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FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA

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FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA is a bestselling novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery . It was written as fiction for readers of all ages, but in recent decades has been considered a children's book. Montgomery found her inspiration for the book on an old piece of paper that she had written at a young age, describing a couple that were mistakenly sent an orphan girl FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA is a bestselling novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery . It was written as fiction for readers of all ages, but in recent decades has been considered a children's book. Montgomery found her inspiration for the book on an old piece of paper that she had written at a young age, describing a couple that were mistakenly sent an orphan girl instead of a boy, yet decided to keep her. Montgomery also drew upon her own childhood experiences in rural Prince Edward Island. Montgomery used a photograph of Evelyn Nesbit, which she had clipped from New York’s Metropolitan Magazine, and pasted the framed clipping on the wall of her bedroom Montgomery also found inspiration in the "formula Ann" orphan stories, the Anns without the e. Other characters, like Gilbert Blythe, were modelled, in part, on real-life characters. Montgomery wrote the novel in the twilight of the day, sitting at her window and overlooking the fields of Cavendish. FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA : Get all 10 Books In One Set Contents Book 1 ANNE OF GREEN GABLES Book 2 CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA Book 3 RAINBOW VALLEY Book 4 Rilla of Ingleside Book 5 Anne's House of Dreams Book 6 ANNE OF THE ISLAND Book 7 ANNE OF AVONLEA Book 8 FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA Book 9 ANNE OF WINDY POPLARS Book 10 ANNE OF INGLESIDE The Authorized FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA ( 10 Books nnotated Edition ) for Kindle Edition offers reader special Kindle enabled features, including interactive table of contents.Easy to use table of contents take you right to the chapter and verse you are looking for


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FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA is a bestselling novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery . It was written as fiction for readers of all ages, but in recent decades has been considered a children's book. Montgomery found her inspiration for the book on an old piece of paper that she had written at a young age, describing a couple that were mistakenly sent an orphan girl FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA is a bestselling novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery . It was written as fiction for readers of all ages, but in recent decades has been considered a children's book. Montgomery found her inspiration for the book on an old piece of paper that she had written at a young age, describing a couple that were mistakenly sent an orphan girl instead of a boy, yet decided to keep her. Montgomery also drew upon her own childhood experiences in rural Prince Edward Island. Montgomery used a photograph of Evelyn Nesbit, which she had clipped from New York’s Metropolitan Magazine, and pasted the framed clipping on the wall of her bedroom Montgomery also found inspiration in the "formula Ann" orphan stories, the Anns without the e. Other characters, like Gilbert Blythe, were modelled, in part, on real-life characters. Montgomery wrote the novel in the twilight of the day, sitting at her window and overlooking the fields of Cavendish. FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA : Get all 10 Books In One Set Contents Book 1 ANNE OF GREEN GABLES Book 2 CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA Book 3 RAINBOW VALLEY Book 4 Rilla of Ingleside Book 5 Anne's House of Dreams Book 6 ANNE OF THE ISLAND Book 7 ANNE OF AVONLEA Book 8 FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA Book 9 ANNE OF WINDY POPLARS Book 10 ANNE OF INGLESIDE The Authorized FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA ( 10 Books nnotated Edition ) for Kindle Edition offers reader special Kindle enabled features, including interactive table of contents.Easy to use table of contents take you right to the chapter and verse you are looking for

30 review for FURTHER CHRONICLES OF AVONLEA

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Although I adore Lucy Maud Montgomery and consider her a perennial favourite, this collection of short stories (her Further Chronicles of Avonlea has never managed to achieve this exalted status for me. True, many of the presented offerings are as sweet and as poignant as ever and some even rate amongst my very favourites (I appreciate the combination of humour and pathos in many of the stories and especially the tale of the dream child, I not only love, it also sends delicious and sad shivers u Although I adore Lucy Maud Montgomery and consider her a perennial favourite, this collection of short stories (her Further Chronicles of Avonlea has never managed to achieve this exalted status for me. True, many of the presented offerings are as sweet and as poignant as ever and some even rate amongst my very favourites (I appreciate the combination of humour and pathos in many of the stories and especially the tale of the dream child, I not only love, it also sends delicious and sad shivers up and down my spine every time I read it). However, the fact remains that L. M. Montgomery did NOT WANT this selection of short stories published, and had made this abundantly clear to her American publisher L. L. Page (who promptly ignored her wishes and desires, and proceeded to publish the collection as Further Chronicles of Avonlea). And this fact, and that L. M. Montgomery was in a long and drawn out court challenge against said publisher (the stress of which played havoc with and on her already frail and fragile nerves) is already enough to always make me cringe somewhat even when reading my best-loved stories of the collection (now I still do read and enjoy them, but yes, I always rather feel guilty when I do and that I do). But furthermore (and perhaps even more importantly), the last selection of Further Chronicles from Avonlea, Tannis of the Flats is the ONLY piece of L.M. Montgomery's shorter fiction that I truly and actively despise with every fibre of my being, a racist stereotyping hate-mongering diatribe against both Native Canadians and the Métis I have actually only managed to read once in its entirity (and which I always deliberately skip when I do my rereads). Still, a recommended collection of stories is Further Chronicles of Avonlea (some of which tales are indeed absolutely outstanding), but with the caveat of the rather unsavoury backstory, and a major warning with regard to the racially insensitive and simply nauseating Tannis of the Flats (and while I do realise that perhaps my own reaction to the latter is a bit overly extreme and personal, the entire premise of Tannis of the Flats just bothers me to no end).

