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The Beasts of Tarzan

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The adventure story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction mag The adventure story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. Burroughs went against the advice of men in his field and made Tarzan a marketing success though comic strips, movies and commercial products. There are 26 novels in the Tarzan series. Tarzan, now called Lord Greystoke, becomes the target of greedy men. When his wife and son are kidnapped, he manages to escape his desert island. With the help of his animal friends, he sets out on the trail of the kidnappers. Sequel to The Return of Tarzan.


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The adventure story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction mag The adventure story of Tarzan and Jane has delighted fans for a century. Their romantic/adventure stories are as much fun to read now as they were when they were first written. Edgar Rice Burroughs was born in 1875 in Chicago, Illinois. Although Burroughs wrote in many genres he is best known for creating the jungle hero Tarzan. Burroughs began writing for pulp fiction magazines and in 1912 he published Tarzan of the Apes. Burroughs went against the advice of men in his field and made Tarzan a marketing success though comic strips, movies and commercial products. There are 26 novels in the Tarzan series. Tarzan, now called Lord Greystoke, becomes the target of greedy men. When his wife and son are kidnapped, he manages to escape his desert island. With the help of his animal friends, he sets out on the trail of the kidnappers. Sequel to The Return of Tarzan.

30 review for The Beasts of Tarzan

  1. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    Another action packed Tarzan novel. This one was a bit of a contradiction. On one hand this may have been my favorite of the Tarzan books so far, but on the other hand it was a little more far-fetched then even the previous novels. (If it gets more far-fetched than a human raised by apes, that is.) I liked this one because Tarzan led a tribe of Apes as well as a panther in battle against evil. But as you can imagine, it requires some suspension of disbelief, especially when they all g Another action packed Tarzan novel. This one was a bit of a contradiction. On one hand this may have been my favorite of the Tarzan books so far, but on the other hand it was a little more far-fetched then even the previous novels. (If it gets more far-fetched than a human raised by apes, that is.) I liked this one because Tarzan led a tribe of Apes as well as a panther in battle against evil. But as you can imagine, it requires some suspension of disbelief, especially when they all get on a sailboat to chase the bad guys. It's not nearly as silly as it reads here, however, and is actually pretty cool. Rokoff and Paulvitch, the villains of the previous novel return, but end up facing Tarzan and his beasts, as the title implies. They also make the mistake of kidnapping Tarzan's wife and son, which Tarzan is not pleased with as he hunts them to the ends of the Earth if needed. Overall another good Tarzan novel, but no real surprises here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Dalton

    I bought this huge collection of 25 Tarzan novels, I think for only $0.99 a few years ago. I am slowly going through it. Just now finishing off Tarzan #3: The Beasts of Tarzan. I read the first 7 books way back about 30+ years ago, but now with this collection I aim to continue on and read them all. Lot of good ole Tarzan type action. And yes, written to reflect the times the author lived in.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    - So, your third Tarzan in a row, huh? - Yes. - How was it? - Same old, same old. - What do you mean? - Well, Tarzan got in trouble, rushes through the jungle, kills, hunts, eats raw meat etc. Almost gets killed a couple times. Things like that. - There must be more to it than only that? - Oh, yeah. This time he hunts the bad guy together with a bunch of beasts; mostly apes but also a panther. - Sounds weird. - Not much weirder than Jungle Book, I’d say. The whole posse reminded me of the evil twins of Bremen's Town Musicians to be honest. - And what about the young and - So, your third Tarzan in a row, huh? - Yes. - How was it? - Same old, same old. - What do you mean? - Well, Tarzan got in trouble, rushes through the jungle, kills, hunts, eats raw meat etc. Almost gets killed a couple times. Things like that. - There must be more to it than only that? - Oh, yeah. This time he hunts the bad guy together with a bunch of beasts; mostly apes but also a panther. - Sounds weird. - Not much weirder than Jungle Book, I’d say. The whole posse reminded me of the evil twins of Bremen's Town Musicians to be honest. - And what about the young and pretty girls? - Only one, and that’s Mrs T. Had to fight for her own most of the time. Pretty tough when need to be, at other times fragile when the plot requires it. - I see. Any Sex? - Nope. Must have happened between book 2 and 3. They have a baby boy now. - Anything more you like to say? - No. - Why not? - BECAUSE IT’S HOTTER THAN JUNGLE HELL HERE RIGHT NOW AND I’M TIRED OF THIS Q&A BS! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brom Kim

    Yeah, more Burroughs - read it on my smartphone. This was arguably, a bit sexist, and/or racist, again, arguably, although not for the times, considering it is early 20th century fiction. The main thing is, Tarzan has A PET LEOPARD, and loyal band of giant apes in this one, who chew up his enemies through the course of many adventures. Come on. A PET LEOPARD! While I cannot deny the appeal of this type of reading for me, living in cube land by day, and make no excuses for it, I think that my rea Yeah, more Burroughs - read it on my smartphone. This was arguably, a bit sexist, and/or racist, again, arguably, although not for the times, considering it is early 20th century fiction. The main thing is, Tarzan has A PET LEOPARD, and loyal band of giant apes in this one, who chew up his enemies through the course of many adventures. Come on. A PET LEOPARD! While I cannot deny the appeal of this type of reading for me, living in cube land by day, and make no excuses for it, I think that my reads of 19th and 20th century fiction have given me insight into mindsets of the day.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Qt

