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Cuore (eBook Supereconomici)

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Cuore, libro per ragazzi scritto da Edmondo De Amicis, fu un grande successo, tanto che de Amicis divenne lo scrittore più letto d'Italia. L'ambientazione è all'indomani dell'unità d'Italia, e il testo ha il chiaro scopo di insegnare ai giovani cittadini del Regno le virtù civili, ossia l'amore per la patria, il rispetto per le autorità e per i genitori, lo spirito di sacr Cuore, libro per ragazzi scritto da Edmondo De Amicis, fu un grande successo, tanto che de Amicis divenne lo scrittore più letto d'Italia. L'ambientazione è all'indomani dell'unità d'Italia, e il testo ha il chiaro scopo di insegnare ai giovani cittadini del Regno le virtù civili, ossia l'amore per la patria, il rispetto per le autorità e per i genitori, lo spirito di sacrificio, l'eroismo, la carità, la pietà, l'obbedienza e la sopportazione delle disgrazie.


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Cuore, libro per ragazzi scritto da Edmondo De Amicis, fu un grande successo, tanto che de Amicis divenne lo scrittore più letto d'Italia. L'ambientazione è all'indomani dell'unità d'Italia, e il testo ha il chiaro scopo di insegnare ai giovani cittadini del Regno le virtù civili, ossia l'amore per la patria, il rispetto per le autorità e per i genitori, lo spirito di sacr Cuore, libro per ragazzi scritto da Edmondo De Amicis, fu un grande successo, tanto che de Amicis divenne lo scrittore più letto d'Italia. L'ambientazione è all'indomani dell'unità d'Italia, e il testo ha il chiaro scopo di insegnare ai giovani cittadini del Regno le virtù civili, ossia l'amore per la patria, il rispetto per le autorità e per i genitori, lo spirito di sacrificio, l'eroismo, la carità, la pietà, l'obbedienza e la sopportazione delle disgrazie.

30 review for Cuore (eBook Supereconomici)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tom LA

    "Cuore" means "Heart" in Italian. This "classic" book by Edmondo De Amicis describes the life of an Italian school class a few years before 1900, as seen through the eyes of a boy, Enrico. Given that the book was published in 1886, and was later utilized for political propaganda by many governments, not only in Italy, there are some fascinating aspects to the book's history. But before touching on that, I'd like to say this is at its core a very poetic, touching little book. So despite all the p "Cuore" means "Heart" in Italian. This "classic" book by Edmondo De Amicis describes the life of an Italian school class a few years before 1900, as seen through the eyes of a boy, Enrico. Given that the book was published in 1886, and was later utilized for political propaganda by many governments, not only in Italy, there are some fascinating aspects to the book's history. But before touching on that, I'd like to say this is at its core a very poetic, touching little book. So despite all the political and ridiculously patriotic themes, I really liked it as it stands as a fine portrait of pure feelings, and innocence. Some readers found it sad, I didn't. The author explained how he was inspired to write it by his own son, Furio, and his love for school. The book reads as an utopistic and moralistic fable. Everything and everyone in "Cuore" is idealized - the book was meant to teach school kids the moral values and model behaviours of an idealized Italian citizen. To better understand the source of these values, we need to consider that De Amicis was part of the Italian elite, and his father held a high government post. The people who engineered the unification of Italy in 1860 had one common arch-enemy: the Pope and the Church, who opposed the inclusion of Rome in the new Kingdom of Italy. As a consequence, the school kids in "Cuore" spend their entire school year without ever mentioning, thinking, seeing, or going to a church, which is clearly unrealistic given that (for good and for bad) the Catholic Church has always had an immense influence in the day to day life of Italians. Even Christmas is totally ignored! Interesting fact: the book was taught in many Italian schools, and that's often enough to make you hate a book: "Oh, God, not "Cuore"!!" Back to the political themes: it's not too clear whether De Amicis wrote this as pure propaganda for the King, or that was just part of the process. One thing is for sure: according to this book, the perfect kid is the one who sacrifices his own life for his nation and his King. I like to think that this was just a reflection of the author's beliefs. Through its sensitivity to social issues such as poverty, "Cuore" has been initially linked to left-wing ideologies. De Amicis was later to join the Italian Socialist Party. Because of this, the book remained influential in countries of the Eastern Bloc. However, its patriotic message was later adopted by Mussolini's government and there are still people who remember "Cuore" being used as fascist propaganda. In conclusion, I don't know what the author's true purpose was, I just want to remember this book in a good light. Many Italians, when reading this book, comment "These were times when values still mattered!". I don't think that is correct at all. A more precise statement, in my opinion, would be that "Cuore" reminds us of a time when things were much simpler than today, and, as a consequence, it was easier for everybody to point out the right and the wrong. Despite the soppiness, and the utopistic and moralistic tendencies, "Cuore" is still a very poetic and inspirational book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cristina

