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The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths by Padraic Colum ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are curre The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths by Padraic Colum ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. **********************************************************


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The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths by Padraic Colum ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are curre The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths by Padraic Colum ********************************************************** We are pleased to offer thousands of books for the Kindle, including thousands of hard-to-find literature and classic fiction books. Click on our Editor Name (eBook-Ventures) next to the book title above to view all of the titles that are currently available. **********************************************************

30 review for The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    Neither my favorite version of Norse Mythology nor my favorite of Colum's books, but a decent introduction to the major tropes and stories of the mythos for readers with slight familiarity with the topic (for absolute beginners the groundwork may be inadequate). Some stories were told oddly out of chronological order so that a character might be mentioned in one chapter but then born in a later chapter, or an adventure begun and then the telling interrupted and finished later. This may be due to an attem Neither my favorite version of Norse Mythology nor my favorite of Colum's books, but a decent introduction to the major tropes and stories of the mythos for readers with slight familiarity with the topic (for absolute beginners the groundwork may be inadequate). Some stories were told oddly out of chronological order so that a character might be mentioned in one chapter but then born in a later chapter, or an adventure begun and then the telling interrupted and finished later. This may be due to an attempt to incorporate more than one strand of legend, as the versions differ somewhat regionally. The text is somewhat coy about sexual matters -- lovers spend several days alone "talking" -- but amusingly Willy Pogany's illustrations are slightly less so, revealing the occasional gratuitous bare breast. Norse ladies are very stoic about the cold, I guess. I'm not sure why my edition was reissued with a cover by Melanie Parks with an iguana-looking thing on it. Pogany's illustrations look like this: Heimdall telling stories to Hnoss

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jan Rice

    Formative first book of Norse mythology The edition shown is by the same publisher as my copy, but it was published in 1962. My copy has my mother's name in the cover, with the date "Sept. 1930," when she was ten years old. Published 1920, reissued 1929. Illustrated by Willy Pogany August 19, 2017: Now showing the 1920 edition that I have. I didn't realize I'd added this one; was looking at this book since I just co Formative first book of Norse mythology The edition shown is by the same publisher as my copy, but it was published in 1962. My copy has my mother's name in the cover, with the date "Sept. 1930," when she was ten years old. Published 1920, reissued 1929. Illustrated by Willy Pogany August 19, 2017: Now showing the 1920 edition that I have. I didn't realize I'd added this one; was looking at this book since I just completed Neil Gaiman's recent one on the subject.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeannette

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed this book,and ended up taking quite a few notes, but when it came down to it, I am not sure that I quite liked how this book was organized. The myths were fascinating, but I feel there may have been a way to arrange them that would make everything easier to follow. That being said, there's a lot to consider in this collection. Some things I jotted down as interesting: I found Loki's role as the god of mischief turned evil fascinating. He started out neutrally trou I enjoyed this book,and ended up taking quite a few notes, but when it came down to it, I am not sure that I quite liked how this book was organized. The myths were fascinating, but I feel there may have been a way to arrange them that would make everything easier to follow. That being said, there's a lot to consider in this collection. Some things I jotted down as interesting: I found Loki's role as the god of mischief turned evil fascinating. He started out neutrally troublesome and become something much more sinister. Super thought-provoking. I loved the parallels I caught between the myths and stories we tell today; for example, the story of Brynhild and the similarity of fairy tales like Sleeping Beauty and Snow White (at least, until you get to the tragic Romeo and Juliet part). I even caught a little Arthurian thread in there (Sword in a tree, anyone?). It was also awesome being able to trace some Tolkien imagery to ideas found in these myths. Never having read some of these stories, I didn't realize how heavily Tolkien had borrowed some of his ideas (A cursed ring? A treasure that turns a man into a dark creature? Where have I been?). Other things weren't so much parallels as things I found interesting to ponder. For example, when Odin and Frigga wager on who is more kingly, and you can see the competition between wisdom and strength taking place in the myth. Wisdom wins, and yet, bravery is supremely important as shown in the story of the Valkyries, and Brynhild and Sigur. You can also contemplate the price of a life in the story of Loki and the Otter... and yet the gods send Valkyries train men to die and take their places in Odin's Ragnarok army. And okay, one last contradiction to ponder: Thor feels shamed when he dresses as Freya to fool the giants and Loki mocks him, and yet how many times does Loki borrow the falcon dress to change his shape? Speaking of the giants, isn't it fascinating how much power giants, dwarves, and witches have over the gods themselves? I found it so. I kind of wanted to know more about the gods just so I could understand that better. There's so much more I could write - I literally filled a page full of notes. I don't think I would be successful putting it coherently, though. I'm not sure THIS has been coherent. And while again, I didn't love the setup of this book, it definitely piqued enough interest that I will do some future research into Norse mythology. And I might work on my pronunciation of some of these Nordic names as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ed Ingman

