Hot Best Seller

Poetry of the Romantics

Availability: Ready to download

This anthology of romantic poetry contains poems on the subjects of the human spirit, time, love, art and beauty. It includes work by William Blake, John Clare, John Keats and William Wordsworth.


Compare

This anthology of romantic poetry contains poems on the subjects of the human spirit, time, love, art and beauty. It includes work by William Blake, John Clare, John Keats and William Wordsworth.

30 review for Poetry of the Romantics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A great little book containing the most canonical poetry of the Romantics. They are all here; Shelley, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Byron, Clare et al. These famous poets, whom became known as the Romantic poets, deal with sensitivity, nature, politics, really introducing you into why they were known as the Romantics. Its great for occasionally browsing through, and I actually found this little book a source of great inspiration with my own poetry. There is something beautiful about these colle A great little book containing the most canonical poetry of the Romantics. They are all here; Shelley, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Byron, Clare et al. These famous poets, whom became known as the Romantic poets, deal with sensitivity, nature, politics, really introducing you into why they were known as the Romantics. Its great for occasionally browsing through, and I actually found this little book a source of great inspiration with my own poetry. There is something beautiful about these collection of poems, and I found the poems from John Clare, Shelley, Keats etc the better ones. These poets were deeply tuned into nature and are amazingly descriptive. Great little book. A great introduction into Romanticism.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    Leafing through the poems when the mood takes me. Update: I really enjoyed this book as a sideliner to the novel I'm reading as I could dip in and out of it. There are some poems in it that I really enjoyed and others I wasn't so keen on but it does give a variety of poets; this was my first real look at Shelley, Wordsworth and Byron. I would have expected Ode by Arthur O'Shaughnessy to be in this book but I suppose the poem was romantic but he wasn't really considered that way. I'd r Leafing through the poems when the mood takes me. Update: I really enjoyed this book as a sideliner to the novel I'm reading as I could dip in and out of it. There are some poems in it that I really enjoyed and others I wasn't so keen on but it does give a variety of poets; this was my first real look at Shelley, Wordsworth and Byron. I would have expected Ode by Arthur O'Shaughnessy to be in this book but I suppose the poem was romantic but he wasn't really considered that way. I'd really like to own a copy of this book someday, and I wrote a list of the poems I liked somewhere so I'll edit when I find it. Poems I can remember appreciating were 'I am' by John Clare - so mournful and yet hopeful too, and I just like the first line, "I am; yet what I am none cares or knows." That and The Painted Veil were good ones. Other poems made such use of personification, like The Mask of Anarchy and I did like that. The book ends with The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. It may be long but ah, it's epic. I just feel happier owning this book, whether I read through it regularly or not!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie Mcsweeney

    As someone who isn't normally into poetry I absolutely adore this little volume!I docked a star for the abundance of John Clare in it as he just doesn't tickle my pickle! It introduced me to Romanticism. Cannot recommend it highly enough!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anka Räubertochter

    I didn't enjoy Percy Shelley's poems at all but loved William Blake's poems. The rest was okay.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zanna

    I quite like Shelley sometimes; Coleridge has some good lines, and I suppose you can't hate too much on Blake, but I yawn and cringe through all this pastoral yearning for a golden age.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karim Anani

    Modern life can be so noisy it's easy to forget to stop and sometimes take it in. I fell into that trap: I was rushing out a couple of days ago when something unusual caught my eye: a bird, hopping on a stone wall, the air around adrift with white blossoms. I had to stop and take it in, then began noticing a few other things: the quiet of that morning, the thick fog crowning the mountains around me, the deep green pastures around me. Spring had come early to Firenze, and I had been to Modern life can be so noisy it's easy to forget to stop and sometimes take it in. I fell into that trap: I was rushing out a couple of days ago when something unusual caught my eye: a bird, hopping on a stone wall, the air around adrift with white blossoms. I had to stop and take it in, then began noticing a few other things: the quiet of that morning, the thick fog crowning the mountains around me, the deep green pastures around me. Spring had come early to Firenze, and I had been too in my head to notice. It brought to mind a starkly different, starkly beautiful poem from a different lifetime: A widow bird sate mourning for her love... In that lifetime, I'd have been considered a Romantic; the aesthetics, outlook, and sensibility of Romanticism appealed to me, and the world was constantly beautiful. My literary education had never been formalised—school scrapped French and literature, the only two classes I'd been looking forward to, on my year—but Romanticism I knew; Poetry of the Romantics was almost like fate, a slim volume my finger passed over in a drab, grey bookshelf loaded with secondhand management and calculus textbooks, only stopping at it because it held a hint of colour. Reading it at home, I saw it was radiant. Now, Romanticism isn't a movement bursting with self-awareness; the Romantics were, if anything, a very, uh, sensitive lot. It's kind of hard to love it all unabashedly, but it's also hard not to love the unabashadness. Sure, some of the poems aren't good, veering towards the twee, and I knew that even then. "The Sick Rose" is almost a self-parody. But they were important, I think, for their technique as well as their outlook, and in wake of remembering their importance, I started thinking of their poems. I suspected I'd like them but roll my eyes at them. Maybe I've read too much McSweeney's. Maybe I'm hopelessly detached: I've become quite cynical, despite my efforts. I almost didn't stop. Yet stop I did. It brought the poem to mind, and then the book. It's worth thinking over what kind of priorities I've created for myself, and the few early morning stragglers I saw around me were contemplating their phones. I had subconsciously reached for mine to take a picture. But I stopped. I took it in. And slowly, as clear as sunlight, the rest of the poem came back: A widow bird sate mourning for her love Upon a wintry bough. The frozen wind crept on above, The freezing stream below. There was no leaf upon the forest bare, No flower upon the ground. And little motion in the air Except the mill-wheel's sound. Another memory, unbeckoned, came back: my then-girlfriend, reading the same poem the next day, putting the book down and saying, "Wow, you can totally see it." I've been rereading some of the poems sporadically since, and I wasn't wrong; while sometimes rolling my eyes, I've been loving their unrestrained love, technique, and imagery.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Perttu Saraniva

    Little bit old language, difficult to understand at some point. But wonderful rhymes.

  8. 4 out of 5

    QueenBee

    The book is filled with plenty of meaningful poems that give an insight to many aspects which I enjoyed contemplating. Every poem is different and I quite enjoyed most. What let me down was the fact that most of the same poets were seen a lot and there could’ve been more variety, especially at the start as the same poet was used for ages and I was anticipating a change in poet. Overall I did enjoy the book and there is a use of many good poets.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liana Ashley

    Romantic poetry is always enjoyable, although this collection has NO female poets. WTF?! At least I have my other collections.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Zvonchica

  11. 4 out of 5

    Yosra

  12. 4 out of 5

    Faith

  13. 4 out of 5

    HorstAdler

  14. 5 out of 5

    Timothy John

  15. 5 out of 5

    Craig_thompson Thompson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  17. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Bhatnagar

  18. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chiara

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tijana

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sissi

  22. 5 out of 5

    Harriet Thacker

  23. 4 out of 5

    Inna

  24. 4 out of 5

    Becky

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hanin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena Todorinska

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul Gibbons

  30. 5 out of 5

    Belle Thompson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.