    I hadn't read a Tarzan book in a while and was eager to return to his jungle world. My copy is illustrated and I loved the drawings.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Jones

    The Beasts of Tarzan is tiring. I tire of Tarzan’s magical ability to make apes evolve into human, complete with language, at the mere exposure to his presence. I tire of the horrendous African stereotypes from a snowflake-white author that makes the natives appear worse than savage. I tire of Jane’s constant hysteria. I tire of Rokoff and Paulvich’s nonsensical wickedness, without rhyme or reason, just bad intent for the sake of the novel’s need for a villain. Most of all, I tire of Tarzan’s i The Beasts of Tarzan is tiring. I tire of Tarzan’s magical ability to make apes evolve into human, complete with language, at the mere exposure to his presence. I tire of the horrendous African stereotypes from a snowflake-white author that makes the natives appear worse than savage. I tire of Jane’s constant hysteria. I tire of Rokoff and Paulvich’s nonsensical wickedness, without rhyme or reason, just bad intent for the sake of the novel’s need for a villain. Most of all, I tire of Tarzan’s inability to eliminate these witless idiot villains while simultaneously being the Superman of the early twentieth century. The Beasts of Tarzan is the third installment of the Tarzan series written by Edgar Rice Burroughs and begins a couple years after Tarzan has claimed his hereditary title of Lord Greystroke, married Jane, and produced an infant heir, Jack. The infant is kidnapped by his archrivals Nikolas Rokoff and Alexis Paulvich. While trying to retrieve their child, Tarzan and Jane are also separately kidnapped and imprisoned on a ship headed to the coast of Africa. Abandoned on a desolate island and told his son will be raised by cannibals, Tarzan’s only hope to save his family and revenge them is by befriending a vicious panther, a tribe of intelligent apes, and a group of native warriors. This novel is unnecessary. While the first novel established the character of Tarzan and the second novel reunited Tarzan and Jane in holy matrimony, the third novel is the first evidence that Burroughs is being overtaken by the monetary benefits of literature rather than the artistic responsibility. This novel is perhaps why the Tarzan series is seen as “junk” literature and rarely seriously analyzed for literary value, despite Burroughs’ clear talents as an author. I wish he didn’t write this novel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    To celebrate "Tarzan of the Apes"'s centennial this month--Edgar Rice Burroughs' first Tarzan novel was released in the October 1912 issue of "All-Story Magazine"--I have been compulsively reading the first novels in what eventually became a series of some two dozen books. Book #2, "The Return of Tarzan" (1913), was a fairly direct sequel to the initial classic outing, while book #3, "The Beasts of Tarzan," picks up the tale several years later. This novel originally appeared in serial form in t To celebrate "Tarzan of the Apes"'s centennial this month--Edgar Rice Burroughs' first Tarzan novel was released in the October 1912 issue of "All-Story Magazine"--I have been compulsively reading the first novels in what eventually became a series of some two dozen books. Book #2, "The Return of Tarzan" (1913), was a fairly direct sequel to the initial classic outing, while book #3, "The Beasts of Tarzan," picks up the tale several years later. This novel originally appeared in serial form in the pages of "All-Story Cavalier" magazine in 1914 (the popular pulp had debuted in 1905 and would end its run in 1916), with a cover price of...10 cents. It made its first book appearance two years later. The shortest of the first four Tarzan books, coming in at a mere 159 pages (I refer here to the popular series of Ballantine paperbacks of the 1960s, which introduced Tarzan to a whole new generation of readers), it is a relentlessly fast-paced and compact affair, and fairly gripping from its very first page. On that page, Tarzan--now the father, with his bride Jane Portman, of an infant son, Jack--learns that his archenemy from book #2, Nikolas Rokoff, has just busted out from a French jail. And on page 2, he discovers that Rokoff has wasted little time in wreaking his vengeance on the noble Lord Greystoke. Jack has been kidnapped, and Tarzan and Jane are soon captured and brought by ship to the deserted "Jungle Island," off the coast of west Africa. Tarzan is marooned and left to his fate, Jack is to be handed over to a tribe of cannibals, while the devilish and lustful Rokoff has other plans for the nubile Lady Greystoke. All this, in just the first 13 pages! Ere long, Tarzan explores his desert island, becomes friendly with an ape tribe headed by the intelligent anthropoid Akut, tames a vicious panther named Sheeta (Tarzan's rescue of Sheeta and subsequent bonding with the jungle cat may recall to some readers the Biblical story of Daniel and the lion), and finds his very own Friday: Mugambi, chief of the Wagambi of Ugambi (!), a black native who, ultimately, also bonds with the Ape Man. And so, with this motley crew of man and beasts, Tarzan attempts to make it to the mainland and rescue his son and wife.... "The Beasts of Tarzan," as mentioned, is absolutely relentless in its pace--indeed, the entire novel is essentially one long chase sequence--and wastes zero time whatsoever in setting things up. Bang, right out of the gate, we are off and running, and the thrills just never let up! Action highlights of this entry are Tarzan's underwater fight with a crocodile, Tarzan and his crew invading a ship full of cutthroat mutineers, Tarzan's escape from the clutches of a cannibal sacrifice, and Jane's solo flight through the jungle, the crazed Rokoff at her heels. As usual, the book's chapters are arranged in cliffhanger fashion, with Burroughs practically daring his audience to stop reading. Also, as usual, the novel is presented with overlapping and concurrent story lines alternating for our attention, a device that is a tad confusing in some instances. Still, it all ultimately manages to hang together. The character of Tarzan here is very much the savage we have come to love from book #1 (he was a man of civilization for at least half of book #2), killing his animal prey and cutting out bloody steaks to devour raw. In a fascinating early segment, Burroughs shows us how remarkably proficient the Ape Man is at staying alive in the wild and at woodcraft, as Tarzan, on his first day on his desert isle, makes himself a stone knife, a bow and arrows, a loincloth, an arboreal shelter and a fire; no one on CBS' "Survivor" has ever done better, to put it mildly! The novel is an excellent showcase for Jane, also, who has not previously seemed nearly as brave and resourceful; likewise, the villainous Rokoff is presented as more diabolical, vicious and cravenly than ever, and his comeuppance toward the novel's conclusion is a satisfying one. "The Beasts of Tarzan," in short, is a highly successful, extremely exciting entry in the Tarzan series, if not a perfect one. Par for the course, Burroughs makes a few flubs here and there (such as when he refers to Rokoff's lieutenant, Alexis Paulvitch, as "Alexander," and when he writes that Tarzan had, in book #1, given the ape Kerchak a chance to escape, rather than Terkoz), but most readers will be too caught up in the fast-moving sweep of events to care, or even notice. As I've written elsewhere, even after almost 100 years, these books can prove highly addictive. For example, in "Beasts," Paulvitch manages to escape Tarzan's clutches and flee into the jungle. Guess I'm going to HAVE to proceed on to book #4 now, "The Son of Tarzan," to see what happens next....

