly because it applies so much to attitudes about some subjects nowadays in modern times (environment issues- are we destroying the ozone layer?). It is very telling of the hypocrisy of the government and of politics. In thid play, the main character discovers that the famous hot springs in his own town are polluted and could cause many people to become sick. However, the somewhat corrupt political system denies this from an economic standpoint while swaying the citizens of the town to turn against the main character. Many of Ibsen's plays do not seem dated or archaic at all- this play is a prime example of that. As I stated before, there are a lot of conflicts that have been covered up to avoid economic issues. I enjoy reading a protest in play form, because Ibsen can do it well. Overall, this play is insightful, applicable, and entertaining as a drama.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dora Okeyo

    This book is a course text for high school students in Kenya now- and I often heard my Mom make references to it and the main character Dr. Stockmann, plenty of times. When I started reading it- the pace and also the concern of the characters got me thinking and asking the same questions that he does- 'if something is wrong, should I keep murm about it, all because a bunch of people benefit from it-in the name of society or community well being?' This is the first book I have read writ This book is a course text for high school students in Kenya now- and I often heard my Mom make references to it and the main character Dr. Stockmann, plenty of times. When I started reading it- the pace and also the concern of the characters got me thinking and asking the same questions that he does- 'if something is wrong, should I keep murm about it, all because a bunch of people benefit from it-in the name of society or community well being?' This is the first book I have read written by Henrik- and I loved reading the story-it's in form of a dialogue- some consider it a play, but in real sense it is a depiction of the corruption that is sadly very evident in Kenya and most third world countries right now. I wish I had read it earlier- I reckon I would have loved it more had I been in high school at the time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Perkins

    My favorite Ibsen, along with Peer Gynt.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Read for class, so no review. But, this book has constantly been on my mind so I changed the rating to 5 stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    WillSilverSpringMDUSA

    After the first two acts, I was happily awaiting the conclusion of a simple environmentally-conscious fable about Truth vs Power. However, Ibsen had something messier in mind. The conflicts presented in this play offer a lot to ponder over, especially regarding how to approach issues like climate change where public opinion can easily be led awry.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The truth that this book pointed out to me and by the way this truth has yet to be proven wrong to me is that "the people" are fucking idiots. Individual persons can be so brilliant you can't believe it. The larger the mass of "people" the fucking dumber they get. "The people" will believe anything they are told regardless of how absurd. It's sad but very true. Take the state of New Jersey. We are continualy fucked by our elected officials. We cry and complain that we're being fucked every day. The truth that this book pointed out to me and by the way this truth has yet to be proven wrong to me is that "the people" are fucking idiots. Individual persons can be so brilliant you can't believe it. The larger the mass of "people" the fucking dumber they get. "The people" will believe anything they are told regardless of how absurd. It's sad but very true. Take the state of New Jersey. We are continualy fucked by our elected officials. We cry and complain that we're being fucked every day. YET! When election time rolls around only about one third of "the people" show up at the polls and then even that smaller slice(which should be smarter) proceeds to vote in again the same fuckers they've been crying about for the last four years. They just vote them in again. That my friends is "the people" this book nails it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katie Dunn

    *4.5 I thoroughly enjoyed this tragedy -- is it a tragedy? It reminded me of Brecht's Galileo, but ... seemed less tragic? The refusal to recant, holding on to the end, bringing his family down with him...but the catharsis so strong that I never think the doctor fell... Perhaps it is actually that he just lacked any sort of realization. But then he successfully brought me into the delusion, if you must call it that, with him. As a scientist at heart, I couldn't help but be moved by his *4.5 I thoroughly enjoyed this tragedy -- is it a tragedy? It reminded me of Brecht's Galileo, but ... seemed less tragic? The refusal to recant, holding on to the end, bringing his family down with him...but the catharsis so strong that I never think the doctor fell... Perhaps it is actually that he just lacked any sort of realization. But then he successfully brought me into the delusion, if you must call it that, with him. As a scientist at heart, I couldn't help but be moved by his idealism. The way this resounded with me also let me see how Death of a Salesman could be viewed the same way, if one had as much faith in the American Dream as I do good science. In principle, the two are actually very similar. Definitely worth reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Richard Knight

    A play as relevant back then as it is now, An Enemy of the People is vintage Ibsen. A doctor discovers that there is something rotten in his town, and when he speaks out for the benefit of his fellow man, they turn on him. A towering work. Not Ibsen's best, but up there.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mohad

    3/5 To be honest, if I didn't have an exam on this for my class, I would never read it. But the thing is that, it wasn't a total torture, to some extent I enjoyed it and I'm really happy that I could persuade myself to finish it. I'm proud of myself ;)

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