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Spark Joy: An Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up

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Spark Joy is an in-depth, line illustrated, room-by-room guide to decluttering and organising your home. It covers every room in the house from bedrooms and kitchens to bathrooms and living rooms as well as a wide range of items in different categories, including clothes, photographs, paperwork, books, cutlery, cosmetics, shoes, bags, wallets and valuables. Charming line d Spark Joy is an in-depth, line illustrated, room-by-room guide to decluttering and organising your home. It covers every room in the house from bedrooms and kitchens to bathrooms and living rooms as well as a wide range of items in different categories, including clothes, photographs, paperwork, books, cutlery, cosmetics, shoes, bags, wallets and valuables. Charming line drawings explain how to properly organise drawers, wardrobes, cupboards and cabinets. The illustrations also show Ms Kondo's unique folding method, clearly showing how to fold anything from shirts, trousers and jackets to skirts, socks and bras. The secret to Marie Kondo's unique and simple KonMari tidying method is to focus on what you want to keep, not what you want to get rid of. Ask yourself if something 'sparks joy' and suddenly it becomes so much easier to understand if you really need it in your home and your life. When you surround yourself with things you love you will find that your whole life begins to change. Marie Kondo's first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying, presents her unique tidying philosophy and introduces readers to the basics of her KonMari method. It has already transformed the homes and lives of millions of people around the world. Spark Joy is Marie Kondo's in-depth tidying masterclass, focusing on the detail of how to declutter and organise your home.


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Spark Joy is an in-depth, line illustrated, room-by-room guide to decluttering and organising your home. It covers every room in the house from bedrooms and kitchens to bathrooms and living rooms as well as a wide range of items in different categories, including clothes, photographs, paperwork, books, cutlery, cosmetics, shoes, bags, wallets and valuables. Charming line d Spark Joy is an in-depth, line illustrated, room-by-room guide to decluttering and organising your home. It covers every room in the house from bedrooms and kitchens to bathrooms and living rooms as well as a wide range of items in different categories, including clothes, photographs, paperwork, books, cutlery, cosmetics, shoes, bags, wallets and valuables. Charming line drawings explain how to properly organise drawers, wardrobes, cupboards and cabinets. The illustrations also show Ms Kondo's unique folding method, clearly showing how to fold anything from shirts, trousers and jackets to skirts, socks and bras. The secret to Marie Kondo's unique and simple KonMari tidying method is to focus on what you want to keep, not what you want to get rid of. Ask yourself if something 'sparks joy' and suddenly it becomes so much easier to understand if you really need it in your home and your life. When you surround yourself with things you love you will find that your whole life begins to change. Marie Kondo's first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying, presents her unique tidying philosophy and introduces readers to the basics of her KonMari method. It has already transformed the homes and lives of millions of people around the world. Spark Joy is Marie Kondo's in-depth tidying masterclass, focusing on the detail of how to declutter and organise your home.

30 review for Spark Joy: An Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane Yannick