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Roth

    Third in the series. After "Return of," which was a foray into John Buchan style espionage fare, this one is very satisfyingly jungle-oriented, and also includes Jane taking on some courageous action-hero duties. The story is unashamedly bloodthirsty in places—not at all like the sanitized Tarzan of film. Tarzan is quite capable of sinking down into savagery—snapping the neck of a villainous henchman, even while Jane begs him to spare the guy; then he impatiently discards the corpse over his sho Third in the series. After "Return of," which was a foray into John Buchan style espionage fare, this one is very satisfyingly jungle-oriented, and also includes Jane taking on some courageous action-hero duties. The story is unashamedly bloodthirsty in places—not at all like the sanitized Tarzan of film. Tarzan is quite capable of sinking down into savagery—snapping the neck of a villainous henchman, even while Jane begs him to spare the guy; then he impatiently discards the corpse over his shoulder. For those keeping a close watch on complicated and creepy outmoded racial concepts, these books offer lots to analyze—especially, here, the way-upriver "natives" of the Congo basin, who themselves have elongated arms like gorillas. Burroughs is always interested in filling in the empty space between human and animal with half-animalistic Africans, devolved feral humans like Tarzan, and talking semi-intelligent anthropoid apes, but also, to his credit, with humans—especially Belgians and, in this book, Russians—who sink to a sub-civilized level with very little provocation. Russians and Belgians definitely rank below most sub-Saharan Africans in Burroughs's personal version of the chain of being. On to the next one!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Even though the Tarzan stories are over 60 years old they remain timeless. These books are fantastic reading. These books make all the movies and cartoons seem meaningless. Highly recommended

