Hot Best Seller

The Bloomington-Normal Circus Legacy: The Golden Age of Aerialists

Availability: Ready to download

Starting in the 1870s, the barns, icehouses, gymnasiums and empty theaters of central Illinois provided the practice sites for aerial performers whose names still command reverence in the annals of American circus history. Meet Fred Miltimore and the Green Brothers, runaways from the Fourth Ward School who became the first Bloomington-born flyers. Watch Art Concello, a ten Starting in the 1870s, the barns, icehouses, gymnasiums and empty theaters of central Illinois provided the practice sites for aerial performers whose names still command reverence in the annals of American circus history. Meet Fred Miltimore and the Green Brothers, runaways from the Fourth Ward School who became the first Bloomington-born flyers. Watch Art Concello, a ten-year-old truant, become first a world-class flyer, then a famous trapeze impresario and finally Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus's most successful general manager. The entire art of the trapeze--instruction, training, performance and management--became a Bloomington-Normal industry during the tented shows' golden age, when finding a circus flying act without a connection to this area would have been virtually impossible.


Compare

Starting in the 1870s, the barns, icehouses, gymnasiums and empty theaters of central Illinois provided the practice sites for aerial performers whose names still command reverence in the annals of American circus history. Meet Fred Miltimore and the Green Brothers, runaways from the Fourth Ward School who became the first Bloomington-born flyers. Watch Art Concello, a ten Starting in the 1870s, the barns, icehouses, gymnasiums and empty theaters of central Illinois provided the practice sites for aerial performers whose names still command reverence in the annals of American circus history. Meet Fred Miltimore and the Green Brothers, runaways from the Fourth Ward School who became the first Bloomington-born flyers. Watch Art Concello, a ten-year-old truant, become first a world-class flyer, then a famous trapeze impresario and finally Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus's most successful general manager. The entire art of the trapeze--instruction, training, performance and management--became a Bloomington-Normal industry during the tented shows' golden age, when finding a circus flying act without a connection to this area would have been virtually impossible.

24 review for The Bloomington-Normal Circus Legacy: The Golden Age of Aerialists

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    In 1944 the Flying Concellos, who flew with the Clyde Beatty and Russell Brothers Combined Circus were billed as "Absolutely Fearless Performers Who Scoff at the Laws of Gravity and Fly Through the Air Like Winged Birds."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    My daughter attends college at Illinois State in Normal. I always wondered why they had a college circus there. This book gives the background on the college circus by exposing the history of aerialists, or trapeze artists, that had strong connections to the area. The book details literally dozens of artists who came from the area or moved there to be trained by the best in the business. There are a number of interesting photos of historic aerialist troops, circus advertisements, circus life, an My daughter attends college at Illinois State in Normal. I always wondered why they had a college circus there. This book gives the background on the college circus by exposing the history of aerialists, or trapeze artists, that had strong connections to the area. The book details literally dozens of artists who came from the area or moved there to be trained by the best in the business. There are a number of interesting photos of historic aerialist troops, circus advertisements, circus life, and performance and training structures – tents and training barns. I found the stories of the different performers and managers quite interesting as well. Many performance highlights are described, but so are the often very smart moves by managers of acts and of entire circuses. The authors do a fine job of showing the connections between the acts over the space of a half a century or more. The stories end in the 1960s with the circus centralizing their winter headquarters in Florida. I would have appreciated more on the lasting influence of Bloomingtonites on the circus, including the YMCA and college circuses that may have continued – the stories seemed to have faded out with a Bloomington native running the industry-leading Barnum & Bailey Circus. Overall, I found this a well-written and well-informed local history.

  3. 5 out of 5

    meg

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark Carter

  5. 4 out of 5

    Judas Lukas

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lacey Bordewick

  7. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  8. 4 out of 5

    Corgi

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Stowe

  10. 5 out of 5

    Criticalinquiryconsortiyumyum

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily Olsen

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ros

  14. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  16. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josiphine/Tessa

  18. 5 out of 5

    Apilrain

  19. 5 out of 5

    R

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becky

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Lee

  22. 4 out of 5

    dreamer of art

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marian Hood

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.