    Dear Marie Kondo, It is with great trepidation that I write this review of your newest book. I was berated by people all over the world after my critical Goodreads review of your first book, The Magical Art of Tidying. I received over 1800 likes and comments. Your rabid fans called me ethnocentric, hyperbolic, shallow, insensitive, unromantic, cold, narrow-minded, immature, a derisive mess, despicable, a pseudo-feminist (?), a possessor of ugly underwear, and they sent their deepest sympat Dear Marie Kondo, It is with great trepidation that I write this review of your newest book. I was berated by people all over the world after my critical Goodreads review of your first book, The Magical Art of Tidying. I received over 1800 likes and comments. Your rabid fans called me ethnocentric, hyperbolic, shallow, insensitive, unromantic, cold, narrow-minded, immature, a derisive mess, despicable, a pseudo-feminist (?), a possessor of ugly underwear, and they sent their deepest sympathy to the poor schmuck who married me. I was even contacted by a writer from the Chicago Tribune who was doing an article on the tidying craze. Others, who are evidently as unenlightened as me, saw humor in my review. One sweet soul even offered to replace my beige underwear with something more appealing. I turned that offer down as I think it goes against Goodreads' policies. Another particularly disgruntled reader suggested that I go hide under a rock. Well, that ain't happenin' cause I'm a 68 year old woman who says whatever she wants, whenever she wants. Threaten all you want, Kondofans cause Yannick doesn't panic. Although I have studied both of your books with uncharacteristic focus, I am left with some questions. I hope you can find it in your heart to answer them. Believe it or not, I started with 57 questions and condensed it to these measly 14: 1) I didn't realize that if you couldn't get joy from touching your clothes that you could hug them for further clarification. Just one thing, do you have any suggestions on how to remove all of those hugging wrinkles? 2) Although I did realize that clothes are plant fibers, I did not realize that they like to hold hands or be cheek to cheek. The first and last items seem to get the short-changed as they only have one hand to hold or one cheek to rub. Would you suggest plotting out a rotation system? 3) I don't own a camisole but it's good to know that if I had one I shouldn't "criticize it for its failure to stand up." This criticism would be very bad for the cami's soul. I totally get that but am I missing out on something big by not having a camisoul? 4) I know that my panties are supposed "to look like spring rolls" with only the front of the waistband showing. You said that you can fit seven pairs in a tissue box. Could you give me the dimensions of a Japanese tissue box? 5) I didn't realize that I had to unpack my suitcase within 30 minutes of my homecoming. To make this work for me, I've had to begin unpacking in the car on the way home from the airport. Have any of your clients had to this? Are their dropped articles causing lawn mower problems? 6) Thanks so much for the help offered about what to do with the pictures of my cheating, conniving ex-husband. I'd stuck them in a cabinet in the basement hoping for a flood. Now I know I should have put them in a paper bag facing inward with a pinch of purification salt. After doing this, I was able to discard them with no regrets and free up that mildewy spot in my basement. Is the purification salt on Amazon ok? 7) I never thought about how unrefined the inside of my bathroom cupboard must feel. When I took your advice and removed the loud and ugly labels it did add to the refinement but my husband was not too happy when he used my unlabeled hair removal creme on his man parts. I think he'll be ok. Do you have any doctors as clients who might be able to anonymously answer some embarrassing questions about damaged man parts? 8) I am bothered about one of your substitution anecdotes. You claim that you can always find a substitution for a discarded item that you later need. BUT....how do you think your frying pan felt when it had to hammer the nail into the wall? Do you regret throwing that hammer out because of its imperfect handle? What about the ruler you broke when you used it as a screwdriver? In your last book you wrote that daywear could not be demoted to loungewear. Aren't these substitutions even more egregious? 9) Do you think it would be possible to create a Joybit that could sit cheek to cheek with my Fitbit and detect when an item fulfills my joy criterion or when I've reached my click point? I can't seem to get consistent readings on my own. 10) Exactly what vibes do your clothes give off that let you know whether they're happier being folded or hung? Mine just don't seem to care. Do I need to stop buying my clothes at Walmart? 11) I see that "many of your clients say that their underwear drawer looks so beautiful that they can't resist opening it to gaze at its contents." I'm worried because I never have this urge. Do you think I should move my underwear to the kitchen as I spend more time there? 12) I don't have many hundred dollar bills to leave lying on the kitchen table so no worries there about them feeling forlorn and embarrassed. I have been doing a lot of sniffing of my smaller bills, coupons, and credit cards but I can't get the "dense metallic aroma" that most of your clients smell. Any advice on refining my sniffer? 13) I didn't need to go to Japan for a memory service for my childhood dolls. I simply took your advice--covered their eyes and gave them the heave ho. Can I use that same procedure for some unruly neighborhood kids or would that be crossing the line? 14) My husband did not know that I had taken your advice about storing kitchen scraps in the freezer. He thought the container of decayed meatballs and mushy tomatoes was holiday soup. He's out of the hospital but he's not one of your biggest fans. Let me end by saying what a lucky lady you are. Your ideas have made you rich in purse and spirit. You have only ever had one client rebound which is an amazing stat. You and your new husband (2014) use folding and tidying to keep your relationship fresh. Have you ever thought about officially changing your name to Joy? Until you write again, Diane Yannick, West Chester PA

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    This is a fine follow-up to The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. I listened to the audio version, and found the accompanying PDF helpful enough that I didn't need the printed text. Don't let Kondo's animism put you off; even if you're uncomfortable with thanking your possessions for their service before discarding them, there is much to be learned from this book. For Kondo, tidying is really a means to the end of mastering the space in which you live, and making it a place that nourishes rat This is a fine follow-up to The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. I listened to the audio version, and found the accompanying PDF helpful enough that I didn't need the printed text. Don't let Kondo's animism put you off; even if you're uncomfortable with thanking your possessions for their service before discarding them, there is much to be learned from this book. For Kondo, tidying is really a means to the end of mastering the space in which you live, and making it a place that nourishes rather than oppresses. There is significantly more detail here, including great ideas for dealing with the miscellany (komono) that can be so hard to control. I have used the method on my clothes, and have had success in keeping it tidy. Implementing it throughout the house is a much bigger undertaking, but I am already envisioning the result!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elyse (retired from reviewing/semi hiatus) Walters