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    “The Beasts of Tarzan”, the third book by Edgar Rice Burroughs to feature his famous leopard-print-loinclothed hero, sees our hero, Lord Greystoke, on a chase to save his newborn infant son from the vile hands of Russian ne-’er-do-well Nikolas Rokoff and his partner-in-crime, Alexis Paulvitch, who have escaped from prison. The villains take the kidnapped boy to a jungle island, luring both Tarzan and Jane into a trap. Unfortunately, husband and wife are separated, neither one knowing “The Beasts of Tarzan”, the third book by Edgar Rice Burroughs to feature his famous leopard-print-loinclothed hero, sees our hero, Lord Greystoke, on a chase to save his newborn infant son from the vile hands of Russian ne-’er-do-well Nikolas Rokoff and his partner-in-crime, Alexis Paulvitch, who have escaped from prison. The villains take the kidnapped boy to a jungle island, luring both Tarzan and Jane into a trap. Unfortunately, husband and wife are separated, neither one knowing the fate of the other or that of their child. Fortunately, the villains do not count on Tarzan’s dormant jungle survival skills. He quickly gains beastly allies in a black panther, an intelligent gorilla named Akut who leads an army of gorillas, and a black African tribal warrior named Mugambi. Rokoff and Paulvitch will, of course, soon learn that it was a serious mistake to mess with Tarzan of the Apes. Exciting adventure abounds in this highly addictive series, written over a century ago.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    This third book picks up some time after the events of the first two (the first two essentially being one complete tale). Seems as if Tarzan has already established his African estate, and he and Jane divide their time between Africa and London. The book opens with Tarzan receiving the news that the previous book's antagonist Nikolas Rokoff has escaped from prison. Together with Alexander Paulvich, he plots to kidnap Tarzan and Jane's infant son in a crazy act of revenge involving handing the ba This third book picks up some time after the events of the first two (the first two essentially being one complete tale). Seems as if Tarzan has already established his African estate, and he and Jane divide their time between Africa and London. The book opens with Tarzan receiving the news that the previous book's antagonist Nikolas Rokoff has escaped from prison. Together with Alexander Paulvich, he plots to kidnap Tarzan and Jane's infant son in a crazy act of revenge involving handing the baby over to a tribe of cannibals to have him raised as a cannibal himself. It's like "Ha-ha Tarzan! You rose beyond your savage origins, but your son will become an even worse savage than you!" Somehow this plan manages to be horrific and ridiculously goofy at the same time. In the process of trying to stop Rokoff, Tarzan gets himself kidnapped, and Jane, refusing to let Tarzan handle it by himself, manages to get herself kidnapped, too. Both end up on the same ship, bound for Africa, unaware that each other is being held captive on board. There's also a Swedish Chef on board. Rokoff first maroons Tarzan on an island off the African coast (appropriately named "Jungle Island"), before heading to the continent proper. There, Tarzan beats up and or kills a bunch of Africans and Apes, and in the process manages to obtain their loyalty. Yeah. Tarzan's like that. Lord of the Jungle an' all. Oh, and he gets a kitty. So the remaining non-dead African dude, the tribe of apes, and the kitty all escape the island (Tarzan teaches the apes to paddle a canoe. I kid you not). And they head to Darkest Africa in pursuit of Rokoff. Also, the Swedish Chef helps Jane escape into the wild, and Rokoff heads off in pursuit of them. A large portion of the book is a chase. And really, it's a quite a page-turner. While I certainly enjoyed the first two books in this series (the first should really be recognized as a genuine literary classic), this one might have been more consistently exciting and gripping. Jane, herself, is a bit of a revelation for a 102-year-old book. Far from being the shrinking violet always in need of being recused by Tarzan, Jane fully embraces her mothering instincts while proving herself to be quite the badass in her own right. This is totally Jane: Except the planet is Africa, the spaceships are canoes, the aliens are Russians, the kid is a baby boy . . . and the gun . . . well, it's still a gun. There's actually some funny stuff, too. And here I'm thinking of a particular scene where Tarzan gets tied to a stake while cannibals prepare to cook him. But his tribe of loyal apes and his kitty arrive and scare everyone off. At which point Tarzan hopes they'll untie him, but the apes really don't have a clue, and the kitty just rubs against his leg and purrs. So he stands there for about a day in frustrated exasperation waiting for someone else to show up. The only flaw is really the ending where, in the last chapter, Burroughs introduces a whole new set of antagonists with complex motivations for Tarzan to beat up in order to achieve escape from Jungle Island again. Other than that, another thoroughly enjoyable entry in the series. The Swedish Chef was my favorite character.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Once again, I decided to listen to an audio book on a long ride, and this was the one I stumbled across. I had recently mentioned online that Tarzan of the books was articulate and intelligent, in contrast to his film version, but I knew this by reputation only, as I had never read a Tarzan book. Indeed, the book confirmed, but also complicated that view. When at home with Jane in England, Lord Greystoke speaks perfectly good English, and he can call upon that ability in the jungle as well when Once again, I decided to listen to an audio book on a long ride, and this was the one I stumbled across. I had recently mentioned online that Tarzan of the books was articulate and intelligent, in contrast to his film version, but I knew this by reputation only, as I had never read a Tarzan book. Indeed, the book confirmed, but also complicated that view. When at home with Jane in England, Lord Greystoke speaks perfectly good English, and he can call upon that ability in the jungle as well when needed. However, in his “Tarzan” persona, he is more likely to be speaking the primitive language of apes, or attempting to communicate with a tribe of natives whose dialect differs to that he knows from the region of Africa he was raised in, so he often does come across as fairly simplistic, if not quite at the “Me Tarzan – You Jane” level. Implicit in Tarzan’s use of language, and really all other elements of the novel is a strongly Social Darwinist understanding of the world and concepts such as savagery and the primitive. African languages (and people) are presumed to be one step closer to apes than civilized (white) language and culture is. Apes are a step lower, and the panther appears to be at still a lower level, although Tarzan manages to communicate with it as well, through purrs and growls. Tarzan himself, of course, represents an idealized Noble Savage, who transcends civilized values but remains superior to the true natives and animals of Africa. The villains of the story are degenerate, pseudo-civilized men of “questionable” origin: Russians, Slavs, Swedes, Asians, etc. They are also universally notable for their cowardice, something that could never be applied to the African natives we encounter, who generally react with courage, or at worst with rational fear, when confronted by Tarzan and his army of monsters. The plot of this book begins with the escape of Rokoff, Tarzan’s long-standing enemy, from prison, and his threatening revenge against Tarzan through Jane and his infant son. Jane and Tarzan are captured and taken to Africa, Tarzan escapes and begins recruiting apes, panthers, and natives to help him recover his wife and child. He fights and kills men and beasts along the way, and the ardors that Jane suffers are described in detail. It’s all reasonably entertaining in its way, but I didn’t find that it engaged me on the long drive as well as the Agatha Christie novel I listened to last time. Maybe I’ll stick with mysteries when I drive up for ACRL in March.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Raj