  2. 4 out of 5

    kris

    WILDLY uneven. So uneven that I'm doing mini-reviews to attempt to figure out how to actually rate this thing. Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat An eccentric Aunt asks her nieces to look after her finicky Persian cat and hijinks (and ROMANCE) ensue! Fun, sweet, slightly silly: peak Montgomery. 4 stars. The Materializing of Cecil One of the town spinsters creates a spurned beaux for herself—and then he rides into town a few weeks later! Probably my favorite of the lot: almost all of the other stories I had WILDLY uneven. So uneven that I'm doing mini-reviews to attempt to figure out how to actually rate this thing. Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat An eccentric Aunt asks her nieces to look after her finicky Persian cat and hijinks (and ROMANCE) ensue! Fun, sweet, slightly silly: peak Montgomery. 4 stars. The Materializing of Cecil One of the town spinsters creates a spurned beaux for herself—and then he rides into town a few weeks later! Probably my favorite of the lot: almost all of the other stories I had no problem putting down, but this one made me finish. 5 stars. Her Father’s Daughter A young woman is determined to have her long-estranged father at her wedding but her stubborn mother says NAY. This was sweet and another good encapsulation of what Montgomery does: family stories with warmth and forgiveness and all that gooey crap. 3.5 stars. Jane’s Baby Estranged sisters battle for custody of the baby of a dead friend. Slightly unenjoyable because both sisters seem kind of ridiculous. 3 stars. The Dream-Child After the unexpected death of her son, a woman is haunted by the ghostly wails of her "dream-child". "Spooky" and sentimental: not my favorite but that's far more about personal taste than anything else. 3 stars. The Brother Who Failed During a family reunion, the eldest brother realizes that because he doesn't have money or talent, he's somehow a """failure""". To fix this, his family stop patting themselves on the back long enough to say thanks to him for his efforts to help them succeed. Yes, my cynical face didn't find this nearly as "heart-warming" as I think I was meant to: the only reason anyone even bothers to say any of the nice things they do is because they realize the eldest brother has HEARD someone point out what a failure he is—which is kind of a lame reason to thank an allegedly "important" person. IDK: it just felt gimmicky and cheap? 3.5 stars. The Return of Hester Before dying, the eldest sister makes her sibling promise never to marry the man she loves because...reasons. These reasons mean nothing because her sister comes back as a ghost in order to allow them to marry because of the Power of Love in the Afterlife or something. Pointless and really didn't do it for me. 2.5 stars. The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily Narrated by our own Anne Shirley, this book tells the story of the spinster Emily who absolutely no one likes until she dies and her Tragic Romance is exposed. A little too pat ("don't judge a book by its cover") and kind of disappointing because Anne comes across as a flat, judgmental little monster. 2.5 stars. Sara's Way A girl who likes to tend to damaged things refuses the marry the village Saint until he loses all his money. YIKES. This was the first inkling of something being strangely off about these stories because what in the hell is supposed to be romantic about this story? 2 stars. The Son of His Mother A mother ADORES her son to the point where she makes him promise not to marry his love, which is obviously CREEPY AF and NOT A HEALTHY MOTHER-SON RELATIONSHIP. This is only somewhat resolved by the end of the story but as this theme crops up in so many other of these stories, I'M STILL JUDGING IT. HARD. 2 stars The Education of Betty The narrator ends up taking over the education of the daughter (Betty) of his former beaux and best friend. After she grows up into the ~perfect woman, he decides HE'S LOVE WITH HER. YIKES. YIIIIIIIIIKES. I honestly don't have a problem with a May-December romance. What I DO have a problem with is the "grooming" of a CHILD into an "ideal woman". What I DO have a problem with is the heavy focus on how she touches him when he's still viewing her as a CHILD because he is TWENTY YEARS OLDER THAN HER AND WAS PRESENT FOR HER FORMATIVE YEARS/PUBERTY/ETC. What I DO have a problem with is the fact that he basically RAISED her and she refers to him as "Father Robert" at one point AND SOMEHOW WE'RE STILL SUPPOSED TO BELIEVE THAT THIS IS ROMANTIC LOVE???? IDK, man: that shit's disgusting. (ALSO IT'S IN FIRST PERSON AND SOMEHOW THAT MAKES IT SO MUCH WORSEEEEEE.) .5 stars. In Her Selfless Mood A dying mother extracts a promise from her undervalued daughter to take care of her preferred child, who turns out to be something of an asshole. After a lot of suffering and sadness and unconditional love in the fact of epic douchery, everyone dies. 2 stars. The Conscience Case of David Bell An evangelist comes to town and everyone judges one of the church's elders for not standing up to "testify". Eventually he does and it's because he's got a ~huge confession, y'all. This was fine but boring? Also slightly uncomfortable for me because I remember those kinds of "call outs" from my childhood and the groupthink mentality of society never seems to change. 2 stars. Only a Common Fellow A woman is set to marry a man she doesn't love, believing her soulmate to be dead except WHO'S THAT KNOCKING AT THE FRONT DOOR? Sweet but too brief: if this had been expanded to match the COMPLETELY unnecessary length of The Education of Betty, I probably would have liked it SO MUCH MORE. 3 stars. Tannis of the Flats A man flirts with a half-First Nations woman before falling in love with a white woman and getting his dumb, racist ass shot to death. PROBLEMATIC AF. Tannis is referred to as a "half-Breed" and the "Indians" are stereotyped as lazy, gossipy leaches on society, and it's GROSS and DISGUSTING and WHAT A WAY TO FINISH THIS BOOK JESUS FUCKING CHRIST. .5 stars. (I'm going to give this disaster 2.5 stars, rounding up to 3: ultimately, there are like 3-4 stories I would recommend and also 3-4 stories I would recommend you tear out of your copies and LIGHT ON FIRE and then DANCE ON THE ASHES to EXORCISE THE GHOSTS OF WHATEVER HELLBEASTS SPAWNED THEM.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Another wonderful collection of charming Avonlea short stories, ranging from the humorous to melodramatic, and every bit as enticing and delightful as the first book, Chronicles of Avonlea. I was going to give it a full 5, but the last few stories weren’t quite so good as the rest, and I was a teeny tiny bit disappointed. Nevertheless I had a magical time reading this book, as is always the case when reading anything written by Montgomery. Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat (4 stars): This one was the Another wonderful collection of charming Avonlea short stories, ranging from the humorous to melodramatic, and every bit as enticing and delightful as the first book, Chronicles of Avonlea. I was going to give it a full 5, but the last few stories weren’t quite so good as the rest, and I was a teeny tiny bit disappointed. Nevertheless I had a magical time reading this book, as is always the case when reading anything written by Montgomery. Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat (4 stars): This one was the funniest of the lot, definitely aimed as a fun little comedy where two women must watch their aunt’s detestable cat, only to find it disappearing under their very noses. The twists were predictable, but it was a fun little story. The Materializing of Cecil (4 stars): This was another fun one, where a spinster one day invents a story about having once been engaged to a Mr. Cecil Fenwick of Blakely, New-Brunswick, but everything goes awry for her when a real Mr. Cecil Fenwick from Blakely, New-Brunswick shows up in town! That story made for a really good episode in season 1 of Road to Avonlea, where Marilla Cuthbert is the one who invents a story about a former lover (The Materializing of Duncan McTavish). Her Father’s Daughter (5 stars): I absolutely loved this beautiful story of a young woman determined to have her long-lost father attend her wedding day. It was incredibly good, heart-wrenching, sad, and mysterious all at the same time. I loved it! Jane’s Baby (3 stars): Two sisters fight for the care of a deceased friend’s baby, one going so far as to actually steal the baby from her sister’s house! It was good for the most part, if slightly less entertaining, and the main character was a little irritating. The Dream-Child (2 stars): This one was very creepy, and I did not enjoy it. It was about a woman who starts losing her mind after her baby dies, and she starts hearing voices at night and thinks he is calling out to her and that she must save him. It was all storms in the night and chills and madness. The Brother Who Failed (5 stars): This one was so moving I actually teared-up. It was probably the most simple (maybe even boring, from a certain viewpoint) story, but I just found it so powerful, and so beautiful!! After hearing hurtful comments about him, a man feels really downtrodden and useless, and his family proceeds to show him exactly just how important and loved he’s always been. *sniff* The Return of Hester (3 stars): Another one slightly creepy, if still quite satisfactory. A woman resists marrying her soulmate