Hot Best Seller

The Holy Longing: The Search for a Christian Spirituality

Availability: Ready to download

Ronald Rolheiser makes sense of what is frequently a misunderstood word: spirituality. In posing the question "What is spirituality?" Father Rolheiser gets quickly to the heart of common difficulties with the subject, and shows through compelling anecdotes and personal examples how to channel that restlessness, that deep desire, into a healthy spirituality. This book is fo Ronald Rolheiser makes sense of what is frequently a misunderstood word: spirituality. In posing the question "What is spirituality?" Father Rolheiser gets quickly to the heart of common difficulties with the subject, and shows through compelling anecdotes and personal examples how to channel that restlessness, that deep desire, into a healthy spirituality. This book is for those searching to understand what Christian spirituality means and how to apply it to their own lives.Rolheiser explains the nonnegotiables--the importance of community worship, the imperatives surrounding social action, the centrality of the Incarnation, the sustenance of the spiritual life--and how spirituality necessarily impacts every aspect of human experience.At the core of this readable, deeply revealing book is an explanation of God and the Church in a world that more often than not doubts the credibility of both."


Compare

Ronald Rolheiser makes sense of what is frequently a misunderstood word: spirituality. In posing the question "What is spirituality?" Father Rolheiser gets quickly to the heart of common difficulties with the subject, and shows through compelling anecdotes and personal examples how to channel that restlessness, that deep desire, into a healthy spirituality. This book is fo Ronald Rolheiser makes sense of what is frequently a misunderstood word: spirituality. In posing the question "What is spirituality?" Father Rolheiser gets quickly to the heart of common difficulties with the subject, and shows through compelling anecdotes and personal examples how to channel that restlessness, that deep desire, into a healthy spirituality. This book is for those searching to understand what Christian spirituality means and how to apply it to their own lives.Rolheiser explains the nonnegotiables--the importance of community worship, the imperatives surrounding social action, the centrality of the Incarnation, the sustenance of the spiritual life--and how spirituality necessarily impacts every aspect of human experience.At the core of this readable, deeply revealing book is an explanation of God and the Church in a world that more often than not doubts the credibility of both."

30 review for The Holy Longing: The Search for a Christian Spirituality

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maria Elisabeth

    When it's good, it's very very good, and when it's bad, it's horrid. It's mostly good. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Clark

    This was a book recommended by a wise and thoughtful friend and it did not disappoint. I have used it for my morning devotionals and both the author's craft and content have been a rich source of delight and stimulation. I awarded this book five stars but a better measure might be the copious margin notes, underlining, and large number of colored reminder tags now peeking out from the text. Rolheiser writes from a Roman Catholic point of view but is remarkably open handed. This is not to suggest This was a book recommended by a wise and thoughtful friend and it did not disappoint. I have used it for my morning devotionals and both the author's craft and content have been a rich source of delight and stimulation. I awarded this book five stars but a better measure might be the copious margin notes, underlining, and large number of colored reminder tags now peeking out from the text. Rolheiser writes from a Roman Catholic point of view but is remarkably open handed. This is not to suggest the author does not advance a theological point of view. However, the author chooses to search for and occupy that ground common to all Christ followers. As a non-Roman Catholic, I found his critique of both Protestant and Catholic approaches to spiritual practice fair, open-handed, and quite helpful. A particularly notable feature of this book is Rolheiser's emphasis upon an ecclesiology centered Spiritual Practice. While others have suggested we need religion rather than spirituality--perhaps a glib caveat spurred by the our current hyper-individualistic culture--Rolheiser's book clearly suggests this push to choose between spirituality and religion is unnecessary--heretical even. A well written book, a book of practical help I will recommend to my students and friends, and a book of wisdom to which I shall return.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gary Cleveland

    Finished reading it today. One gem to share. "Spirituality is about what we do with the fire inside us....."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rosemarie