    I've read very little Burroughs and no Tarzan so when I found this slim volume going cheap at a con I grabbed it. The writing style is fairly simplistic but once you get past that and the casual racism (the assumption that white men are superior to the jungle 'savages' is omnipresent but not pushed down your throat; and a tribe leader that Tarzan befriends is counted as one of the eponymous 'beasts' of Tarzan) it's quite a fun story. Tarzan's arch-nemesis Nikolas Rokoff has escaped from prison a I've read very little Burroughs and no Tarzan so when I found this slim volume going cheap at a con I grabbed it. The writing style is fairly simplistic but once you get past that and the casual racism (the assumption that white men are superior to the jungle 'savages' is omnipresent but not pushed down your throat; and a tribe leader that Tarzan befriends is counted as one of the eponymous 'beasts' of Tarzan) it's quite a fun story. Tarzan's arch-nemesis Nikolas Rokoff has escaped from prison and is hell-bent on getting revenge. To this end, he kidnaps Tarzan's wife and child and strands the ape-man himself on a jungle island. Yeah, that's like locking the A-Team in a shed, they're helpless, right? It's not long before Tarzan escapes at the head of a pack formed of a panther, tribe of ape-men and tribe leader to rescue his family. I sort of wish I'd encountered the Tarzan novels when I was younger, they are perfect teenage boy books with lots adventure and men's men where villains are dispatched in appropriately gruesome ways. In saying that, it is very much of its time and the racism and implicit (and sometimes explicit) suggestion that white men are the supreme form of Humanity doesn't sit well. However, if you can ignore that (and it's a big if), there's a lot of enjoyment to be had from this simple story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Pinchback

    Here's the deal. Edgar Rice Burrows wrote racist things in his Tarzan books. He didn't have a terribly high view of Africans. Sometimes the racism is overt, and sometimes it's more subtle, but it's there. The question for me is whether I want to let this racism ruin what are otherwise reasonably entertaining novels. I'm reading these in order, and I felt like the first two novels had "I'm going to enjoy these books but not recommend them to my nephews" levels of racism. The racism is bad, to be Here's the deal. Edgar Rice Burrows wrote racist things in his Tarzan books. He didn't have a terribly high view of Africans. Sometimes the racism is overt, and sometimes it's more subtle, but it's there. The question for me is whether I want to let this racism ruin what are otherwise reasonably entertaining novels. I'm reading these in order, and I felt like the first two novels had "I'm going to enjoy these books but not recommend them to my nephews" levels of racism. The racism is bad, to be sure, but it isn't overt or consistent enough to completely remove me from the story. The third novel, however, WAS overtly and consistently racist enough to pull me out of the story. It really pissed me off, as a matter of fact. So now I'm at a point where I have to decide whether or not I keep reading these novels. It's a shame, because Tarzan is such a great character. But I'm also really tired of reading about "savage" Africans. Right or wrong, I guess everyone has to decide what their threshold for this kind of thing is. Can we use the old "different time" justification and simply ignore the racism? Should we reject these novels altogether? Fuck, I don't know. I doubt the answer is either one of those extremes, but, seriously, I have no idea. I do know that I don't like the way I feel when I think about this issue. If people weren't such dicks, things would be easier.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ericka Clouther

    There are so many things wrong with this third book in the series. The racism everyone knows about. Though I continue to think that it's also generalized misanthropy because while the author's language is racist, the human characters are mostly all the same regardless of race. The animals are the noblest and most moral characters. Unfortunately, the animals might also be the most interesting characters as all the other characters appear to be extremely one-dimensional. Also, the story dragged on There are so many things wrong with this third book in the series. The racism everyone knows about. Though I continue to think that it's also generalized misanthropy because while the author's language is racist, the human characters are mostly all the same regardless of race. The animals are the noblest and most moral characters. Unfortunately, the animals might also be the most interesting characters as all the other characters appear to be extremely one-dimensional. Also, the story dragged on so much. It could have ended several chapters before it did, but instead, the author created additional one-dimensional bad guys to oppose. So what did I like? I liked the crazy troupe of animals. This is probably the book in the series that most inspired the cartoon Disney version of Tarzan (along with book #1). I liked that Jane gets the opportunity to be kind of a bad ass in this one. I liked that there were additional good guys in this story, and I enjoyed their contributions. As for the action, it has everything- fighting, animals, ships, explosions.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Al Datum