on account of her disapproving sister, and it is only after she is passed away that the sister realizes her mistake. The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily (4 stars): This one was a very enjoyable narrative by Anne of Green Gables herself, who is been given Miss Emily’s chest upon the latter’s death. In it she finds a diary, and she and Diana learn her tragic love story. Very bittersweet, but quite a good read. Sara’s Way (3 stars): I liked it, but not nearly half as good as it could have been. Sara’s way is basically starting to like something or someone once they suffer a misfortune and/or are being neglected or rejected. The Son of His Mother (3 stars): Another one with an unfortunately annoying main character, an overprotective and overbearing mother who LOVES her son so much that no one else is allowed to even look at him. I liked the twist the story took, but overall it was a little too overdramatic. The Education of Betty (5 stars): I was almost considering giving the book 5 stars for this story alone. Definitely my favourite of the lot, it was just so good, and so romantic. A beautiful guardian-falls-in-love-with-his-pupil tale, without being in the slightest bit icky. It was just amazing. In Her Selfless Mood (3 stars): I think this is the only one that is sad, without a real happy ending. A dying woman extracts a promise from her daughter that she will look out for her younger brother and protect him, and she takes it to such lengths that she never lives her own life and is never really happy. The Conscience Case of David Bell (2 stars): Definitely my least favourite, and I would give it a 1 were it not for the flawless writing. But it was yawningly boring, and nothing exceptional happened at all. Pretty much a waste of time. Only a Common Fellow (4 stars): This one was another quite touching romance which I really enjoyed, about a woman about to enter into a loveless marriage of convenience, convinced that the one she really loves is dead. Rather unmemorable characters, I must admit, but the story was good and the message was beautiful. Tannis of the Flats (2.5 stars): I don’t remember much of this one as I read it late at night and kept falling asleep over it (not a very good sign), but I remember a general feeling of being bored and irritated at the same time, although the story was not that bad. I just didn’t really like some of the turns it took, and didn’t care much for the characters. Despite the rather flat ending, I really liked this book and strongly recommend it. It’s perfect for summer afternoons reading under the sun and eating cherries, and there’s a little something for everyone to like in there, and I’m sure at least one of the stories will become a top favourite. I know I will definitely be re-reading The Brother Who Failed and The Education of Betty again!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    "I guess," said Aunt Isabel, aside to the little school teacher, as she wiped the tears from her keen old eyes, "that there's a kind of failure that's the best success." -- The Brother Who Failed Further Chronicles of Avonlea (1920, L. C. Page & Co.), second in the Chronicles of Avonlea series by L. M. Montgomery, is a collection of short stories - some romances, some not - all set in the fictional town of Avonlea in Prince Edward Island, Canada. The novel is a standalone book, and is set "I guess," said Aunt Isabel, aside to the little school teacher, as she wiped the tears from her keen old eyes, "that there's a kind of failure that's the best success." -- The Brother Who Failed Further Chronicles of Avonlea (1920, L. C. Page & Co.), second in the Chronicles of Avonlea series by L. M. Montgomery, is a collection of short stories - some romances, some not - all set in the fictional town of Avonlea in Prince Edward Island, Canada. The novel is a standalone book, and is set after Anne of Avonlea (see my review here) for certain, possibly later in the Anne series. I chose this book because I'm continuing my trend of alternating between L.M. Montgomery and Jane Austen for my audio book selections. Rating: 5 stars The stories: This list is taken directly from Wikipedia: "Aunt Cynthia's Persian Cat": Aunt Cynthia leaves her beloved Persian cat Fatima in the care of her unwilling nieces Sue and Ismay Meade. When Fatima disappears, Sue must call on desperate measures to avoid wealthy Aunt Cynthia's wrath. "The Materializing of Cecil": Unwilling to admit that she has never had a suitor, Miss Charlotte Holmes invents the dashing Cecil Fenwick of Blakely, New Brunswick to keep the Avonlea gossips at bay. When the real Cecil appears, Miss Charlotte fears the truth will emerge. "Her Father's Daughter": Rachel Spencer invites her estranged father to her wedding, to the fury of her mother Isabella. "Jane's Baby": When Jane Roberts dies, her cousins Miss Rosetta Ellis and Mrs. Charlotte Wheeler feud over her child. "The Dream-Child": A mysterious wailing calls grieving mother Josie to the seaside; she believes it is the cry of the ghost of her and David's first baby. "The Brother Who Failed": During the Monroes' reunion at the family home in Avonlea, Aunt Isabel tactlessly remarks that Robert is "the only failure," and his siblings initiate a scheme to restore his self-esteem. "The Return of Hester": Dying Hester Meredith forces her sister Margaret to promise she won't marry Hugh Blair, but when Margaret and Hugh fall desperately in love, Hester herself intervenes. "The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily": Anne Shirley and her friend Diana Barry become acquainted with irritating old maid Miss Emily Leith while they're staying at Echo Lodge in Grafton; upon Miss Emily's death, Anne receives a mysterious parcel. Narrated by Anne Shirley. "Sara's Way": Mrs. Eben Andrews discusses her daughter Sara and Sara's suitor Lige Baxter with Mrs. Jonas Andrews. When Lige's brother's business is ruined, everyone involved has a different view of the situation. "The Son of his Mother": Thyra Carewe learns that her beloved son Chester has bestowed his affections on the beautiful Damaris Garland. "The Education of Betty": Newly widowed Sara Churchill arranges for a former beau to tutor her untamed daughter Betty. "In Her Selfless Mood": Eunice Carr devotes her life to granting her mother Naomi Holland's deathbed request that she look after Christopher Holland, Naomi's son and Eunice's half-brother. "The Conscience Case of David Bell": David Bell refuses to testify in the name of Jesus Christ, to the horror of Avonlea society. "Only a Common Fellow": Story of the Mark Foster/Phillippa Clark/Owen Blair love triangle. "Tannis of the Flats": Jerome Carey, telegraph officer in "The Flats," a trading station in the Canadian Northwest, becomes the object of beautiful "half-breed" Tannis Dumont's affections, but he falls in love with Elinor Blair of Avonlea. Christian elements: I had forgotten about story number thirteen. L.M. Montgomery didn't write Christian fiction, but she was a Christian, and a minister's wife. Story thirteen is centered around a church, dealing with revival meetings where, by this time, nearly everyone in the entire town had given a testimony to encourage others. David Bell is a Christian, but has something on his conscience. Is it clean/chaste? Yes! This is an author to trust. What I liked: I loved that I still remembered the stories from when I read them as a tween and/or teen. And they still refresh me and I love the simple innocence of the plotlines. Story number six makes me cry every time I read it. I almost NEVER cry when I read. I love story number nine. (And number six.) What some might dislike: A couple of the stories are ghost stories. A couple of the stories are tragic. Tragedy is not my favorite, but Montgomery makes them beautiful, somehow. One story has a hero/heroine pair in which the hero was interested in the heroine's mother years ago. *********** The bottom line: Montgomery is such a wonderful storyteller. As a teen/tween, I read her short story collections much more often than her novels. For the instant gratification, I suppose. I recommend this book to anyone of any age, though I'd always recommend Anne of Green Gables for a first taste of Lucy Maud Montgomery. (See my review here.) I look forward to rereading more by this author, and plan to read Anne of the Island next.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Deeply adorable. I suppose there's a certain sameness to the various Avonlea shorts, but as it's a sameness I find comforting and comfortable, I can't bring myself to mind. There's something wonderfully domestic about these stories, in their small scale, in the attention they pay to women's lives and women's spaces, and I'm always delighted by how deftly Montgomery handles the characters. (We don't talk about the horrifically racist last story in the collection. We note that it is a product of i Deeply adorable. I suppose there's a certain sameness to the various Avonlea shorts, but as it's a sameness I find comforting and comfortable, I can't bring myself to mind. There's something wonderfully domestic about these stories, in their small scale, in the attention they pay to women's lives and women's spaces, and I'm always delighted by how deftly Montgomery handles the characters. (We don't talk about the horrifically racist last story in the collection. We note that it is a product of its time and we try to forget its inclusion.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rosalba