    This book had some great insights. Rolheiser begins by defining Spirituality in very broad terms and showing how everyone - religious or not - HAS a Spiritual side. There is a very interesting part where he compares three women: Mother Teresa, Princess Diana and Janis Joplin, showing how they may seem very different, but it really all comes down to how they dealt with their Spirituality. This part comes at the beginning and really got me into the book. He then focuses specifically on the componen This book had some great insights. Rolheiser begins by defining Spirituality in very broad terms and showing how everyone - religious or not - HAS a Spiritual side. There is a very interesting part where he compares three women: Mother Teresa, Princess Diana and Janis Joplin, showing how they may seem very different, but it really all comes down to how they dealt with their Spirituality. This part comes at the beginning and really got me into the book. He then focuses specifically on the components of a healthy Christian Spiritual life. He talks about the "non-negotiable" pillars of Christian Spirituality and makes some very good points as to why he considers them so. There is also a wonderful part where he talks about how a person can be happy or unhappy in ANY state or stage in life. If you think you are unhappy because you don't have something - you're wrong. Lots of people who have it are very unhappy - and lots of people who don't are very happy. It's about surrendering to the Spirit - allowing it to descend and give you the grace to live happily with any life situation. This was one of my favorite parts of the book because the idea was new to me - I'd never heard anyone put it quite the way this author does. Overall, I really enjoyed the book. Rolheiser is a very good writer. I had heard of him before but never had the chance to read any of his work. I had to read this book for a class, but now I'm just glad that I read it for myself, and would gladly read any of this other books. I'd recommend this one to anyone who would like a better understanding of what Spirituality is...and what it is not.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    An intelligently written book about Jesus and Christianity. I like this book because it offers up Christianity in a positive light, not commercialized, no hint of any social conservatism/right of center politics, and most importantly no littering of fundamentalist views. The Holy Longing speaks about spirituality in regards to Christianity instead of 'religion,' which is why I gave this book a change and I'm glad that I did. There is no phony Christian agenda evident, just a book about discoveri An intelligently written book about Jesus and Christianity. I like this book because it offers up Christianity in a positive light, not commercialized, no hint of any social conservatism/right of center politics, and most importantly no littering of fundamentalist views. The Holy Longing speaks about spirituality in regards to Christianity instead of 'religion,' which is why I gave this book a change and I'm glad that I did. There is no phony Christian agenda evident, just a book about discovering your OWN personal relatoinship with God.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Perhaps one of the best spiritual books ever written. This book really provides a persuasive argument for the human need for spirituality and a sound foundation for anyone who wants to practice an authentic Christian faith, especially the Catholic faith. It gave me a vocabulary and appreciation for the faith I have been practicing and challenged me to go deeper on several levels. Great and easy read that can transform you very quickly!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This is a great book to offer people who have lost their Christian way or are interested to Christianity. The author is a Roman Catholic priest and brings in the joy and fullness of faith of the Catholic faith in certain parts. His perspective of certain issues has really opened my eyes. I do find a stretch to some of his conclusions to Biblical readings but his stories paint a great picture and helped me relate to his points to Christianity.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jan Petrozzi

    By far, this is one of the best books I have read. Rolheiser presents a look at spirituality in a way that, until now, was unfamiliar to me. I cannot think of anyone I know who would not benefit from reading this book. I want to send it to all of my friends. It is lovely. Received an assignment to read certain chapters each week for a theology class and I couldn’t help but to jump ahead and finish it way before it was due. Hated to put it down to attend to my other assignments.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cameron M