    If you want to know what great pulp fiction is like, read Edgar Rice Burroughs. Writing of this style is in line with the thinking of the times...that there could be an ideal and perfect man who is both brilliant and physically superior. You can see this in other characters of the times like Doc Savage. It represented the modernist thinking that man can achieve perfection through his own efforts (and, indeed, was on the verge of doing so). While this thinking was clearly wrong, it made for some If you want to know what great pulp fiction is like, read Edgar Rice Burroughs. Writing of this style is in line with the thinking of the times...that there could be an ideal and perfect man who is both brilliant and physically superior. You can see this in other characters of the times like Doc Savage. It represented the modernist thinking that man can achieve perfection through his own efforts (and, indeed, was on the verge of doing so). While this thinking was clearly wrong, it made for some great stories. Tarzan is an example of one of those intellectual and physical giants (there is no "me Tarzan...you Jane") in these stories. The books are fascinating, and you can easily spend an afternoon immersed in Tarzan's adventures in Africa and beyond (even inside the hollow earth populated by prehistoric creatures and savage tribes in one story!). Don't trust the movies (virtually all of them terrible) or even the TV series. Read the books for yourself. You'll be thankful you did.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Hodder

    All the usual ERB cautions apply: this is racist and sexist, character motivations are cartoon-level basic, and the plot, which takes the form of a prolonged chase, is plain silly. Normally, with this sort of thing, I’m able to consider it in its historical context and thus get past the dated content to enjoy the pulp action. However, with this one, the repeated threats of rape levelled at Jane by the Russian villain, Rokoff, are so deeply unpalatable that I found the whole novel overshadowed by All the usual ERB cautions apply: this is racist and sexist, character motivations are cartoon-level basic, and the plot, which takes the form of a prolonged chase, is plain silly. Normally, with this sort of thing, I’m able to consider it in its historical context and thus get past the dated content to enjoy the pulp action. However, with this one, the repeated threats of rape levelled at Jane by the Russian villain, Rokoff, are so deeply unpalatable that I found the whole novel overshadowed by them, and I was glad to finish it, having not much enjoyed it at all.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    This is getting so tiresome. Stop separating the lovers and always returning to the jungle! Ugh. But I cant say that haven't still made a lot of progress. They're together, they have a son, some long time enemies are gone. They've come a long way in spite of all their setbacks. And Jane is a damsel in distress but she's never been a weakling and continues not to be. I like that! But seriously, these adventures are redundant (even within each book) and insane. But it reminds me of the formulaic w This is getting so tiresome. Stop separating the lovers and always returning to the jungle! Ugh. But I cant say that haven't still made a lot of progress. They're together, they have a son, some long time enemies are gone. They've come a long way in spite of all their setbacks. And Jane is a damsel in distress but she's never been a weakling and continues not to be. I like that! But seriously, these adventures are redundant (even within each book) and insane. But it reminds me of the formulaic way tv shows used to be written and I'm just glad for the progress they did make.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The nefarious Rokoff is back to exact revenge on Tarzan. Kidnapping Tarzan's son to lure Tarzan aboard a ship. Jane unwittingly falls into the trap as well so that eventually the whole gang is back in Africa! Rokoff strands Tarzan on "Jungle Island" where he enlists the aid of a panther, a group of apes and a native warrior before he makes his way to the mainland to pursue Rokoff, Jane and young Jack (or so he thinks). The rest is a non-stop chase through the jungle; through villages The nefarious Rokoff is back to exact revenge on Tarzan. Kidnapping Tarzan's son to lure Tarzan aboard a ship. Jane unwittingly falls into the trap as well so that eventually the whole gang is back in Africa! Rokoff strands Tarzan on "Jungle Island" where he enlists the aid of a panther, a group of apes and a native warrior before he makes his way to the mainland to pursue Rokoff, Jane and young Jack (or so he thinks). The rest is a non-stop chase through the jungle; through villages of both friendly and hostile tribes. Good action and some nice plot twists

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl Tribble

    This book has two of my favorite scenes from the first five books, namely Sheeta showing up and being no help whatsoever in freeing Tarazan -- "Hi, boss! So glad to see you! [rub rub] Oh, you want me to cut the rope? I have no idea what that means. Oh, you're waving your bound arms at me? Very well, I'll give them a friendly lick." -- and Jane meeting Rostov at the edge of the boat as he's trying to sneak on, one of the few scenes I've ever read that made me wish I was an artist so I could paint This book has two of my favorite scenes from the first five books, namely Sheeta showing up and being no help whatsoever in freeing Tarazan -- "Hi, boss! So glad to see you! [rub rub] Oh, you want me to cut the rope? I have no idea what that means. Oh, you're waving your bound arms at me? Very well, I'll give them a friendly lick." -- and Jane meeting Rostov at the edge of the boat as he's trying to sneak on, one of the few scenes I've ever read that made me wish I was an artist so I could paint Jane from Rostov's view. Aside from that it's more of the usual Tarzanish fun.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    I should really go save a panther and make him my best friend. That would be sick.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gerhard

    As always pure nostalgia reading a ERB filled with mystical/mythical characters of my youth that I grew up with. Love it as always for its entertainment value rather than a sophisticated novel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    read between 5-24-75 &12-31-1975

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This series is great, but by the third book it started to become repetitive.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Skjam!