    While on vacation in Wisconsin, we happened upon a horse farm that specialized in Scandinavian horses. On a whim, we stopped in and learned all about the Gotland, Icelandic, Arland, and other varieties of Scandinavian horses. We also met Icelandic goats, chickens, and ducks. At any rate, the sign of this place, called Norse Horse Park on Washington Island in Wisconsin, featured a picture of Odin riding Sleipnir, his horse. This reminded me of the Norse mythological poems that we read in German c While on vacation in Wisconsin, we happened upon a horse farm that specialized in Scandinavian horses. On a whim, we stopped in and learned all about the Gotland, Icelandic, Arland, and other varieties of Scandinavian horses. We also met Icelandic goats, chickens, and ducks. At any rate, the sign of this place, called Norse Horse Park on Washington Island in Wisconsin, featured a picture of Odin riding Sleipnir, his horse. This reminded me of the Norse mythological poems that we read in German class in high school. It was fascinating hearing those ancient stories then and that interest was rekindled. On our way back to the ferry at the end of the day, we stopped by a book store and I picked up this book. It is a selected series of stories that sort of weave the major mythological poems together ending in the Ragnorak (the war between the giants and the gods of Asgard). This was a fascinating read and I really appreciated having a chance to delve back into that world. It also provided an excellent tutorial for the movie, Thor. Not saying that the movie is accurate to the ancient tales, but I was able to explain certain aspects of the story to my wife as we watched the film. If you've read about the Greek and Roman gods, and liked learning about them, I would recommend jumping into Norse mythology. It's not as well known to most Americans but it's equally if not more interesting. They had/have truly interesting gods!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cwn_annwn_13

    Simplified watered down versions of stories from the Eddas. This book seems to be aimed at a late elementary or jr. high school age reader. For that target audience this is a great introduction and would probably be the best thing you could buy if you were trying to picque a young persons interest in the Norse "Myths". If your an adult there are several other books on this subject that I would recomend over this one though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Larissa

    This book, comprised of Irish author Padraic Colum's retellings of classic Norse myths, was on the shelf in our apartment when we moved in. Having only encountered Norse mythology in the wonderful illustrated D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths, I thought it would be a good idea for me to reacquaint myself with these stories, which are referenced not infrequently in Scandinavian and Icelandic literature. Colum's book is, as the cover claims, "very readable," although I found the choice to use a quasi-Old This book, comprised of Irish author Padraic Colum's retellings of classic Norse myths, was on the shelf in our apartment when we moved in. Having only encountered Norse mythology in the wonderful illustrated D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths, I thought it would be a good idea for me to reacquaint myself with these stories, which are referenced not infrequently in Scandinavian and Icelandic literature. Colum's book is, as the cover claims, "very readable," although I found the choice to use a quasi-Old English throughout a little unnecessary. (The typical 'thees' and 'thous' and such became a bit grating after awhile, and don't really add significant gravitas of the Gods, either.) The story chronology also overlaps and reverses and reorients a fair amount, often owing to the structure of the myths themselves more than anything. This isn't actually a problem, rather it creates a sort of timelessness--especially in the early stories which characterize each god individually--and a sense of the scope of each immortal being's independent body of lore. Thor, for instance, has a really extensive set of his own myths and stories, many of which are related in this volume. Rather than be told in a strictly linear fashion, however, these tales tend to overlap and reference one another without entirely accounting for what happened in what order. Overall, however, the organization of the myths into four sections--"The Dwellers in Asgard," "Odin the Wanderer," "The Witch's Heart," and "The Sword of the Volsungs and the Twilight of the Gods,"--creates a wonderful momentum and unity within stories which are, of course, linked, but were not perhaps originally told with such a coherent story arc in mind. As arranged here, the reader gets a clear sense of how simple acts have real resonance and lead to inevitable consequences, i.e. the barter of a sword for a wife, or the cruel, but seemingly innocuous act of killing an animal which leads to a compounding of events which eventually--literally-- bring on the end of the world. Fate (with a capital 'F') is as much an actor in these stories as any of the characters, and yet each of the Gods and people involved are shown ways to avoid their grim fates, are frequently told point blank what will befall them if they choose one action over another. But that's really what makes these stories so moving and sympathetic in the end--they resonate so frequently with the very human shortsightedness and/or romantic weaknesses which lead even the most powerful and wise of beings to bring about their own downfalls.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Carrabis