    Spark Joy or Kill Joy? According to Marie Kondo.... her KonMari Method of tidying up is nothing short of life-changing. Every time I walked into any book store... This little book ( kinda attractive), seems to always be near the front of the store...with many copies. I've yet to touch the book myself. I actually had NO IDEA what the book was about until walking early yesterday morning. While random looking at audiobook's on my overdrive app, I see this book is available. By the way...the downsid Spark Joy or Kill Joy? According to Marie Kondo.... her KonMari Method of tidying up is nothing short of life-changing. Every time I walked into any book store... This little book ( kinda attractive), seems to always be near the front of the store...with many copies. I've yet to touch the book myself. I actually had NO IDEA what the book was about until walking early yesterday morning. While random looking at audiobook's on my overdrive app, I see this book is available. By the way...the downside to audiobook 'listening/searching' the way I have, come with consequences. I'm on the trail- I decide I want to listen to a book. I can't see what the book is about...( just a photo of the cover) - I'll download a few - maybe as many as 8 books at a time - try each out - send back the ones I don't like. The problem has been ---I've sent back 90% of the books. Sometimes I invested 2 hours of listening to each book. (or an hour anyway) For example: I listen to 2 hours of "Let Me Be Frank With You" by Richard Ford....I liked it - but never finished it ....Then felt I'd kinda rather 'read' his book....( yet in this case his voice was nice enough)....but I forgot about the book --and before you knew it --the library time ran out. But in most other cases I just don't care about the book enough to stay with it. I put my music back on and keep walking. It's this reason - I've 'almost' decided to go with Audible. Buy 1 book a month. Return Policy if I don't care for the book. Seems like I might have a wider selection of book choices to fit my fancy. Plus, Paul can listen to these too....(so I'm still considering) Back to THIS REVIEW ON THIS BOOK: It will be short... I listened to the audiobook for 90 minutes until I had enough! I got the general idea....which 'was' ENOUGH! No way, am I going to follow detailed instructions about how to create joy in my life. I was beginning to feel exhausted by all the rules. The author had a lot of 'MUST DO's'. I understand it can be extremely liberating to toss out things, and re-create fresh. But I really don't need to hug every item I own or bless it. The value I took away in the 90 minutes I spent with the audiobook.... 1. many people around the world have gotten miracles from her work. The author told us so. I believe her. I'm thrilled for them....(really I am). 2. I'm happy with my own style of tidying up and organizing. I might make a few changes-(remodel) --but not from her rule book. 3. So..... I made JOY-choice ...... I turned off the audiobook. Put my music back on..and I was back sparkling with joy! 4. I had a terrific laugh with Paul and Ali, ( our daughter), later that day...we considered hugging our forks before dinner. Or... If our forks didn't give us joy, we could always toss them out the window......and buy new JOY forks some other day! .........lol with JOY money!!! xo

  4. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    Spark Joy is author Marie Kondō's follow up to her internationally best-selling title, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. Kondo's not for everyone — some of her ideas are very different like treating your possessions as if they have spirits of their own and sorting items by smell — but I like her. I think it's because she is obviously very passionate about what she teaches. Her excitement seems to seek from the pages of her book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine Wahl

    Very unique way to organize items, minimalist and get rid of clutter easily. If you can't declutter after this book there might not be hope.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I got this book instead of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing because it has invaluable illustrations of Marie Kondo's folding style. (I started looking like one of these dogs when reading the descriptions of how to fold without any pictures.) From what I can tell, this book is an expansion of her first with some of the key concepts outlined a bit more clearly. I will be moving at the end of the week, and I packed all of my clothes over the weeken I got this book instead of The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing because it has invaluable illustrations of Marie Kondo's folding style. (I started looking like one of these dogs when reading the descriptions of how to fold without any pictures.) From what I can tell, this book is an expansion of her first with some of the key concepts outlined a bit more clearly. I will be moving at the end of the week, and I packed all of my clothes over the weekend. During this process, I had a revelation: because I had applied the Konmari method to my clothes over the last six months, I did not find any clothes I had forgotten about and I didn't need to donate anything - I had already done it! This is frankly shocking for someone who finds online shopping therapeutic and also only buys statement pieces. While I didn't follow the method exactly, I did approach my closet a little differently: not just "will this be useful?" but "am I excited about this?" (my personal stand-in for joy). Where this helped the most was with my komono. I am a compulsive postcard and tiny souvenir collector (buttons, pins), and I had some other mementos I've kept for at least ten years. I went through everything I had, got rid of my notes from German class, and downsized to one shoebox and one folder worth of items. It really made me happy going through the result. I think, more than anything else, the method of looking through personal items gave me permission to not feel silly about some of the (admittedly silly) things that I decided to hang onto. It's also nice to recognize that some of those things won't be as important in, say, five years, at which point they've served their purpose and I can move on. Anyway, I probably will not anthropomorphize my socks, but I do love the Konmari folding method. And I really like feeling that everything I own has a place to go.