    I didn't come up with too many expectations for these stories, since I read other reviews that said they were not as good as the first Chronicles. So, to my surprise, they were really quite good. Most of them, at least. I liked Her Father's Daughter and The Son of Her Mother best of all, but The Brother Who Failed, The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily and The Education of Betty were very good too. The rest of them were,ah,well,Ok, I guess, but the last three stories were rather bad, and of I didn't come up with too many expectations for these stories, since I read other reviews that said they were not as good as the first Chronicles. So, to my surprise, they were really quite good. Most of them, at least. I liked Her Father's Daughter and The Son of Her Mother best of all, but The Brother Who Failed, The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily and The Education of Betty were very good too. The rest of them were,ah,well,Ok, I guess, but the last three stories were rather bad, and of course I am very sad to see the racism in Tannis of the Flats, but, being a woman of her time, L.M. Montgomery wasn't spared *sigh*.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Brand

    This is probably my least favourite of Montgomery's collections, although apparently these were stories rejected from Chronicles of Avonlea, which at least explains why some of them simply aren't up to her usual standards. Below is an overview of my brief thoughts on each story after reading them, but to conclude I did thoroughly enjoy Aunt Cynthia's Persian Cat, The Materializing of Cecil, The Son of His Mother and The Education of Betty. Sadly, the others were rather lacking. Recommended if yo This is probably my least favourite of Montgomery's collections, although apparently these were stories rejected from Chronicles of Avonlea, which at least explains why some of them simply aren't up to her usual standards. Below is an overview of my brief thoughts on each story after reading them, but to conclude I did thoroughly enjoy Aunt Cynthia's Persian Cat, The Materializing of Cecil, The Son of His Mother and The Education of Betty. Sadly, the others were rather lacking. Recommended if you're a serious LMM fan and enjoy short stories, but don't expect the same quality as in the first Chronicles. 6/10 overall. --- 1. Aunt Cynthia's Persian Cat - Cute if incredibly predictable story. I completely saw the twist coming but this was still very quaint. 8/10 2. The Materializing of Cecil - Incredibly cute story, even if it is very reliant on a massive coincidence. Still, this story made me smile :) 8/10 3. Her Father's Daughter - This story is completely unrealistic. As if a husband and wife wouldn't talk for 20 years over an argument, no matter how stubborn they are! LMM always features stubborn characters in her stories but this was just ridiculous. 5/10 because her writing is brilliant at always, even if the story didn't impress me. 4. Jane's Baby - This story contains some of LMM's best prose in the collection so far, but the story didn't really impress me that much and the main character was really annoying. 7/10 5. The Dream-Child - I'm afraid that this story just creeped me out. It was about a woman who lost her son and started dreaming that he was calling out to her. It was disturbing to see a woman's depression at the loss of a child being dismissed as crazy behaviour, and although this story has a happy ending it just made me feel sorry for the women in this period who had mental illnesses and were misjudged and misunderstood. This story just didn't sit right with me. 6/10 6. The Brother Who Failed - While the values expressed in this story were sound, this was pretty unexciting and very predictable. Not exactly a memorable story. 6/10 7. The Return of Hester - Another unremarkable story, very short and seemingly pointless. Pretty descriptions, though. But far too short to create any sort of emotional reaction. 6/10 8. The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily - This was a bit different from the other stories in the collection, about two girls reading a diary of an elderly woman who had recently died and finally understanding her life. It was cute and made a nice change, so I'll give it 7/10. 9. Sara's Way - Wasn't a massive fan of this one, it seemed like Sara only married Lige because she felt sorry for him! While it was nice to see that she appreciated him because of his character, not his wealth, the underlying theme was that she pitied him! Another story that felt a bit too short to really go anywhere. 6/10 10. The Son of His Mother - This was an interesting read, about a woman not ready to let go off her fully grown son who makes him choose between her and his beau. Eventually, she learns her lesson and decides to let him go to the arms of another woman. Particularly struck me as I don't think my MIL is ready to let go of my fiance yet! 8/10 11. The Education of Betty - Unconventional for Montgomery and a lovely little romance that really plays with your emotions. I just adored this one for some reason, I think it's my favourite of the whole book. Not her typical story at all but I suppose it's a pretty conventional storyline. Still, made me smile a lot as Betty's guardian slowly came to realise that he'd fallen for his charge. And didn't seem creepy at all! 9/10 12. In Her Selfless Mood - A depressing tale about a girl who follows her dying mother's wish to the letter and never lives her own life because she sticks with her younger brother to the end. I suppose she was meant to seem "selfless" but I just thought her mother's wish was selfish and ridiculous! Too sad for my liking, not typical LMM. 6/10 13. The Conscience Case of David Bell - While it was interesting to read about revival meetings in Avonlea, I ultimately found this story quite boring. Plus, I'm not a fan of people repenting in public. Repentance is between you and the Lord, not the entire church. Interesting subject but predictable and short story. 6/10 14. Only a Common Fellow - A young woman is saved from marrying a man she doesn't love to save her aunt's house when her old lover coincidentally turns up on the doorstep. Her husband to be sees that she still loves her old beau and lets them be happy, and sets her aunt free from the mortgage plans. Far too contrived and predictable for my liking. Also, LMM describes a lot of people staring out of windows from their beds in this collection. 6/10 15. Tannis of the Flats - And of course, the infamous racist story. Not too out of character for LMM, as Kilmeny of the Orchard includes very similar thoughts on superior breeds and mixing races. However, even without the racism in this story it's still very depressing. I suppose it's a bit in keeping with 'In Her Selfless Mood'. 5/10