    The Children of Odin was a summer vacation read and well worth it. This is Padraic Colum's (an author) retelling of Norse myth and it seems much closer to the spirit and feel of the Eddas,et cetera, than Neil Gaiman's. Guess I don't go in for radical updates designed to suit the tastes of modern audiences. Give me epic epics, heroic heros and evil evil doers, Aye!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This is a great read. Being a Skandanavian I was especially interested in reading this book. This is nortic mythology at it's best. I recommend you all read it and enjoy and Be Blessed. Diamond

  9. 4 out of 5

    Filipe

    A good intro to Norse Mythology. Could have been better organised in terms of chronology, yet, quite an interesting and fun read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Sas

    Though a bit bowdlerized (as mentioned in the introduction) Colum’s retellings are lucid laced through with a poetic northern spirit. Definitely more evocative than Lancelyn-Green.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Jones

    The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths is exactly what the title says it is; a collection of several stories from Norse mythology. And, really, it's not that bad. I bought it at a train station because I needed something short and interesting to read. It fit those criteria, but little else. This book is in serious need of a character list, or a family tree, or something. I'd really liked to have seen ten or twenty pages dedicated to certain characters, either in the front of The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths is exactly what the title says it is; a collection of several stories from Norse mythology. And, really, it's not that bad. I bought it at a train station because I needed something short and interesting to read. It fit those criteria, but little else. This book is in serious need of a character list, or a family tree, or something. I'd really liked to have seen ten or twenty pages dedicated to certain characters, either in the front of back. Maybe a page-long description/picture/history of the major players or something. With the exception of the really big hitters (Odin, Thor, Loki), some of the names were kind of confusing (Frey, Freya, Frigg) or hard to pronounce (Svartalfheimr, Skidbladnir, Muspellsheimr) though, admittedly, these are hardly the author's fault. Every story is short and easily digestible, and gives you a good idea of what's going on in the Norse Pantheon. Those who want to learn more about the family of Odin should definitely give it a look - especially if, like me, you're a fan of Odin in particular (he gets several chapters entirely to himself). If you're a fan of Thor from the Avengers, though... you might be in for a bit of a surprise (SPOILER: Loki is not Thor's brother). Not a bad way to spent seven dollars or a few hours. But not the sort of book I'd be excited to sit down and spend an evening with.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena

    Why I liked it: -It's a clear narration of the Norse myths. I love anything norse, so this book was meant to be a favorite of mine. -It is neatly arranged into small chapters that focus on a certain event or a certain god/hero. -Gorgeous illustrations and chapter headings. -The language is easy to follow and has an old fairytale tone to it. Also, it's told in a linear way, except for the very first chapter, which starts from Ragnarök. -Even if you forget what a certain word is, th Why I liked it: -It's a clear narration of the Norse myths. I love anything norse, so this book was meant to be a favorite of mine. -It is neatly arranged into small chapters that focus on a certain event or a certain god/hero. -Gorgeous illustrations and chapter headings. -The language is easy to follow and has an old fairytale tone to it. Also, it's told in a linear way, except for the very first chapter, which starts from Ragnarök. -Even if you forget what a certain word is, the writer reminds you if it's a spear, a horse, a place, or anything else when it is mentioned again. -Fantastic list of suggested reading at the end. -I can see myself rereading it, since it's short and it's never boring. What I didn't like: -This is so edited to be accessible to children as well, that I can't help but wonder if some events were more disturbing than they are portrayed (Freya and the dwarves, for instance), or as innocent as they seemed to be (Odin talking with Gunnlöd) -Some things are left untold, such as Loki's fate, or what did happen to the gods after the final battle. Or how Frey returned to Asgard... -It needs a character list. -Baldur's doom :( All in all, great book. When I have children, this and The Hobbit will be their bedtime books :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Keegan