  7. 5 out of 5

    7jane

    For a while, I didn't really know if I wanted to read about KonMari or not, but luckily I decided to choose this, largely due to Emily's review down here at the reviews (which says this is a expansion to her previous book, with some things explained a bit clearer, and there are illustrations to the folding styles Kondo recommends). I think there are some books that just work better when you read them instead of audiobooking them, mainly because you can reread and find places a bit bet For a while, I didn't really know if I wanted to read about KonMari or not, but luckily I decided to choose this, largely due to Emily's review down here at the reviews (which says this is a expansion to her previous book, with some things explained a bit clearer, and there are illustrations to the folding styles Kondo recommends). I think there are some books that just work better when you read them instead of audiobooking them, mainly because you can reread and find places a bit better, no risk of unpleasant or fast reader, and all that underlining, stickering of important bits, etc. I did have to pause now and them to breathe (haha) and to absorb a bit, but the subject was interesting enough that I read it faster that just the routine amount I make myself read of a book daily (about 41 pages). I made a bunch of notes for later, and will rewrite them into a clearer form at some point. I love the rubber band that comes with this hardcover. You can use it or not, but it does look nice when it's used. Just the kind of touchable bonus I like. This is somewhat different from minimalism-tidying (which aims for smaller amount of possessions) and usual decluttering techniques (in the idea of 'spark joy'). The focus is more on what you really want to keep, with putting in place coming afterwards for everything left. The folding illustrations are mostly concentrated in the clothes section, with one or two in other places. Advicing clients on tidying their homes is the author's work in Japan, and then there's her books. The point is to keep what 'sparks joy' when touched/seen, for you - others might give suggestions, but the final decision is yours. Knowing where to keep them also helps, but it doesn't come first. Some client/personal examples are given, but they don't disturb the main purpose of the book. It is helpful if you feel already ready to commit to this (even if it doesn' t happen immediately - like, for me I will probably be more likely to start on it after weight loss, since clothes appear first in tidying order). First the six basic rules of tidying are given, before we move on to the main text (commitment, knowing what home look you want after, discarding in every category before proper arranging, going by categories, in right order, and the 'spark joy' testing). Don't let her insistencies put you off, some of it will end up making sense later. In the main part: the first part talks about the concept of joy and finding motivation, the second goes deep into each category (clothes - books - papers - komono (misc. items, in smaller categories) - sentimental items). The third part shows the end result for each part of home, and what changes might appear afterwards, plus other people and this tidying process. The main positive impact for this tidying method will be for your mental well-being, which might improve also your outer life (like relationships). Some tips are a bit outside the main KonMari method of tidying, at least I made notes of them to separate notings (for example, checking on the expiring dates on some emergency supplies, or cleaning your suitcase outside and wheels after traveling). Of course there are things that are odd or even a bit irritating. For example, I disagree with the opinion that just not have yet read a book is a sole reason for discarding it. And no, I won't cut or tear a page off a book - I would do that for magazines only. And sometimes I prefer piling, not standing up, things. And you do have to be careful with what papers you discard - I think it's better to research first what the lenght of keeping is for some before letting go of them. She seems a bit optimistic about avoiding relapse back to messiness, and also about how after tidying other things in life get fixed too. Her talk about things' feelings and thanking them too is quite odd, but in my opinion these moves appeal to the part of self in one's head that still can't help but think object have 'feelings'). And anyway, you can freely ignore the odd bits. But for all the weaker bits and things I disagree with, I'm surprised how much I liked the book as a whole, and the method of tidying started to make sense, the further I got into the book. The client/personal examples made the reading lighter, and gave one some amusement too. I might not get into this right away, now, but I can see myself going through it when the time is right. A rewarding experience that made me think, amused me, and inspired me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mhairi