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is a continuation of the Chronicles of Avonlea, another 15 chapters devoted to 15 sets of people in Avonlea around the same time that Anne came to Green Gables. In all honestly I found this a absolute bore but then short stories just arent my thing. I have however now finished the full Anne of Green Gables series and all books in which she makes a cameo appearance so for that I'm happy. Another series to scrub off the list.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    In general, the same remarks I made about Chronicles of Avonlea apply to Further Chronicles of Avonlea. The stories are generally enjoyable little vignettes in the life of Avonlea. However, there is one exception. The last story, "Tannis of the Flats", is so racist as to be unbearable. Here's the introduction of the titular character: "Tannis' great-grandmother had been a Cree squaw who married a French trapper. The son of this union became in due time the father of Auguste Dumont. Auguste marrie In general, the same remarks I made about Chronicles of Avonlea apply to Further Chronicles of Avonlea. The stories are generally enjoyable little vignettes in the life of Avonlea. However, there is one exception. The last story, "Tannis of the Flats", is so racist as to be unbearable. Here's the introduction of the titular character: "Tannis' great-grandmother had been a Cree squaw who married a French trapper. The son of this union became in due time the father of Auguste Dumont. Auguste married a woman whose mother was a French half-breed and whose father was a pure-bred Highland Scotchman. The result of this atrocious mixture was its justification--Tannis of the Flats--who looked as if all the blood of all the Howards might be running in her veins." The rest of the story is all about how no matter what education and training Tannis received, she was still a "breed", still savage beneath her veneer of civilization. And yet, despite her savage "breed" instincts and utter lack of the finer feelings of humanity, she still manages to perform a good deed - "In a white woman the deed would have been merely commendable. In Tannis of the Flats, with her ancestry and tradition, it was lofty self-sacrifice." The story is so, so, so racist. So racist, you guys. The rest of the book is fine, but if I were you, I would just close it as soon as you see the title of this story. It's horrendously offensive and has no redeeming characteristics. (Also, you know what we call that kind of "atrocious mixture" down here? AMERICAN. Sheesh. I don't even know what my heritage is.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    Like the first volume, this is a collection of short stories set in Avonlea and the surrounding area. Readers of the Anne of Green Gables series will notice many familiar names and places. I have to say that I really preferred the first volume over this one. Many of the stories in this one seemed darker in tone than is normal for L. M. Montgomery, and the racism in the last story was very disappointing, although not unusual in her time unfortunately. I enjoyed stories 1,2, 3, and 6 the most (Aun Like the first volume, this is a collection of short stories set in Avonlea and the surrounding area. Readers of the Anne of Green Gables series will notice many familiar names and places. I have to say that I really preferred the first volume over this one. Many of the stories in this one seemed darker in tone than is normal for L. M. Montgomery, and the racism in the last story was very disappointing, although not unusual in her time unfortunately. I enjoyed stories 1,2, 3, and 6 the most (Aunt Cynthia's Persian Cat, The Materializing of Cecil, Her Father's Daughter, and The Brother Who Failed, respectively). I read that these were stories that were originally rejected for the first volume and were subsequently published without Ms. Montgomery's permission. If this is true, it would make sense, since they wouldn't be expected to be her best work. Probably worth reading for L. M. Montgomery fans, but not essential.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    The worst things about this book, in ascending order of offensiveness: 1. There is a story told by Anne, in first person. You should NEVER do this. Also, it lacked any of the sparkle that such a visit to her interior would necessitate. 2. There is a story where a dude takes over the education of his dead best friend's daughter, age 10, and then falls in love with her and marries her when she's 18. 3. The last story, "Tannis of the Flats," is so racist toward People of the First Nations (and, more s The worst things about this book, in ascending order of offensiveness: 1. There is a story told by Anne, in first person. You should NEVER do this. Also, it lacked any of the sparkle that such a visit to her interior would necessitate. 2. There is a story where a dude takes over the education of his dead best friend's daughter, age 10, and then falls in love with her and marries her when she's 18. 3. The last story, "Tannis of the Flats," is so racist toward People of the First Nations (and, more specifically, people whose ancestry is partially First Nations and partially European) that it was almost unbelievable, like a parody of outdated and offensive beliefs about traits inherent to different ethnic groups.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ren (A Bookish Balance)

    While this had more variety than Chronicles of Avonlea, about half the stories were hit and miss and the other half were average. my favourites of the Avonlea short stories definitely come from this volume, but so do my least favourites.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Oh my do I have opinions on this short story collection. Some of the stories were very sweet, and fun to read. "Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat" was fun and silly; "The Materializing of Cecil" was probably my favorite of the bunch. Most of the stories were fine. But two in particular did not age well. "Tannis of the Flats," the final story in the collection, is terribly racist. Lots of gross references to "half-breeds" and honestly the whole premise to that story is stupid. I'd recommend skipping it. Oh my do I have opinions on this short story collection. Some of the stories were very sweet, and fun to read. "Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat" was fun and silly; "The Materializing of Cecil" was probably my favorite of the bunch. Most of the stories were fine. But two in particular did not age well. "Tannis of the Flats," the final story in the collection, is terribly racist. Lots of gross references to "half-breeds" and honestly the whole premise to that story is stupid. I'd recommend skipping it. Some gross quotes from the story, if you'd like further convincing: "Religions might mingle, but the different bloods--ah, it was not the right thing!" "There is no worse enemy in all the world than a half-breed. Your true Indian is bad enough, but his diluted descendant is ten times worse." "... hurled at him as they were by a woman trembling with all the passions of her savage ancestry." And then Tannis herself, dropping truth bombs: "'What difference does it make about me--a half-breed girl? We breed girls are only born to amuse the white men. That is so--is it not? Then, when they are tired of us, they push us aside and go back to their own kind." "The Education of Betty" was also not great. Reminded me of the relationship of Dean and Emily from the Emily Starr books. And this is where I sigh, because I know pre-teen and teenage me would not have had an issue with that premise. But now as an adult it seems horribly squicky-- particularly because of the emphasis the narrator places on grooming Betty to be the "perfect" woman.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    Ah! A delightful montage of shorts from the same Canadian author who brought us Anne of Green Gables. To recognize a few of my new favorites... The Materializing of Cecil On her birthday, Miss Charlotte, now 40, decides to make a change in her life. One that involves telling a falsehood -- that she indeed did have a beau at one time. And then -- the lie comes to life. The Dream-Child How a grieving woman who lost her infant son replaces him with a strange little boy that appears out of the ocean one Ah! A delightful montage of shorts from the same Canadian author who brought us Anne of Green Gables. To recognize a few of my new favorites... The Materializing of Cecil On her birthday, Miss Charlotte, now 40, decides to make a change in her life. One that involves telling a falsehood -- that she indeed did have a beau at one time. And then -- the lie comes to life. The Dream-Child How a grieving woman who lost her infant son replaces him with a strange little boy that appears out of the ocean one day. A touching story. The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily Revisit Anne and Diana again! Young Anne Shirley's imagination captivates the reader with the precious bundle that old Miss Emily leaves behind upon her death... The Son of His Mother Thyra Carewe intends to always keep her son's love, and strictly believes no other woman will ever enter his life to direct his thoughts away -- except one day "she" appears. What will the tragic consequences be? I certainly enjoyed some new favorites from L.M. Montgomery. She charms her way through each of her writings. And I loved getting to meet familiar faces again such as Marilla and Mrs. Rachel Lynde of Avonlea. The table of contents: Aunt Cynthia's Persian Cat The Materializing of Cecil Her Father's Daughter Jane's Baby The Dream-Child The Brother Who Failed The Return of Hester The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily Sara's Way The Son of His Mother The Education of Betty In Her Selfless Mood The Conscience Case of David Bell Only a Common Fellow Tannis of the Flats "Her poor father, now--he always said that a woman who liked books better than beaux was an unnatural creature." -L.M. Mongomery (The Education of Betty)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I solidly recommend that anyone who wants to read these try them on audio. I got listened to both Avonlea books through OverDrive, and they were such pleasant listening (as is anything L.M. Montgomery, really). Her beautiful writing translates so well to the format, and the narrators are usually easy to listen to. I DID listen on 1.25x speed, because the reader was rather slow. Such sweet stories, but I think my favorites are "Her Father's Daughter", and "The Dream Child". The former is such a s I solidly recommend that anyone who wants to read these try them on audio. I got listened to both Avonlea books through OverDrive, and they were such pleasant listening (as is anything L.M. Montgomery, really). Her beautiful writing translates so well to the format, and the narrators are usually easy to listen to. I DID listen on 1.25x speed, because the reader was rather slow. Such sweet stories, but I think my favorites are "Her Father's Daughter", and "The Dream Child". The former is such a sweet telling of really how important parents are to their children, and how love will cause people to do the most stubborn things. I loved it. "The Dream Child" began as a hauntingly, tragically beautiful tale, that I feel sure would have sent a "thrill" up the spine of a young Anne Shirley. Shiveringly delightful.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Minks