    Great myths, great mythology. Odin all-father attempts to create a harmonious world, but Loki, a trickster, a boarder-crosser, a half breed, introduces chaos, and the stories unfold. In exploit after exploit, Loki is dazzling to watch. Characters and themes emerge in cycles, with tensions growing greater with every gyre. Eventually, all the traps Loki laid in his life culminate in Ragnarok, the twilight of the Gods, and heaven and earth crumble. But what's this? Two greater worlds emerge. Perhap Great myths, great mythology. Odin all-father attempts to create a harmonious world, but Loki, a trickster, a boarder-crosser, a half breed, introduces chaos, and the stories unfold. In exploit after exploit, Loki is dazzling to watch. Characters and themes emerge in cycles, with tensions growing greater with every gyre. Eventually, all the traps Loki laid in his life culminate in Ragnarok, the twilight of the Gods, and heaven and earth crumble. But what's this? Two greater worlds emerge. Perhaps the trickster Loki was not a force of destruction after all. He identified the holes in the flawed system of his time, and stretched them to create a greater system, much like he knotted string together to create the first net, capturing everything with nothingness. I love that this mythology ends with a glimpse of the Garden of Eden. This stresses the metaphorical nature of myth, and in these myths, that stresses the productive power of our imagination – to be able to destroy and rebuild and create something slightly more dazzling every time. If anyone would like my full notes on these myths for research, feel free to contact me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Surprisingly entertaining. I didn't have high expectations, since the last book of myths/religious stories were so horrendous. The stories were actually remotely logical and even supported each other as small pieces to a larger, continuous story. Not sure if this latter aspect is actually a good or bad thing. I was hoping for little, standalone stories. But it was very interesting to find out some of the background and personality quirks on the famous Norse gods. I especially liked the ending, a Surprisingly entertaining. I didn't have high expectations, since the last book of myths/religious stories were so horrendous. The stories were actually remotely logical and even supported each other as small pieces to a larger, continuous story. Not sure if this latter aspect is actually a good or bad thing. I was hoping for little, standalone stories. But it was very interesting to find out some of the background and personality quirks on the famous Norse gods. I especially liked the ending, albeit a bit brief compared to the action it contained, and how it was so final, skipping the feel-good, pastures of daisies, riding off into the sunset kind of crap that modern stories feel obligated to put in just so they don't make anyone feel an emotion because they might do something crappy and then a lawyer would sue poor Padriac Colum and the book would be banned from all proper establishments.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    This book provides a rather coherent set of Norse myths. The author ties the myths together so that they flow a lot better than your average compilation of random stories (which is my general impression of most mythology books). The stories appear to have been selected to minimize contradiction. (As with any mythology, in Norse mythology there are many authors, resulting in inevitable confusion as they disagree over insignificant details like the names of the main characters.) They ar This book provides a rather coherent set of Norse myths. The author ties the myths together so that they flow a lot better than your average compilation of random stories (which is my general impression of most mythology books). The stories appear to have been selected to minimize contradiction. (As with any mythology, in Norse mythology there are many authors, resulting in inevitable confusion as they disagree over insignificant details like the names of the main characters.) They are also (well) chosen to present a chronological picture of the Norse gods and how they change. I was intrigued to learn that Norse gods, unlike those of many other mythologies (Greek, for example) actually change. Loki, in particular, changes dramatically through the stories. All in all, I was very impressed. The author does a fine job of presenting the myths in a readable way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I talked our school district into ordering this book for my Mythology class. I certainly haven't regretted it. We spend the second quarter of the semester class studying Norse mythology. This book is very accessible, even to the students who are dumped into the elective class just because there's nowhere else to put them. The myths are told in short story format, using simple but poetic language. Sure, the names throw the kids, but otherwise my high schoolers have no trouble with it. I talked our school district into ordering this book for my Mythology class. I certainly haven't regretted it. We spend the second quarter of the semester class studying Norse mythology. This book is very accessible, even to the students who are dumped into the elective class just because there's nowhere else to put them. The myths are told in short story format, using simple but poetic language. Sure, the names throw the kids, but otherwise my high schoolers have no trouble with it. They definitely are relieved to read this after nine weeks with Edith Hamilton's dry old Mythology book about the Greco-Roman gods! I highly recommend this book as a classroom text, or as just a very good primer on Norse mythology.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Colvin