    I really enjoyed konmari's first book! I found it helpful, fresh, and it really did help me tidy up (pretty magically I might add) Since that book was released, I've read articles online about the method as it spread, and when I saw this book was due- I was thrilled! I was disappointed that this book didn't seem to provide anything new. If you've read the first book, and even seen one or two videos of her folding techniques on YouTube- you've pretty much read this book. I also think t I really enjoyed konmari's first book! I found it helpful, fresh, and it really did help me tidy up (pretty magically I might add) Since that book was released, I've read articles online about the method as it spread, and when I saw this book was due- I was thrilled! I was disappointed that this book didn't seem to provide anything new. If you've read the first book, and even seen one or two videos of her folding techniques on YouTube- you've pretty much read this book. I also think that if you haven't read her first one, you are probably better to start there (which she says in Ch1 too) because this is more of an overview than any solid detailed info about the process.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    If you are really serious about decluttering your life this book will give you the guidance you need. It should be something you've already thought about. It's not a book for people who love to be surrounded by a lot of stuff. Those people will just end up writing long reviews making fun of the book hoping for laughs from other people who don't get those who wish to live a more minimalistic life. The day we had to move my grandma from a 5 bedroom 6 bathroom home to a small condo was when I start If you are really serious about decluttering your life this book will give you the guidance you need. It should be something you've already thought about. It's not a book for people who love to be surrounded by a lot of stuff. Those people will just end up writing long reviews making fun of the book hoping for laughs from other people who don't get those who wish to live a more minimalistic life. The day we had to move my grandma from a 5 bedroom 6 bathroom home to a small condo was when I started thinking about downsizing. At her age she couldn't possibly go through all her stuff so it was left to us. That was sad. I want to make the decisions myself of what to keep and also make it easier for my kids one day. I don't want to leave them with tons of stuff they will have to dispose of. This book has me well on my way to living the life I want. Making fun of this method is passing judgment on those of us who would rather experience life than be weighed down by our possessions. Others need those possessions to feel they have lived life. There is no right or wrong way but the Konmari method is exactly what I needed.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    Initial reaction: I thought this was a thorough follow up to Marie Kondo's first book, with more expansions and cute illustrations to boot. This book has a slight edge for my enjoyment because of how streamlined and organized it is compared to the first book. Probably rating this about 4 stars. Full review: "Spark Joy" was a book I was anticipating reading following Marie Kondo's first book "The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up". I was at first afraid I wouldn't be able to read it for a while beca/>Full Initial reaction: I thought this was a thorough follow up to Marie Kondo's first book, with more expansions and cute illustrations to boot. This book has a slight edge for my enjoyment because of how streamlined and organized it is compared to the first book. Probably rating this about 4 stars. Full review: "Spark Joy" was a book I was anticipating reading following Marie Kondo's first book "The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up". I was at first afraid I wouldn't be able to read it for a while because of the long double-digit queue it had at my library. (Its hold list is still in the double digits even after my read of this book and the review I'm presently writing.) I'm thankful I grabbed this when I did because it ended up coming up for a special sale on Amazon. The KonMari method, like named after the author, is a methodology of organizing that relies keeping things that "spark joy", discarding things that don't, and placing items back in their proper place. She notes that this is a method that involves doing a large overhaul all at once and following a specific means of going through ones things in the method of organizing: clothes, books, papers komono (miscellaneous), and sentimental items. I remember thinking at the end of Kondo's first book that aspects of the method still felt like it didn't have a streamlined expansion, which left me wanting more though I was intrigued and inspired by it. Now I can say that "Spark Joy" not only streamlined the details of the KonMari method, but it clarified and showcased tips in a way that was well presented and had cute illustrations to boot. I appreciated seeing some of the examples of her clientele and the emphasis on creating a space that you love and are surrounded by that bring that feeling to you. I grinned also at the note to "pack drawers like a Japanese bento box" - which if you know anything about bento boxes are very neatly and carefully presented. I already know about the Japanese style of folding clothes (thank you YouTube, because that's how I fold all my clothes now), so reading it in this book was a refresher for me. I gained a lot of takeaway from this book in terms of the KonMari method and ways to incorporate it into my own system of organizing. I appreciated it (though honest to goodness, the only part of this method I know I won't be using is getting rid of books - though I'll apply it to magazines and newspapers that I'm trying to purge). I also liked that suggestions were made with respect to each part of the tidying process and approaches to each measure, including the large category of komono. In the end, definitely a read I would recommend to those looking for organization methodologies and personal productivity. I plan on seeing how it works for me and keeping this book as a handy reference. Overall score: 4/5 stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was 100% what I expected and needed out of a "master class." I read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up right around a year ago, and completed the entire KonMari process in the following months. However, although we'd pared down our possessions to only the things we love and use, I didn't feel like I had mastered how to organize and arrange what we had left for maximize efficiency and appreciation. This book has specific tips for every area tackled by the process, including a detailed secti This was 100% what I expected and needed out of a "master class." I read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up right around a year ago, and completed the entire KonMari process in the following months. However, although we'd pared down our possessions to only the things we love and use, I didn't feel like I had mastered how to organize and arrange what we had left for maximize efficiency and appreciation. This book has specific tips for every area tackled by the process, including a detailed section on the different parts of kitchen komono, and there are illustrations of sample ways of organizing to inspire and instruct. I particularly appreciated the step-by-step instructions on folding for just about every kind of clothing. I read this in two days in preparation for tackling the things we have in basement storage — we'd gone through them before, but there was a lot of stuff still loose and I wanted everything grouped and in labeled bins before we move this summer. Because I had Kondō's ruthless (but gentle) voice in my head, I was able to do a more thorough job than before, mostly by grilling my husband about things ("Do you actually need this? For what? When did you last use it? Will you use it if it's down here or should it go somewhere else?"). After reading the detailed information about folding and storing clothes, I also decided to reorganize my socks-and-underwear drawer. Some people have said that if you read this book you don't need to read the first one, and while she does give a quick-and-dirty overview of what's in the first book, I would highly recommend starting with that one if you can. The stories from the first book were what inspired me to actually undertake the full process in the first place; this book is more nitty-gritty for those who get stuck or, like me, just want to organize what they have left a little more neatly. So if you're already a Konvert but want a little boost, definitely pick this one up.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I found this book cluttered with boring and unhelpful anecdotes and also lacking in practical tips on how to actually tidy ones house. There's no real structure of how to go about it and there are a lot of gaps. For example, nowhere does the author mention coats, decorative items or art. She could have also been more practical in explaining when to tackle which task as you're reading the book. It wasn't really clear when I should put down the book and start tidying, and when to then read again a I found this book cluttered with boring and unhelpful anecdotes and also lacking in practical tips on how to actually tidy ones house. There's no real structure of how to go about it and there are a lot of gaps. For example, nowhere does the author mention coats, decorative items or art. She could have also been more practical in explaining when to tackle which task as you're reading the book. It wasn't really clear when I should put down the book and start tidying, and when to then read again and start putting things away. As far as I could gather you'll be spending at least a couple of hours (in my case the whole ordeal took two absolutely knackering days) with all your stuff you love in a pile on the by now very dusty and less than joy sparking floor. However, the overall approach of taking all your stuff out of your storage areas, examining each piece and throwing away what you don't like and putting the stuff you do like away NICELY is good. Ta-da. Overall it helped me clear out a lot of objects I wasn't using or didn't like – but the actual book needs some serious editing if it's going to be as good as what it's hoping to achieve in your life. Thank God I bought it as an ebook, otherwise it would be straight out the door.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Alan