    This book was read to me when I was a child. The person who read it to me was my first teacher. At that time, I didn’t quite understand the meaning of the book, but now, after reading it myself, after so many years, I’m so thankful to my teacher for initiating me into the meaning of this book, into the meaning of kindness. This book is pure gold. Every child should read this book. Or, better said, someone should read this book to all children. This book thought me again the meaning of being good This book was read to me when I was a child. The person who read it to me was my first teacher. At that time, I didn’t quite understand the meaning of the book, but now, after reading it myself, after so many years, I’m so thankful to my teacher for initiating me into the meaning of this book, into the meaning of kindness. This book is pure gold. Every child should read this book. Or, better said, someone should read this book to all children. This book thought me again the meaning of being good. Of sharing. Of the importance of teaching, teachers and learning to be kind. I’m so happy I decided to read it myself. I also wrote to the teacher thanking her for what she did for me. And I feel relieved and happy. Thank you, miss Eli, for teaching me how to step into the life with kindness in my heart! ❤️

  3. 4 out of 5

    AP

    This book was widely read in translation when I was growing up in Taiwan. I re-read it during summer 2007 both in the Chinese and English translations, and I'm still moved by the life lessons in this simple diary of a schoolboy attending 3rd and 4th grade in an Italian town. His family, friends, and teachers teach him compassion, kindness, and humility by example and through thoughtful discussions and letters. This book made me wonder whether we were neglecting the moral and emotional education This book was widely read in translation when I was growing up in Taiwan. I re-read it during summer 2007 both in the Chinese and English translations, and I'm still moved by the life lessons in this simple diary of a schoolboy attending 3rd and 4th grade in an Italian town. His family, friends, and teachers teach him compassion, kindness, and humility by example and through thoughtful discussions and letters. This book made me wonder whether we were neglecting the moral and emotional education of children now that the adults are constantly rushing from one place or task to the next. I think that I'll slow down periodically and talk to my children more about how to relate to their friends and community.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maciek

    I loved "Heart" when I was a kid. I've read it several times...the title is very appropriate, as it touched my heart during every reading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dorottya