    Chronicles of Avonlea is one of my favorite books so I was excited to read this one. On the whole there were better stories in the first book, but I liked these too. I enjoyed them all except for "The Return of Hester" which basically had a ghost in it. I didn't like that. "In Her Selfless Mood" was just not my type of story, and then the last one "Tannis of the Flats" I found disturbing. I understand that at the time it was written many people had prejudices against Indians and mixed ethnicitie Chronicles of Avonlea is one of my favorite books so I was excited to read this one. On the whole there were better stories in the first book, but I liked these too. I enjoyed them all except for "The Return of Hester" which basically had a ghost in it. I didn't like that. "In Her Selfless Mood" was just not my type of story, and then the last one "Tannis of the Flats" I found disturbing. I understand that at the time it was written many people had prejudices against Indians and mixed ethnicities but I was still shocked at some of the horrible things said by the author in her descriptions. I don't believe she was trying to be mean but that almost makes it worse because she actually believed them to be inferior. It made me feel awful inside. Because of those I took off a star, but the rest of the stories I liked very much.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tmny

    A breezy read, which I enjoyed far more than the previous Chronicles edition. The stories are more varied, there are less old maids getting married, and Montgomery's descriptives are at their finest. The last story, Tannis of the Flats, veers away from Avonlea life to the West and gives us a very real insight into the attitudes of people of the time towards the natives. I found it very interesting that Montgomery casually uses startling racial slurs- "half breed"-, and stereotypes in the same br A breezy read, which I enjoyed far more than the previous Chronicles edition. The stories are more varied, there are less old maids getting married, and Montgomery's descriptives are at their finest. The last story, Tannis of the Flats, veers away from Avonlea life to the West and gives us a very real insight into the attitudes of people of the time towards the natives. I found it very interesting that Montgomery casually uses startling racial slurs- "half breed"-, and stereotypes in the same breath as a description of the wild moors; telling of the times.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jannah (Cloud Child)

    3.5/5 Overall a decent collection of stories, some very charming but with a weaker last half. My favourite story has to be "The Brother Who Failed", beautiful and heart warming. "The materialising of Cecil" and "The education of Betty" came second in favourites. "In her selfless mood" was the most bloody depressing. "The son of his mother" was just ridiculous and creepy. "Tannis of the Flats", the last story was just unreadable, the constant racist bile towards Native Canadians -_- sickening to re 3.5/5 Overall a decent collection of stories, some very charming but with a weaker last half. My favourite story has to be "The Brother Who Failed", beautiful and heart warming. "The materialising of Cecil" and "The education of Betty" came second in favourites. "In her selfless mood" was the most bloody depressing. "The son of his mother" was just ridiculous and creepy. "Tannis of the Flats", the last story was just unreadable, the constant racist bile towards Native Canadians -_- sickening to read. Overall, barring the last few, the collection is a comforting read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Francie

    Sweet, sad and funny stories. Some were really good, but "Tannis of the Flats" was horrible and racist and "In her selfless Mood" wasn't satisfying at all.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sanja_Sanjalica

    Some stories were a bit too racist even for that time, but in general, most of the stories transported me to a different world, it was like a picnic in the countryside. We all sometimes need that.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laurence R.

    I love LMM so, so, so much.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gehayi