    Before this book changed my life, my makeup products sat dangerously close to my skin care products blocking my vanity's now perfect energy. Also, as is typical for people with my blood type, I'd never considered the relief that comes with organizing my electronics by smell, or having the dignity to cover the faces of my stuffed animals with a cloth bag, before I throw them in the garbage. This is rectified and I've been transformed forever. The spirit of the universe moves within. (Usefulness o Before this book changed my life, my makeup products sat dangerously close to my skin care products blocking my vanity's now perfect energy. Also, as is typical for people with my blood type, I'd never considered the relief that comes with organizing my electronics by smell, or having the dignity to cover the faces of my stuffed animals with a cloth bag, before I throw them in the garbage. This is rectified and I've been transformed forever. The spirit of the universe moves within. (Usefulness of implementation: 4.0 / 5.0, writing and tone: 1.0 / 5.0 = 2.5 /5.0, rounded down)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sách Chuyền Tay

    An another great book from Marie Kondo. I'm feeling more excited and ecstacy on my way to becoming a Joyful guy. Some favorite quotes and notes: @The six basic rules of tidying 1. Commit yourself to tidying up 2. Imagine your ideal lifestyle 3. Finish discarding first 4. Tidy by category, not by location 5. Follow the right order: clothes, books, papers, komono (miscellany), and finally, sentimental items. 6. Ask yourself if it sparks joy "Clutt An another great book from Marie Kondo. I'm feeling more excited and ecstacy on my way to becoming a Joyful guy. Some favorite quotes and notes: @The six basic rules of tidying 1. Commit yourself to tidying up 2. Imagine your ideal lifestyle 3. Finish discarding first 4. Tidy by category, not by location 5. Follow the right order: clothes, books, papers, komono (miscellany), and finally, sentimental items. 6. Ask yourself if it sparks joy "Clutter accumulates when you fail to return objects to their designated place. If a room becomes cluttered “before you know it,” it is entirely your own doing. In other words, tidying up means confronting yourself. In contrast, dirt does accumulate of its own accord. It is a law of nature that dust and dirt pile up. Therefore, cleaning means confronting nature" "The best way to identify what does or doesn’t bring you joy is to compare. In the beginning, unless your feelings are very black-and-white, it’s hard to decide if something brings joy when you look at it by itself. When you compare it with a bunch of other things, however, your feelings become clear" "trick for identifying what gives you joy when you are just beginning to sort your clothes: start with the ones that you wear close to your heart" "I have a secret for raising our joy level for things we know we need but that fail to excite us: shower them with praise. Let them know that while they may not inspire joy, you really need them." If you read this book, the chance for you to become a tidying master is so high, I'm sure at it. Sky

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gina Beirne

    Although I may not (read: will not) fold all my underwear into origami, her principles of tidying up are well worth looking at. What is important to you? (Seems weird to say "spark joy" when referring to underwear.) I'm all about shedding stuff that is no longer useful in my life hence the two garbage bags and two boxes of stuff being jettisoned from my house. (Note: threw out aforementioned underwear...did not put in donate box.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    I've been reading through this book slowly. I've spent more time gradually taking it's advice than actually reading it now that I'm technically finished. I'll spare everyone here the details, but before I read this book my apartment looked a lot different. And though it took me some time to warm up to it's twee language, Marie's way of tidying really stuck a chord with me once I was open to it. I'm not done taking it's advice, but I appreciate what this book has done for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    alice (arctic books)

    I really liked this sequel to THE LIFE-CHANGING MAGIC OF TIDYING UP! However, I felt like it was more of a modification of the first book than adding something new to Kondo's ideas. A lot of the same concepts are recycled in this novel - keeping items if it "sparks joy", learning to tidy and organize items, etc., so don't expect much new information. Nonetheless, I do think that this book was an improvement to the first novel - there are tons of cute diagrams/doodles which help assist Kondo's in I really liked this sequel to THE LIFE-CHANGING MAGIC OF TIDYING UP! However, I felt like it was more of a modification of the first book than adding something new to Kondo's ideas. A lot of the same concepts are recycled in this novel - keeping items if it "sparks joy", learning to tidy and organize items, etc., so don't expect much new information. Nonetheless, I do think that this book was an improvement to the first novel - there are tons of cute diagrams/doodles which help assist Kondo's instructions very well. I also think it's organized a lot better; the first half is basically a summary of the Kondo's first book, just rewritten, but the second part is actually very concrete - she has separate chapters for how to tidy clothes (my favorite chapter, personally) to books to papers to other items in your household, and finally, she also has a chapter of various locations in your home and how to improve the area to truly spark joy. Frankly, with the inclusion of diagrams, the second half of this book a lot more digestible and enjoyable to read. (If anything, I would skip the first book and go straight to reading SPARK JOY.) Overall, a very satisfying second book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing felt a bit weird. it's successor, Spark Joy: An Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up felt more comfortable, whether because I was adapted to Ms. Kondō's perspective, or the weird-to-Mike factor had been throttled back.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah DiMento