    I've got some mixed feelings about this book. A dear priest friend of mine gave this to me to read back in college several years back, and I lost track of it. Recently, I picked it up again when I was perusing through my books to grab another one to read. There's good, and there's bad. Another review here mentioned that, "when it's good, it's very good. When it's bad, it's horrid." I think those words are true here in regards this book. When I'm leaping for joy after having finished a book becau I've got some mixed feelings about this book. A dear priest friend of mine gave this to me to read back in college several years back, and I lost track of it. Recently, I picked it up again when I was perusing through my books to grab another one to read. There's good, and there's bad. Another review here mentioned that, "when it's good, it's very good. When it's bad, it's horrid." I think those words are true here in regards this book. When I'm leaping for joy after having finished a book because I not longer have to read that book, I don't consider that a wonderful thing. It's important that we reflect on the book itself and ask ourselves, "was I the intended audience for this writer?"I think it's only fair and just to review it according to the answer we have for that question. I want to say that the author intended this to be read by anyone, but perhaps more beneficial to particular individuals in certain places on their "spiritual" journey. As a practicing and active Catholic who tries to immerse oneself in apologetics, philosophy, and theology, I didn't find this book particularly beneficial for myself. It was not enthralling or exciting. It was rather boring to read, in my opinion. There was much redundancy and repetition, which made me slug along even slower. The last time I was this bored reading a book immersed in spirituality was the Confessions by St Augustine (whom I love dearly, don't get me wrong) and that book took me like 5 years to read. I think part of the bore was that the author seemed to stretch awfully far to make connections and conclusions, such as sex being the primordial energy in the universe, calling God a mother, and the like. I also get bummed when I see a Catholic priest make incorrect references to to quotes (such as the classic quote attributed to St Francis). I think the book would likely best suit someone of a secular walk who has some interest in the Christian thought of parts of spirituality. The author had many gems and one liners, one of which I liked: "It is not so much that we misunderstand what the incarnation means, it is more that we grasp only the smallest tip of the great iceberg. We miss its meaning by not seeing its immensity." (pg 75). Lines like this show up time and again throughout the read, and admittedly, kept me engaged just enough to plow through and try to find more.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James

    “Spirituality is, ultimately about what we do with that desire...about what we do with the fire inside of us...how do we channel it, the disciplines and habits we chose to live by, will either lead to a greater integration or disintegration within our bodies, minds, souls...in the way we are related to God [and] others...” Very Helpful.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joe Kimmell

    Overall I loved it. Being protestant I don't agree with all positions or ways of thinking about every subject, but that being said... WOW. I LOVED it. The opening on DESIRE and EROS and placing those in deeply important places in our Christ-following categories is HUGE. Your spirituality is what you do with your desire. So Good. The way he writes engages your doubt and your secularism and confronts them while inviting your whole humanity into the process. Really excellent. The chapter on the spi Overall I loved it. Being protestant I don't agree with all positions or ways of thinking about every subject, but that being said... WOW. I LOVED it. The opening on DESIRE and EROS and placing those in deeply important places in our Christ-following categories is HUGE. Your spirituality is what you do with your desire. So Good. The way he writes engages your doubt and your secularism and confronts them while inviting your whole humanity into the process. Really excellent. The chapter on the spirituality on sexuality is worth the price alone. Be discerning but please read this.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Holley

    Beautifully written and thought out. I took my time reading this and found myself thinking about certain passages throughout my day. Rolheiser makes the case for combining religion and spirituality and how you can't have one without the other. He is able to challenge his reader in a loving way that makes you trust him and try to understand his point of view. I look forward to reading more from him and plan to come back to this book when I need to be reminded to look for peace within myself and m Beautifully written and thought out. I took my time reading this and found myself thinking about certain passages throughout my day. Rolheiser makes the case for combining religion and spirituality and how you can't have one without the other. He is able to challenge his reader in a loving way that makes you trust him and try to understand his point of view. I look forward to reading more from him and plan to come back to this book when I need to be reminded to look for peace within myself and my community of faith.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Linda Robins

    As is frequently the case, this book came to me just at a time when I needed it the most. Father Rolheiser's loving, intelligent writings are the perfect antidote for the "crazy Christians" who seem to be the public face of faith in the US right now. His God is loving, intelligent, and expansive--I will return to this book many times when I need a "tune-up" from cynicism and reassurance that ignorance and intolerance are never a part of following Christ.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Valuable book. I will need to read again to digest. An easy read but concepts deserve contemplation. One of the few books that actually provides a unique and authentic perspective. Not cliche or tired.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Larry Wood