    WARNING: SPOILERS FOLLOW. 1) Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat: Aunt Cynthia is one of those people who insists that everyone MUST love the kind of animal they themselves are fond of, so it's no surprise when she, about to go on vacation, drops off her Persian cat with her two nieces, who have no love of cats whatsoever. Not only that, the cat then disappears. Kind of a cute story, but I felt that I'd seen it on a billion sitcoms. 3 stars. 2) The Materializing of Cecil: An old maid, fed up with being moc WARNING: SPOILERS FOLLOW. 1) Aunt Cynthia’s Persian Cat: Aunt Cynthia is one of those people who insists that everyone MUST love the kind of animal they themselves are fond of, so it's no surprise when she, about to go on vacation, drops off her Persian cat with her two nieces, who have no love of cats whatsoever. Not only that, the cat then disappears. Kind of a cute story, but I felt that I'd seen it on a billion sitcoms. 3 stars. 2) The Materializing of Cecil: An old maid, fed up with being mocked and pitied for being single, makes up a story about having once been engaged to a lawyer named Cecil Fenwick of Blakely, New Brunswick--only to have an actual lawyer named Cecil Fenwick from Blakely, New Brunswick appear a few months later. Fortunately, Cecil has a sense of humor; just as fortunately, the two hit it off well. Implausible, but cute. 4 stars. 3) Her Father's Daughter: A young woman wants to have the father that she's only met once come to her wedding. I couldn't relate to this one at ALL. I couldn't figure out why a man that Sara barely knew was of any importance to her, much less why she was so determined to have him at her wedding that she swore she'd call off the marriage if he couldn't be there. And of course everything ends in a rather treacly manner, with Sara's mother and father reuniting after a couple of decades as if nothing had happened. Riiiiight. Far too silly, sentimental and unrealistic to suit me. 1 star. 4) Jane’s Baby: Two sisters, one a spinster, one a widow, battle over who gets to take care of Camilla Jane (as the spinster calls her) or Barbara Jane (as the widow calls her). Camilla/Barbara is the baby daughter of a dead friend, and each woman is determined that the child will be hers and hers alone. The widow eventually breaks into her sister's house and kidnaps the baby, yet for some reason the spinster doesn't call the law down on her for this. (If someone kidnapped MY child, I'd call the cops, whether the kidnapper was a relative or not.) The baby's illness and the spinster's skill at healing end up convincing the widow that they should raise the child together, which I guess is supposed to be a happy ending. Montgomery doesn't explain how the spinster is supposed to trust her sister again after the kidnapping, and both characters are rather annoying. 1.5 stars. 5) The Dream-Child: This is one of the few told by a male character in this collection. The wife of the narrator was very happy until they lost their firstborn son. Then she has a nervous breakdown, suffering extremely vivid dreams in which she hears him wailing somewhere near the sea (where she and her husband live). The dreams drive her to believe that her dead son is in danger and that she has to save him. One night she and her husband find an abandoned baby sitting in a water-filled dory floating near the shore, and the wife instantly believes that the sea and her dead son sent her this child to care for. She gets to keep the kid (an orphan set adrift by his asshole guardian to starve or drown), but she honestly doesn't seem much more stable at the end of the story, even if she has stopped believing that her dead son is calling for her. Not a bad story, but I would have liked a lot more psychological horror and a lot less " Babies Make Everything Better !" 3 stars. 6) The Brother Who Failed: All of Robert's brothers and sisters are wildly successful, famous and/or rich, but he is not. This doesn't bother him until one day at a family reunion when he overhears his aunt and the local schoolteacher dissing him, calling him a complete failure. This devastates him. Fortunately, however, one of his sisters also overhears the comments and discusses matters with her siblings. Shortly thereafter, Robert's brothers and sisters start a conversation with Aunt Isabel (in Robert's presence) about the people to whom they owe the most. All of them agree that they owe their confidence and their wealth to Robert; one brother even owes him his life. Robert is delighted to hear that his life has made so much difference, and Aunt Isabel admits at the end that "There's a kind of failure that is the best kind of success." Not exciting, and it's all telling, not showing...but I still loved it. 4 stars. 7) The Return of Hester: Once again, a tyrannical sister uses her deathbed to coerce her surviving sib into promising never to marry the man she loves. This time, however, the dead sister realizes that she screwed up and reunites the two. I was glad that the two got together again, but the impact was considerably lessened by the frequency with which I'd seen Montgomery deal with this tired plotline. 3 stars. 8) The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily: In which Anne of Green Gables is left a locked chest that belonged to spinster Miss Emily after the older woman dies. Inside is a diary in which a few entries relate a love story that was cut short by the classism of the young man's mother. What really annoyed me was how readily Emily believed that Paul's mother was correct and that she would ruin Paul with her inferiority if they married. I wanted to reach into the Kindle and smack that vile old woman. So...points for arousing emotion. But, sadly, this was presented as a tragic romance with Emily doing the heroic thing by breaking up with her rich beau rather than a pointless breakup that should have been resolved by Emily kicking Paul's mother all the way to the Yukon. Not badly written, but it hasn't aged well. 3 stars. 9) Sara’s Way : Sara only starts liking something or someone once they are wounded, neglected, scorned by society, etc. Consequently, she has no interest in the local "model young man" when he's rich, but she finds him utterly wonderful when his brother gets swindled, leaving both of then on the brink of ruin. I didn't think that Sara's way was particularly praiseworthy; home is a terrible place to do social work. 2.5 stars. 10) The Son of His Mother: Thyra Carewe, a thoroughly unpleasant woman, is obsessed with her son, Chester. (This made it a bit uncomfortable for me, as "Chester" was the name of Montgomery's deeply flawed but much adored oldest son.) Like Teddy Kent's mother in the Emily series, Thyra can't bear the thought of her son loving or being loved by anyone but herself, and when Chester falls for a girl named Damaris, Thyra just about loses her mind, demanding that Chester break up with Damaris or she'll stay outside and freeze. Naturally, as people ALWAYS do in Montgomery's stories, Chester promises that he won't see Damaris again; also, as ALWAYS happens in her stories, he does not do the sensible thing and elope with Damaris (because screw promises made under duress, right?). No, Chester keeps his promise for months. Then one day Chester goes out to sea with a neighbor and a terrible storm hits. The wreckage of their boat is found, but of the two men there is no sign. Thyra and Damaris meet and bond over their mutual grief, and eventually Damaris moves in with the woman who once hated her. They are still living together when the inevitable happy ending arrives. (Of course there's a happy ending. There were no corpses.) Really, really melodramatic. I couldn't help wishing that I could put Thyra in touch with a therapist and a prescription for a mood stabilizer. 2 stars. 11) The Education of Betty: A Wife Husbandry story. It hit every one of my squicks. 2 stars. 12) In Her Selfless Mood: Another of those stories about a pointlessly cruel promise demanded by a dying parent. This particular promise obliges Eunice Carr, a disabled and disfigured little girl, to look after Christopher Holland, her half-brother, for the rest of her life. Christopher, naturally, grows up to be an ingrate who throws her out of the house when he marries, only to be nursed tenderly by her when he catches smallpox. After he dies, she expires as well--apparently she isn't capable of living if her brother is dead. VERY unpleasant story, and I wanted desperately to rescue Eunice from this miserable universe, her relatives, and that cruel promise. 3 stars. 13) The Conscience Case of David Bell: What a lot of fussing over why David Bell, an elder of the church, won't stand up at a revival meeting and be saved! (Wouldn't you think that an elder of the church already was?) As it turns out, he's been torturing himself over having once passed a counterfeit ten-dollar bill to the missions and then having repented and given a real ten to make up for it. Why this is bothering him at all, much less is a matter of great spiritual torment, is beyond me. A dull story with very little point. 2 stars. 14) Only a Common Fellow: Basically, this is the story from Victorian melodramas--villain holds a mortgage on the family farm but he'll tear it up if the daughter of the family will marry him, daughter agrees, presumed-dead hero shows up at the last minute--if the villain decided, "You know what? I don't want to marry a woman who's in love with someone else. And I'll tear up the mortgage."It doesn't make much sense that a man who would blackmail a woman into marriage would do this, but it's still an entertaining twist. 3.5 stars. 15) Tannis of the Flats: This story is very racist, and I did not like it one bit because of this. Here are some of the lines that jumped out at me: "There are standpoints from which Indians are interesting, but they cannot be said to offer congenial social attractions." "...even the malicious and inveterate gossip of skulking breeds and Indians, squatting over teepee fires, could not hint at anything questionable in the relations between [Mrs. Joe] and Carey." "France, too, was responsible for somewhat in Tannis. It gave her a light step in place of the stealthy half-breed shuffle..." "There is no worse enemy in all the world than a half-breed. Your true Indian is bad enough, but his diluted descendant is ten times worse." Over and over, Montgomery states that Tannis is inferior because she is of mixed blood rather than white and offers back-handed compliments, saying that what in a white woman would be "merely commendable" (fetching a romantic rival so that she could say goodbye to their mutual beloved before his death ) was, for a woman of Tannis's ancestry and upbringing, "lofty self-sacrifice."At no time do any characters realize that such comments are neither kind nor true--and they are anything but necessary to a writer telling a romance between a white man and a First Nations woman. 0 stars. Overall--37.5 stars. Divided by 15, that's 2.5 stars. And I feel that's a fair rating.