    Delightful. Colum is a fine storyteller, using diction that provides just the right archaic, “northern” flavor. The myths included are fairly comprehensive and detailed. Highly recommended for homeschoolers; provides the best possible subject matter for progymnasmata writing exercises. The line drawings are beautiful. I wrote this review based on the ebook version (epub with illustrations) available free at project Gutenberg.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Sebesta

    Read this book to your children. Or find somebody reading it out loud on youtube and leave it on while you work. It's good for your kids. It'll teach 'em about dwarves. Technology has given us the ability to have the experience of an old guy sitting by the campfire telling crazy stories all day without any of the negatives. Yay technology!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Portia

    Colum wrote this version for all ages, so some imagination is required when reading the tales to appreciate the full effect. Still, it's quick and informative. I'll definitely refer to it in the future.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaz

    A great translation and coherent compilation of Norse myths for the average person or child. The myths weave seamlessly from one chapter to the next and present a wonderful overall picture of the Norse pantheon. I wouldn't be surprised if Tolkien read this to his children.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mordecai

    I was once reading this book on a plane. Looking out the window while thinking in the beautiful simple prose of Colum's recounting, I could easily imagine the Norse gods and heroes amongst the clouds.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth Bridges

    I'll be honest, I only read this because I'm a Loki fan. But it was immensely entertaining, and beautifully written. And yes, there was plenty of Loki in it, so if you're like me, it's a good book to read. ;)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I don't have a lot of experience reading mythological books like this, but I really enjoyed the way Colum wrote these. They've got a regal sort of "spaketh" tone to them, but the story isn't hard to follow. An excellent introduction to Norse Mythology.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brolie

    Plot holes! Uhg. But I love ^_^ "So then Loki was all like 'hey thor dur ber duuuurr' and then thor was all 'nuh uh!' and thor got bitch slapped." i may be atheist... wait yeah.. that's why im athiest.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Coleman

    Wonderful Loki is realy evil

  26. 5 out of 5

    Casualbutsmart

    Loki. I am him, and he is all me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zorin Muller

    Yet to be reviewed...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michelle E.

    An easy read, and very entertaining.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Blicht