    Plenty of inspiring insights into aspects of Christian spirituality that we rarely visualize so clearly. Fr. Rolheiser gives innumerable concrete examples of the points that he is making. One example: the difference between praying in a merely theistic way and praying in a decidedly Christian, incarnational way. "...if my mother is sick, and I pray that she gets better, but do not drive her to see the doctor, I have prayed as a theist, not as a Christian. I have not given any incarnational flesh, Plenty of inspiring insights into aspects of Christian spirituality that we rarely visualize so clearly. Fr. Rolheiser gives innumerable concrete examples of the points that he is making. One example: the difference between praying in a merely theistic way and praying in a decidedly Christian, incarnational way. "...if my mother is sick, and I pray that she gets better, but do not drive her to see the doctor, I have prayed as a theist, not as a Christian. I have not given any incarnational flesh, skin, to my prayer." If I see a colleague or a friend who is depressed and pray for her, but do not speak to her, then I am praying like a theist, not as a Christian.....Our prayer needs our flesh to back it up." (pg.84) Rolheiser implores us not to take the Incarnation lightly, as meaning that God became man, stayed here for 33 years, and then left us with the Holy Spirit. A kind of 33 year experiment. He maintains "The incarnation is still going on and is just as real and as radically physical as when Jesus of Nazareth, in the flesh, walked the dirt roads of Palestine." It continues in the body of believers. The phrase "We are the Body of Christ" is not an exaggeration, nor a metaphor for Rolheiser. He finds this the core of Christian spirituality. "We have to keep God present in the world in the same way as Jesus did." (pg.80)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jackie St Hilaire

    When all is said and done: "We come from God, we return to God". But it's the years in between that make us grow, sometimes it is forced growth and other times we choose. In the last part of life is when most of the choices have to be made because if we haven't figured it out yet, we could severally damage our inner soul. Better to be prepared. Ron Rohlheiser in his book "Holy Longing: The Search for a Christian Spirituality" gives us hope that all is not lost, that maybe, just maybe, we have made When all is said and done: "We come from God, we return to God". But it's the years in between that make us grow, sometimes it is forced growth and other times we choose. In the last part of life is when most of the choices have to be made because if we haven't figured it out yet, we could severally damage our inner soul. Better to be prepared. Ron Rohlheiser in his book "Holy Longing: The Search for a Christian Spirituality" gives us hope that all is not lost, that maybe, just maybe, we have made a few wrong turns on our journey. Forgiving ourselves and moving on can be a long process. You can take as long as you want but you might go deeper and deeper into the abyss. Little steps, don't get ahead of God. Be patient , we have all eternity.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    I have loved reading Fr. Ron Rolheiser's articles in the Catholic Register, but was never expecting how thoroughly I would enjoy this book! His reflection on Spirituality and the "Longing of the Soul" hit home. Rolheiser makes a worthy case on why community is so important to all of us - one of our greatest needs and points to the Church community as necessary for us to live. Each chapter is laid out in an understandable but not simplistic way and is so enjoyable to read. I look forward to readi I have loved reading Fr. Ron Rolheiser's articles in the Catholic Register, but was never expecting how thoroughly I would enjoy this book! His reflection on Spirituality and the "Longing of the Soul" hit home. Rolheiser makes a worthy case on why community is so important to all of us - one of our greatest needs and points to the Church community as necessary for us to live. Each chapter is laid out in an understandable but not simplistic way and is so enjoyable to read. I look forward to reading his other books.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    One of the most engaging books I've read on Christian spirituality in some time. A friend asked Rolheiser to write a book they could hand on to others, and to read when they needed to be rekindled. It fills that bill. Good coverage on God among us (the incarnation); on the Christian community (Church); on the life, death and resurrection of Christ (the paschal mystery); on justice and peace; on sexuality. Sound thinking is backed up by many examples from the author's life or from other stories. One of the most engaging books I've read on Christian spirituality in some time. A friend asked Rolheiser to write a book they could hand on to others, and to read when they needed to be rekindled. It fills that bill. Good coverage on God among us (the incarnation); on the Christian community (Church); on the life, death and resurrection of Christ (the paschal mystery); on justice and peace; on sexuality. Sound thinking is backed up by many examples from the author's life or from other stories. Well worth a read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Wickward