    Honestly, I thought this book was weird. Like this author is just way too obsessed with tidiness. I consider myself pretty tidy but I'm never gonna close my eyes and hug a piece of clothing to my chest to decide whether "inspires joy." Eventually I was motivated to tidy my home though, so I guess the book did its job, even though I don't think I followed one suggestion from the book (taking all of mine and my fiance's clothes from the drawers/closets and putting them in one big pile to go throug Honestly, I thought this book was weird. Like this author is just way too obsessed with tidiness. I consider myself pretty tidy but I'm never gonna close my eyes and hug a piece of clothing to my chest to decide whether "inspires joy." Eventually I was motivated to tidy my home though, so I guess the book did its job, even though I don't think I followed one suggestion from the book (taking all of mine and my fiance's clothes from the drawers/closets and putting them in one big pile to go through each garment one by one sounds like something that would probably incite a panic attack in me. Like once everything is in a pile I'd stare at it thinking dear god what have I done)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cinzia DuBois

    3.5 stars. I tend to reserve 4/5 star ratings for books very beautifully written; but whilst the simplicity and minimalism of her writing didn’t warrant a higher rating, her content was insightful and well broken down. It’s a very simple read (that being said, I listened to the audiobook, but that was only 5 hours long), but highly effective. I’ve committed myself to purge this year (along with a no-buy year), and it really helped me reconsider my storage methods. I know what I want to keep in m 3.5 stars. I tend to reserve 4/5 star ratings for books very beautifully written; but whilst the simplicity and minimalism of her writing didn’t warrant a higher rating, her content was insightful and well broken down. It’s a very simple read (that being said, I listened to the audiobook, but that was only 5 hours long), but highly effective. I’ve committed myself to purge this year (along with a no-buy year), and it really helped me reconsider my storage methods. I know what I want to keep in my life and I’m looking forward to a much simpler future.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tara Brabazon

    Bloody hell. I'm not sure when they released smack into the water supply, but this book confirms that we have lost it, as a civilization. Three examples will confirm my statement. Clothes organization. “Start with tops because things worn closer to your heart make it easier to judge whether or not you feel joy.” It is fabric, love. Sort yourself out. Second example. “Store bras like royalty.” Women's underwear is satanic. It exists to make us feel uncomfortable. Bloody hell. I'm not sure when they released smack into the water supply, but this book confirms that we have lost it, as a civilization. Three examples will confirm my statement. Clothes organization. “Start with tops because things worn closer to your heart make it easier to judge whether or not you feel joy.” It is fabric, love. Sort yourself out. Second example. “Store bras like royalty.” Women's underwear is satanic. It exists to make us feel uncomfortable. Unworthy. Bits are not quite in the right place. I refuse to treat these hooky, yucky bonkers pieces of overpriced fabric as royalty. It is demonic lace, love. Sort yourself out. Example three. “Tidying up your books is the best way to increase your sensitivity to joy and your ability to take action." You touch my books - I'm taking an organ. You will increase my sensitivity to DEFCON 1 if you touch my books. Also, don't use the word sensitivity. I think I've just melted into a post-empathic spinach... Please - think about capitalism, work, leisure, women and men. Do not allow this nonsense to direct your actions. Shocking.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Ok, I’ve read Marie’s books one after each other... I’d definitely recommend reading the previous book of hers first. I actually prefer this book as Marie seems to have relaxed a bit in how she gets information over to the reader, and she tells us a lot more anecdotal stories, that are interesting. I’m not sure I can follow all her information but I’m going to give most of it a go. I’ve already gotten rid of about 40 books, so I’m off to a good start. Recommended.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Mackintosh

    Slow start, I almost felt like I was rereading "Life Changing Magic." Halfway through, Marie got to some tips about kitchens and bathrooms that was really lacking in the first book. I really enjoyed it! Love her.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jonathon

    I read this book thinking, "well of course this is how to tidy up! Makes total sense." The language may have been idiosyncratic at times ("spark joy" being especially prevalent), but none of the principals were a huge shock or revelation.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy 찡긋 Kim

    Even though she repeated herself about organizing, it encouraged me to clean my house. This is the step. First you have to discard and order them, keep them tidy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Giselle