    Reading Log #7- Myth Title The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths Author: Padraic Colum Illustrator William Pogany Genre: Fantassy, fiction Theme(s): Power, Gods and Goddeses Opening line/sentence Once there was another Sun and another Moon; a different Sun and a different Moon from the ones we see now. Brief Book Summary This mystical story begins explaining that gods and goddesses lived in the city of Asgard before humans were on Earth. These collections of myths Reading Log #7- Myth Title The Children of Odin: The Book of Northern Myths Author: Padraic Colum Illustrator William Pogany Genre: Fantassy, fiction Theme(s): Power, Gods and Goddeses Opening line/sentence Once there was another Sun and another Moon; a different Sun and a different Moon from the ones we see now. Brief Book Summary This mystical story begins explaining that gods and goddesses lived in the city of Asgard before humans were on Earth. These collections of myths show how powerful magic and wonders could be. There are 3 important characters throughout these collections. Odin All Father crossed the rainbow bridge to walk among men in Midgard. Also, Thor defended the city of Asgard with his hammer. Loki was getting in trouble with the other gods where the dragons and giants walked free. They all have a distinct role in the stories that are very different from one another. Professional Recommendation/Review #1 Judy Silverman (Children's Literature) I read this book for the first time when I was nine years old, and it became the standard by which I judged all books of mythology. Now, rereading it for the first time in nearly fifty years (my own children wouldn t touch it) I m thrilled all over again. It is pure poetry; to read it aloud is like singing. Of course some (most) of the names can be rather difficult to pronounce, so if a reader has any reading problem he/she may become discouraged quickly. In a classroom setting a clever teacher can let the students know that everyone will probably have trouble, and therefore everyone needs to keep his/her sense of humor alive. Begin, perhaps, by having the teacher or aide try to read names like Hnossa, Hreidmar, Svadilfare, or Ygdrassil, and get a good laugh from them. But by all means read some of the stories aloud. The book is organized to give a complete account of the Norse gods, from their creation, Far away and long ago to their destruction, Ragnarok, the Twilight of the Gods. The gods were very human; they wanted power, love, and gold, and they made terrible mistakes. The consequences of their mistakes were not lessened because they were gods--their magic swords or hammers, once bartered away, were lost, possibly forever. A god might love a giant maiden and be banished from Asgard, the celestial city. A goddess might crave a giantess s golden necklace, beg for it, and win it, but will get no joy from her possession. The pen-and-ink illustrations at the beginning of each chapter are fabulous. First published in 1928, the book has lost nothing. Highly recommended. Professional Recommendation/Review #2 David Bennett (Books for Keeps No. 82, Sept. 1993) Two for the heavierweight, serious end of the myth shelf, worth considering if you have pupils who want to research and dig below the surface, making their own connections and following through ideas. Padraic Colum's classic version of northern myths, The Children of Odin, first came out in 1920. The language is poetic and the descriptions authoritative and vivid, matched by Willy Pogeny's original, whispy line drawings. James Reeves' rendering of the Greek legends in Heroes and Monsters: Legends of Ancient Greece seems a bit didactic at the onset with an introductory lecture and a pronunciation guide. However, the stories make a good book for chasing up classical references. Response to Two Professional Reviews The first review made me appreciate The Children of Odin even more. If I read this review before I read the book I would be very excited to read the book based off this very positive feedback. I read the review after reading the book and it also gave me a new perspective on the book. Silverman said these collections of mythologies are very well written. It is pure poetry where some words might be difficult to pronounce, however, children are still able to read the story. I really liked the part where Silverman talks about if a child has a reading problem they can become discouraged if they don’t understand words throughout the story. However, a clever teacher will let students know that everyone has trouble and it is okay to not know every word. This was a great addition to the review because this is something I could do as a future teacher to help students. In addition, I thought the second review was good, but wasn’t as powerful as the first one. This is because it doesn’t really analyze the story and it compares to other books that I haven’t heard of prior. Evaluation of Literary Elements This classical myth by Column is great for young readers. I wouldn’t necessarily read the entire book to the class because it is lengthy and somewhat repetitive, but there are many literary elements that would be effective for children to see. For example, Colum uses humor many times when the characters are utilizing their power. In addition, there is a lot of dialogue within each collection. This makes the story overall easier to comprehend and gives readers a good visual of what is going on throughout the story. Especially for this myth dialogue is good because the concept of mystical powers and fairytales could be confusing to students because it isn’t realistic. However, the dialogue will give them a better idea of what Colum is intending in the collections. Consideration of Instructional Application I think this story should be implemented in a classroom setting. However, I think it should be in the upper elementary school level because there are many concepts in the story that could be somewhat challenging. The teacher could read a few of the myths within the story. There are black and white pictures throughout the fantasy’s. After the teacher reads a few of them the teacher will have the children all make a colored picture of anything that happened throughout the fantasy based off of the writing. They could make the picture similar to the pictures within the story, or they could change it up. To give this a colored component will make the students excited and want to be creative. The teacher will hang them up throughout the classroom and give out materials including construction paper, markers, glue, scissors, string, pom poms, and more.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I listened to the Librivox recording (by Elizabeth Klett) of this book during my workouts. Put simply, this is a wonderful summary of Nordic mythology and Colum's telling of it are woven into an almost prose poetry.

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