    I don't know where to start writing my thoughts about this book. I have conflicted emotions. First of all, it's clear that the writing is amazing: it is easily accessible for kids, but not dumbed down, which is hard to find in a kid's book, especially nowadays. It really is authentic, you really feel as if these words are taken from an 8-year-old. It also is really moving and touching. It's heart-wrenching to see how many things changed since the setting of this book. How k I don't know where to start writing my thoughts about this book. I have conflicted emotions. First of all, it's clear that the writing is amazing: it is easily accessible for kids, but not dumbed down, which is hard to find in a kid's book, especially nowadays. It really is authentic, you really feel as if these words are taken from an 8-year-old. It also is really moving and touching. It's heart-wrenching to see how many things changed since the setting of this book. How kids and their parents are extremely caring about other people's problems (I mean, even the mean rich kid's father was polite and helpful... nowadays, we see loads of people being totally ignorant or even mean if they meet someone who is poor), helping those in need, more fortunate and less fortunate kids playing together with the parents encouraging them to do so. It's also nice to see how the class's best student and the bulky guy are really caring, humble, modest and how they eager to learn... and how learning is actually a "hip thing". It also seems sweet how the preceding teachers of classes care about the kids they don't teach anymore, visit their families, trying to keep up with their studying achievements... and it was also sweet how everyday hero kids were praised. At the same time, probably also because of the time gap between this novel and the time I was a teen, there were a lot of parts which seemed weird. Weird in a way that "whew, these are the moments I'm glad I was a kid in the 1990s". Some of the educational methods of the parents seemed a bit exaggerated. They were so mean to poor Enrico for so petty things it was incredible... and they rarely even praised him for anything... he didn't say too many things himself, but from some of his opinions, he seemed like a good boy. I also thought sometimes they were caring too much about others' opinions... I mean, (view spoiler)[ I totally get the fact that Garrone was really sad because his mom died, but did Enrico's mom really need to push his son away when they saw him the way back from school? It is so wrong on so many levels... Garrone should learn to cope with the pain, and he was going to realise there are a lot of moms out there who are alive... and it was probably really hurtful for Enrico to have her mom not hold her hand... (hide spoiler)] Some parts seemed really didactic in a way too cutesy, "into-your-face" fable type of way (the letters, Silvia's talking to her mom about the financial situation, the little hero stories)... But for the most part, I really enjoyed the books. I liked how there were so many distinct characters (I liked the edition I had, because it had an illustration of the kids in the inside cover with names, so if I was a bit confused in the beginning about who was whom, I could just turn some pages backwards and check).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Akemi G.

    Because I reviewed some of my childhood favorites, GR has been suggesting similar books, and this is one of them. I read this in Japanese, and I remember I loved the many inner stories, although the overall tone was a bit preachy. The Japanese translation's title was the phonetic equivalent of the Italian original, so I know this is the book I read. However, the English translation and its description is -- quite misleading and unappealing. If the poor translation is the main reason why this boo Because I reviewed some of my childhood favorites, GR has been suggesting similar books, and this is one of them. I read this in Japanese, and I remember I loved the many inner stories, although the overall tone was a bit preachy. The Japanese translation's title was the phonetic equivalent of the Italian original, so I know this is the book I read. However, the English translation and its description is -- quite misleading and unappealing. If the poor translation is the main reason why this book has mostly been forgotten, it's a pity . . . I believe the original was quite unique and lovely.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lee Kokle

    This book was actually read to me for the first time. My brother, who is a passionate reader, had a tradition of reading me books before sleep and this was one of them. At that time I did not understand it much, because although this is one of the children's book collection called "Sprīdīša bibliotēka", it is actually a book good for teenagers and adults. De Amicis touches very important feeling concerning families and portrays Italy at the time of unification. He portrays different s This book was actually read to me for the first time. My brother, who is a passionate reader, had a tradition of reading me books before sleep and this was one of them. At that time I did not understand it much, because although this is one of the children's book collection called "Sprīdīša bibliotēka", it is actually a book good for teenagers and adults. De Amicis touches very important feeling concerning families and portrays Italy at the time of unification. He portrays different social issues, such as poverty that was spread through Italy at the time and he does that through the eyes of a shool children, in particular, the main hero Enrico Bottini and his family. Enrico is a primary school student and he comes from an upper class but at school, there are working class children around him. These children are all set as role models for Italy as such creating a vivid picture of the ways of living at the time. Enrico receives letters from his mother, father and sister. They express their concern and wishes him to do well in life seeing all the children around him who are very different. It sometimes is hard for Enrico to justify his own doing because of his background. De Amicis has done a great job and this book is an example for adults and teenagers alike, through the time because the social issues met in the book are seen today as well and great family values are expressed and underlined in the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Schulman