    John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, and his lovely wife Jane have settled down in London with their infant son Jack. I guess this is the end of the adventures of Tarzan since everyone knows that marriage and children mean that you’re never going to be interesting again. But wait! John’s old friend, Lieutenant D’Arnot, has news! It seems that the archcriminal Rokoff and his henchman Paulvitch have escaped French prison and are on the loose. Realizing that Rokoff will stop at nothing to get h John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, and his lovely wife Jane have settled down in London with their infant son Jack. I guess this is the end of the adventures of Tarzan since everyone knows that marriage and children mean that you’re never going to be interesting again. But wait! John’s old friend, Lieutenant D’Arnot, has news! It seems that the archcriminal Rokoff and his henchman Paulvitch have escaped French prison and are on the loose. Realizing that Rokoff will stop at nothing to get his revenge for his earlier defeat, Lord Greystoke returns to the British capital. But it is too late. The wily Rokoff (aided by the French government keeping his escape a secret) has already succeeded in kidnapping Jack. John and Jane are then captured separately, and the entire family is taken on the same boat (but unaware of each other) to Africa. Rokoff strands John naked and weaponless on an island well off the coast, boasting that he will have Jack adopted by a tribe of cannibals and indoctrinated into their customs, and will do even worse to Jane. But Rokoff has made an error. For without the trappings of civilization, brought back to the jungle climes that nurtured him, John Clayton becomes again Tarzan, Lord of the Apes! This is the third of the Tarzan books, originally published in magazine form in 1914. ERB was hitting his stride, this action-packed volume reassured readers that they would get to enjoy many more tales of the jungle hero. Tarzan soon arms himself and gains the loyalty of not just a band of intelligent apes like those that raised him, led by the exceptionally smart Akut, but Sheeta the panther, and soon the native warrior Mugambi. This allows Tarzan to escape the island with his motley crew and go in pursuit of Rokoff and his minions, who are headed up a river to the cannibal tribe previously mentioned. The good: Lots of action and peril which moves the story along quickly, and some surprising twists. Jane has learned something of jungle survival since the first book, and while she’s no physical match for her male captors, the moment Jane sees an opportunity, she’s rescuing herself and the child. Both Jane and Tarzan are gracious people who are kind when circumstances allow, and this comes back to help them in time of need. We also get some interesting minor characters, Sven Anderssen the Norwegian sailor who’s a lot smarter than he lets on, and Tambudza, the cannibal granny. Not so good: Burroughs was very fond of coincidences, and they run rampant in this book, from the way Tarzan and Jane keep missing each other, to the completely separate group of stranded sailors that shows up at the end. Also, Rokoff is a weak villain whose plans for revenge are overly elaborate and rely on too many things going just right. Indeed, he would have done much better to simply head straight to Africa without ever having interacted with the Clayton family. The ugly: Racism. Tarzan slaughters everyone else in Mugambi’s hunting party (in fairness, they tried to kill him first) and Mugambi sheds not a tear nor ever thinks of them again, soon coming to have complete loyalty to the terrifyingly powerful white man. Plus that whole cannibal tribe thing. Parents of younger readers may want to talk to their children about outdated stereotypes of African people. Overall, this is a rip-roaring pulp adventure in the old style and well worth looking up if you can forgive the period racism. Recommended especially to fans of the movies.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Greg Strom