    Better then her previous book because she finally had some diagrams. Most of her advice was the same, so I pretty much skimmed through it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    The companion book to the KonMari method, with even more details about how to do all the things. This tiny little book is meant to be read after, or in conjunction with, Kondo's bestseller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. Taken on its own/out of sequence, you can consider it the book to flip through to decide if you want to dive into the first book or not. However, it's definitely more logical to read these two books in order, since Spark Joy amplifies on the principles brought up in The companion book to the KonMari method, with even more details about how to do all the things. This tiny little book is meant to be read after, or in conjunction with, Kondo's bestseller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. Taken on its own/out of sequence, you can consider it the book to flip through to decide if you want to dive into the first book or not. However, it's definitely more logical to read these two books in order, since Spark Joy amplifies on the principles brought up in LCM. This is a brilliant strategy for getting a second book out of a first one, but it's more than just a gimmick. The logic of certain concepts that might sound hokey or woo-woo in LCM is explained more deeply in SJ. For example, it's easy to joke about potholders sparking joy or not, but Kondo goes on at length about what joy actually is, in the context of having a nice home, and it will make the most sense to people who own, rather than rent, their property. Folding is dicussed at great length, with illustrations, so if you were confused about how to do it in LCM, SJ gives you no excuse. Speaking of illustrations, most of the ones included here use bunnies that are so kawaii, it hurts. And the book, like its predecessor, is beautifully designed: tiny enough to fit in the palm of your hand, a calm/soothing cover, decent weight pages, a font that won't hurt your eyes...the feng shui of the whole is, I think, what makes these books so darned appealing. Well, that and the promise of living in a clutter-free home. The most useful section for most of us will be how to deal with family/spouses who DON'T want to be tidy. The secret appears to be focusing only on those things you can control, which is good advice for life anyway. You also shouldn't tidy in front of your housemates, lest they feel bad, and for the love of bunnies, DON'T get rid of their stuff without asking. Will this method work for you? If you're open-minded and/or willing to put aside your cynicism long enough to take it for a test drive, you might be surprised. I KonMari-d my clothes today, and am pleasantly surprised by how much more spacious the house feels already (especially since it's not like I had tons of clothes to begin with). Books are next, which might prove to be my Waterloo, but at least it's not boring! A fun social experiment for the snowy months.

  28. 4 out of 5

    AdiTurbo

    Okay, so this second KonMarie book is even crazier than the first, and Kondo herself is a self-professed obsessive-compulsive who talks to underwear and thanks papers. Still, she is very good at motivating you to get off the couch and put some order in your house, and has a strong point in her instruction to keep only stuff that makes you happy. We in the West all have way too much stuff in our homes anyway, which should go to recycling or to someone who would be happy to accept it. On top of th Okay, so this second KonMarie book is even crazier than the first, and Kondo herself is a self-professed obsessive-compulsive who talks to underwear and thanks papers. Still, she is very good at motivating you to get off the couch and put some order in your house, and has a strong point in her instruction to keep only stuff that makes you happy. We in the West all have way too much stuff in our homes anyway, which should go to recycling or to someone who would be happy to accept it. On top of this, Marie Kondo has lots of experience tidying, which makes her able to give really great tips for a more aesthetic and comfortable home. There's no reading this book without starting to notice all of the untended dark corners of your house. I threw away around 60% of my wardrobe last week, and about four big garbage bags this week, and I plan to go on. I can't promise to follow the KonMarie (what a ridiculous name) method to the dot, but I will do what I can at this point, which is more than I did before I read this book (and the first one).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    While the first one was my kick starter and has me inspired to clear,tidy and declutter my life, this book does a great job hitting on the finer points. How to break categories down best and when to part with items. I loved bits about keeping something you love just because. The idea of keeping a costume or something and even just wearing it around the house. I love it! Less wasteful! The using the nicer dishes or parting with them if they don't bring you joy, etc really is resonating with me. I While the first one was my kick starter and has me inspired to clear,tidy and declutter my life, this book does a great job hitting on the finer points. How to break categories down best and when to part with items. I loved bits about keeping something you love just because. The idea of keeping a costume or something and even just wearing it around the house. I love it! Less wasteful! The using the nicer dishes or parting with them if they don't bring you joy, etc really is resonating with me. I had started my declutter journey earlier this year but now I want to start over and do it this way! Some great ideas! Although I still will never use her method on how to deal with books exactly. Shelves full of unread books do bring my joy though so she can't complain! This book even touches on the one concern I had in the last book (what about items that you 'need' but bring no joy). I can't wait to really dive into my tidying of my life!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    Everything you REALLY need to know about Marie Kondo's tidying method you can find in her first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. From there, you can pretty much figure out the rest yourself, but if you need a bit of reinforcement and would like more specific tips (not to mention a bit of hand-holding with categories which are harder for you), this is a helpful book. Here, Marie repeats the main concepts, and then really gets in the nitty-gritty of tidying up and organizing Everything you REALLY need to know about Marie Kondo's tidying method you can find in her first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. From there, you can pretty much figure out the rest yourself, but if you need a bit of reinforcement and would like more specific tips (not to mention a bit of hand-holding with categories which are harder for you), this is a helpful book. Here, Marie repeats the main concepts, and then really gets in the nitty-gritty of tidying up and organizing. She gives very specific tips about storing (or discarding) every sort of thing, to help you along after you finished the part where you choose what you're keeping and need to figure out the organization. She definitely delves deeper than in her first book here. I'm not going to follow every single tip but I did find most of them to be useful. They're really going to help me to take better care of my things.

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