  23. 4 out of 5

    I'd So Rather Be Reading {Nat}

    Short stories are not my thing, and I don't know why I keep reading them, but I do. I think I'm trying to find a collection of short stories that I love as much as David Sedaris' work. But, I don't think that I'll ever love any anthology of short stories like I will a David Sedaris book so I need to stop trying. With all that said, I read Chronicles of Avonlea because it came as part of the Anne of Green Gables series I purchased for Nook, and because I just wasn't ready to leave the Avonlea worl Short stories are not my thing, and I don't know why I keep reading them, but I do. I think I'm trying to find a collection of short stories that I love as much as David Sedaris' work. But, I don't think that I'll ever love any anthology of short stories like I will a David Sedaris book so I need to stop trying. With all that said, I read Chronicles of Avonlea because it came as part of the Anne of Green Gables series I purchased for Nook, and because I just wasn't ready to leave the Avonlea world yet. I was disappointed that Anne and Gilbert weren't featured at all here, but enjoyed the book nonetheless. My usual complaint of short stories leaving me unsatisfied still applied, but this book was good for what it is: a sweet collection of stories that I forgot as soon as I read the last page. Up until the last story, Further Chronicles of Avonlea was more of the same, except for a story featuring Anne, which I was pleased to read. However, the last story was so different from the rest that I was shocked! It was racist and the tone was so unlike the rest of the Avonlea stories that I wondered at its inclusion in the series. The last story was not how I wanted to end my Anne of Green Gables journey and it soured the entire Further Chronicles of Avonlea experience for me. I would recommend these two books for fans of the Anne of Green Gables series only. If you're new to the Anne books, start with Anne of Green Gables. While I did enjoy these books, I don't think that they are enough to win over new-to-the-series readers. Just One Gripe: The last story in Further Chronicles of Avonlea was terrible! The Best Thing About This Book: Just about every story had its own little happily ever after. Appropriate for a younger audience: Yes Score: Characters: 3/5 Plot: 2/5 Setting/Imagery: 5/5 Originality: 3/5 Ending: 3/5 Total Score: 16/25

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    It hurts my heart to write this review. Truly, the Anne books and Emily of New Moon are some of my favorite books, and I adored L.M. Montgomery because of them. I could excuse all the other stories in the book, even if I found them trite and overly dramatic, and really overplaying the unhealthy parent/child relationships. I hated the story “The Education of Betty”, in which a grown man falls in love with the young woman he helped raise because ugh. But I even could have gotten past that one. But It hurts my heart to write this review. Truly, the Anne books and Emily of New Moon are some of my favorite books, and I adored L.M. Montgomery because of them. I could excuse all the other stories in the book, even if I found them trite and overly dramatic, and really overplaying the unhealthy parent/child relationships. I hated the story “The Education of Betty”, in which a grown man falls in love with the young woman he helped raise because ugh. But I even could have gotten past that one. But then came the last story in the book - “Tannis of the Flats”, a horribly racist, offensive piece of garbage. Tannis is described as a “half-breed” and “savage” and every flaw in her personality is attributed to her race. It is disgusting, and if anyone even tries to tell me that it was a “product of the times”, I will argue with you until my last breath that there has never been an excuse for racism, and that there have always been people who have understood that. Obviously, L.M. Montgomery wasn’t one of them.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elinor Loredan

    This collection is definitely not on par with the first volume, but it's still worth reading and has some really nice stories. The ones I like best are Jane's Baby, The Brother Who Failed, The Return of Hester, The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily, and The Education of Betty. Some of them are downright morbid, depressing, and empty of beauty, like In Her Selfless Mood. A recurring theme in this book is long-term, stringent self-sacrifice, and the tone reminds me somewhat of The Doctor's Sweethear This collection is definitely not on par with the first volume, but it's still worth reading and has some really nice stories. The ones I like best are Jane's Baby, The Brother Who Failed, The Return of Hester, The Little Brown Book of Miss Emily, and The Education of Betty. Some of them are downright morbid, depressing, and empty of beauty, like In Her Selfless Mood. A recurring theme in this book is long-term, stringent self-sacrifice, and the tone reminds me somewhat of The Doctor's Sweetheart. True, Tannis of the Flats is abominable, but at the same time I can relate to Tannis, since I don't look at relationships casually. I like them to really mean something and am turned off by 'flirtations.' Overall, I don't love this collection, but I have to say that the range of human emotions, desires, faults, virtues that LMM depicts is incredibly varied. She doesn't seem to miss a single one in her work. All the gushing on the back cover is amusing-'wonderful adventures...warm and exciting, delightful tales to cherish, a book you'll never want to end.'

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

    I found this collection of stories very much the same as her past work and not as involving. They all seemed to be versions of things I had read before. I can't remember what I thought when I first encountered them as a child. One thing that did stick out is the attitudes of the time, particularly to other nationalities e.g. the French and Syrians are treated in a condescending and dismissive way. This hit me most strongly in the last story when Montgomery goes on at length about "Indians" and "B I found this collection of stories very much the same as her past work and not as involving. They all seemed to be versions of things I had read before. I can't remember what I thought when I first encountered them as a child. One thing that did stick out is the attitudes of the time, particularly to other nationalities e.g. the French and Syrians are treated in a condescending and dismissive way. This hit me most strongly in the last story when Montgomery goes on at length about "Indians" and "Breeds". She's reflecting the attitudes of her time but it is still jarring.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Isblue

    This is my first read of this book as an adult and it is not a good or particularly enjoyable collection of stories. The final story is so horribly racist I couldn't finish it. There had been earlier indications of racism in other Montgomery books (Rainbow Valley had one that disappointed me in the author) but I laid it down to the times. Tannis of the Flats managed to surpass that entirely. If one wanted a work of fiction that indicated how white Canadians of the time felt about the First Natio This is my first read of this book as an adult and it is not a good or particularly enjoyable collection of stories. The final story is so horribly racist I couldn't finish it. There had been earlier indications of racism in other Montgomery books (Rainbow Valley had one that disappointed me in the author) but I laid it down to the times. Tannis of the Flats managed to surpass that entirely. If one wanted a work of fiction that indicated how white Canadians of the time felt about the First Nations people, that one story would indicate it very clearly.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Pretty standard LMM short stories as you go along, and then there's the last one, Tannis of the Flats. It is so horrifyingly racist. There are racist comments in some of her other books, but I was always able to look at those as a sign of the times kind of thing. But this story... Ugh. I was barely able to finish reading it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    I am surprised that I did not like this volume nearly as well as Chronicles of Avonlea. The lost love from a "bitter quarrel" and recovered in old age paradigm was overused, and some of the stories ended very abruptly. The book was quite dark. Rather than wanting to eat it up, like all other LM Montgomery I've read, I just kind of wanted it to be over.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    As always L.M. Montgomery never disappoints! l enjoyed the short stories from this book. Each chronicle had a life lesson, and most of the themes include karma and justice. L.M. Montgomery does an excellent job at writing "feel good" stories. This book, as well as all of her books, still remain classics for me and are enjoyable at any age!

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