    So if Jane had just let justice prevail and allow Tarzan to snap the neck of Nikolas Rokoff all would have been fine. I imagine we could have spent some time with the happy newlyweds learning how they adjust to married life, return to London, spending a gazillion dollars worth of gold ingots, etc, but nooooo, cut to having a kid and life in peril. I would go into how very unlikely most of the happenstance is, and the surprise of another boat crew full of losers could appear in the last 10 pages So if Jane had just let justice prevail and allow Tarzan to snap the neck of Nikolas Rokoff all would have been fine. I imagine we could have spent some time with the happy newlyweds learning how they adjust to married life, return to London, spending a gazillion dollars worth of gold ingots, etc, but nooooo, cut to having a kid and life in peril. I would go into how very unlikely most of the happenstance is, and the surprise of another boat crew full of losers could appear in the last 10 pages leads me to believe the ending wasn't exactly worked out ahead of time. I will say I enjoyed his new found ape friends and their loyalty as well as Sheeta (though one wonders how it climbed monkey ladder from skiff to boat, minor detail). Very interesting revelation by Tarzan as he contemplated killing fellow for his weapons only to discover that he could use his words and humanity to do so much more. Perhaps there is a lesson in that for our world leaders...it's not too late! All the coming and going from boat to boat, tribe to tribe, now your captured again, now free, shows there really is only so much you can do in the jungle and theme seemed to repeat itself more than a few times, hence the score of 3, 3.5 really as I am going to continue my quest to finish series unless it becomes just too ridiculous (esp with kid coming into the picture). we shall see.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Burroughs followed the super-strong Return of Tarzan with another solid thriller in Beasts. I have a hard time deciding which I like better. Return is cool because it hops genres and settings, going from a fish-out-of-water in Paris story to espionage in North Africa and then on to adventures at sea and in lost jungle cities. I love the variety. Beasts is less episodic. It's a focused thriller with Tarzan's tracking Jane and their son through the jungle in order to rescue them from kidnappers. Even coo/>/> Burroughs followed the super-strong Return of Tarzan with another solid thriller in Beasts. I have a hard time deciding which I like better. Return is cool because it hops genres and settings, going from a fish-out-of-water in Paris story to espionage in North Africa and then on to adventures at sea and in lost jungle cities. I love the variety. Beasts is less episodic. It's a focused thriller with Tarzan's tracking Jane and their son through the jungle in order to rescue them from kidnappers. Even cooler, Tarzan's accompanied by an awesome company of apes, humans, and a panther. What I always love about Burroughs is his ability to jump between groups of characters: following Tarzan for a while, then Jane, then back to Tarzan, with his fearsome companions weaving between the two to terrify villains and thrill readers. I got a little impatient at the end when the story seemed to be going on longer than necessary, but Burroughs pays it off spectacularly and I was glad to have the extra pages.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I inherited a Tarzan lot from my Dad and had read the first "Tarzan of the Apes" I really enjoyed but the story got a little too far fetched for me towards the end. This book is similar, a little violent, but that might be expected. I followed the story most of the way until I thought the situation was nearly resolved, when another whole plot appeared with new characters which were a little hard for me to keep track. Both Tarzan books I read are very well written and some of the adjectives used I inherited a Tarzan lot from my Dad and had read the first "Tarzan of the Apes" I really enjoyed but the story got a little too far fetched for me towards the end. This book is similar, a little violent, but that might be expected. I followed the story most of the way until I thought the situation was nearly resolved, when another whole plot appeared with new characters which were a little hard for me to keep track. Both Tarzan books I read are very well written and some of the adjectives used to describe scenes and events are downright entertaining! One thing I liked about this one was the cooperation of the animals which, as an animal fan, I was pleasantly amused by. It's probably a matter of 'if you like Tarzan books, you'll like this'. I'm just OK with the entire concept myself so maybe this review will help someone who hasn't read any before.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    This a convoluted series of unfortunate, dangerous events and near misses as the main characters seek to find, rescue and get away from each other. Tarzan’s son is kidnapped by Rokoff and when Tarzan and Jane try to recover him they too are captured. Tarzan ends up marooned on an uninhabited island, while Jane and their baby flee into the interior of the African jungle. And from there the crazy action continues. Footnote: 1) Interesting that Thuran was onboard ships in the This a convoluted series of unfortunate, dangerous events and near misses as the main characters seek to find, rescue and get away from each other. Tarzan’s son is kidnapped by Rokoff and when Tarzan and Jane try to recover him they too are captured. Tarzan ends up marooned on an uninhabited island, while Jane and their baby flee into the interior of the African jungle. And from there the crazy action continues. Footnote: 1) Interesting that Thuran was onboard ships in the previous 2 books where no mention of his being prone seasickness was made. 2) I wonder if Tarzan applied for a permit and had an inspection before transporting wild animals across the border. Lol. Fave scenes: the ape & panther victory cry’s, Tarzan’s tribe rescues him, Jane’s escape from the ‘Kincaid’, the crocodile and Tarzan & Akut’s good-bye.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Foster

    Such a great story. Tarzan has again been marooned on an island of the coast of Africa. The plotting of Rokoff, a self-named nemesis of Tarzan, has once again threatened him, but not just Tarzan, Rokoff has planned something for Jane and the baby as well. Rokoff was such a villain, I'd tell you why but that would ruin some surprising plot twists in this story. On this unfamiliar island, Tarzan's compassion to the trapped Sheeta has given him a feline companion that he can communicate Such a great story. Tarzan has again been marooned on an island of the coast of Africa. The plotting of Rokoff, a self-named nemesis of Tarzan, has once again threatened him, but not just Tarzan, Rokoff has planned something for Jane and the baby as well. Rokoff was such a villain, I'd tell you why but that would ruin some surprising plot twists in this story. On this unfamiliar island, Tarzan's compassion to the trapped Sheeta has given him a feline companion that he can communicate with a series of purrs and vocalizations. His knowledge of the language of the great bull-ape has gifted him with a loyal tribe of the apes of Akut. Tarzan is the leader of a savage battle team, that, at his call, will rend human flesh and make short work of an opponent, even if they are well armed.

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