    I loved this book, with the slight exception of the few pages where he talked about having a “right” conception of God. His 5 “non-negotiables: community worship, social action, the centrality of the Incarnation, private prayer, and personal morality (holding tension) are not new to students of the devout life, but he finds new facets to each one that filled out for me these areas of my spiritual life. Great for new Christians and those much farther along in the journey. It is a fast read but do I loved this book, with the slight exception of the few pages where he talked about having a “right” conception of God. His 5 “non-negotiables: community worship, social action, the centrality of the Incarnation, private prayer, and personal morality (holding tension) are not new to students of the devout life, but he finds new facets to each one that filled out for me these areas of my spiritual life. Great for new Christians and those much farther along in the journey. It is a fast read but don’t read it quickly, it is a book to be pondered.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    While I enjoyed some of the chapters, most of the early part of this book was very heavy and required me to read and then let the book go for some time to "digest" the author's ideas. I had some real issues with a few of the chapters, specifically on social justice and spiritual sexuality, but that is most likely because my views are far more conservative that Rolheiser's. Overall, it was a thought-provoking book, even if I flat-out disagreed with some of his ideas. I suppose that is a good tens While I enjoyed some of the chapters, most of the early part of this book was very heavy and required me to read and then let the book go for some time to "digest" the author's ideas. I had some real issues with a few of the chapters, specifically on social justice and spiritual sexuality, but that is most likely because my views are far more conservative that Rolheiser's. Overall, it was a thought-provoking book, even if I flat-out disagreed with some of his ideas. I suppose that is a good tension- one that I can "sit and reflect on" and draw closer to God.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This book defines spirituality as something we all have. Then it goes on to define what Christian Spirituality looks like. The author lays out what most christians believe even though he, himself, is a Catholic. He looks at today's culture and gives tips about what a christian spirituality for our time should focus on. He emphasizes that we should not divorce christian spirituality from community and at the same time shows how we must also develop a private prayer life.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rick Rapp

    I was really touched by this book. I love the author's style: knowledgable without being pedantic or condescending. I like the organization and the topics touched upon. I believe I was meant to come upon this book at this point in my life and I hope to carry forth some lessons I learned and to ponder some questions and situations with greater understanding. I highly recommend this to anyone looking for additional perspective and peace.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Oh, this book was so good for the soul. I wrote down so many quotes that I ended up just deciding to buy the book! Honestly, about 1/4 of it went completely over my head, but everything else was so relevant and thought-provoking, even almost 20 years after publication. I would highly recommend this book to those who are seeking a deeper spirituality.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    One of the best books on spiritual guidance and understanding of God's place in our lives. I have reread this book and shared it with friends over the years because Fr. Rolheiser gives hope to people who are struggling along the journey in down to earth, practical ways without preaching but with gentle guidance and deep faith.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I saw one reviewer say basically that when this is good, it’s really good, but when it’s questionable... boy is it. There is some really... creative theology in here. But there are truly some wonderful gems that improved my thinking. Read with caution, but read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    He delves into spirituality, and what that word actually means and how it came to be so popular in our culture. We want to separate church from spirituality and our human relationships from it, but that's not what spirituality is at all...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    This book is so well written and really got me thinking a lot about my faith life and relationship with God. I'm glad I joined the book discussion group at church that was assigned to read this book. I've learned so much!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    Great short little book that covers a breadth of topics and how they are related to spirituality, specifically Christian spirituality. Does not go in-depth but the author acknowledges this at the beginning of the book. Brought up a lot of questions for me to answer for myself.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Round Mountain Public Library

    This is a spiritually uplifting book that is worth the time it will take to read it. This is a requested book that looks may peak your interest, so be sure to come to the Library and put a hold on in it soon.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    “Spirituality is about what we do with the fire inside of us..”. I have so many flags of things that spoke with me. This is one book I will definitely read again to absorb more. Very deep, very insightful and very enlightening.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.