    I read this because Ernst Gellner said he read it as a boy in the Carpathians - it's a very Resorgimento schoolboy's book about a gentleman's son who goes to public primary school in the 1880s with all the town boys, before going their separate ways, the hero to the Lyceum, the other boys to the manual training schools. It's full of heart - sentimental stories about schoolboy heroes, poor boys losing their mothers, parental affection in Italy, bullies, snobs, dandies, villains, a visit to the ol I read this because Ernst Gellner said he read it as a boy in the Carpathians - it's a very Resorgimento schoolboy's book about a gentleman's son who goes to public primary school in the 1880s with all the town boys, before going their separate ways, the hero to the Lyceum, the other boys to the manual training schools. It's full of heart - sentimental stories about schoolboy heroes, poor boys losing their mothers, parental affection in Italy, bullies, snobs, dandies, villains, a visit to the old schoolmaster of the hero's father, little notes from the hero's father and mother teaching him a lesson about this or that, the suffering of the poor, the sacrifices of the Garibaldians, aristos with hearts of gold - a really charming book. If one were learning Italian, I would think it would be a great reader.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Yiming li

    "the heart of a boy", compared to becomes the love many things, is really this also is not only these. I thought that “the love will be anything” will not have the explicit answer, but I knew that “the love” will not have the limit, slightly to schoolmate's between friendly conversation, teacher to student's encouragement, the parents to child meticulous showing loving concern, a people's smile which will meet by chance ......Big enough to contributes the marrow, gives blood, helps the Project H "the heart of a boy", compared to becomes the love many things, is really this also is not only these. I thought that “the love will be anything” will not have the explicit answer, but I knew that “the love” will not have the limit, slightly to schoolmate's between friendly conversation, teacher to student's encouragement, the parents to child meticulous showing loving concern, a people's smile which will meet by chance ......Big enough to contributes the marrow, gives blood, helps the Project Hope ...... Although will be similar to the air love sometimes the quilt “the pollution”, “dilution”, even “vanishing”, but hoped that more people will feel in the simple language the deep love, I thought "the heart of a boy" this good book will take this kind of happy feeling more people.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joana Doko

    I read this book a few years ago, in that time I was going through some bad things. This book was my saviour, my escape from the reality. I think that every kid should read this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Farseer

    The remarkable Italian novel Cuore (that's the Italian word for "Heart") was published in 1886, shortly after the Italian unification, and it soon achieved enormous popularity in Italy and abroad and became a classic of children’s literature. In less than three months 41 editions were needed in Italy and it was immediately translated to 18 languages and published throughout Europe. By 1923 it had been translated all over the world and had surpassed the at the time extraordinary figure of a milli The remarkable Italian novel Cuore (that's the Italian word for "Heart") was published in 1886, shortly after the Italian unification, and it soon achieved enormous popularity in Italy and abroad and became a classic of children’s literature. In less than three months 41 editions were needed in Italy and it was immediately translated to 18 languages and published throughout Europe. By 1923 it had been translated all over the world and had surpassed the at the time extraordinary figure of a million copies. The book, inspired by the author’s two sons, is an imaginary diary written by Enrico Bottini, a 9-year-old schoolboy in the third form of an elementary school in Turin, in the north of Italy. As the preface puts it: This book is specially dedicated to the boys of the elementary schools between the ages of nine and thirteen years, and might be entitled: “The Story of a Scholastic Year written by a Pupil of the Third Class of an Italian Municipal School.” In saying written by a pupil of the third class, I do not mean to say that it was written by him exactly as it is printed. He noted day by day in a copy-book, as well as he knew how, what he had seen, felt, thought in the school and outside the school; his father at the end of the year wrote these pages on those notes, taking care not to alter the thought, and preserving, when it was possible, the words of his son. Four years later the boy, being then in the lyceum, added something of his own, drawing on his memories, still fresh, of persons and of things. Generations of Italian children were raised with this book, where it was required reading at schools. Because of its patriotic and nationalistic values, it remained popular even during the Fascist regime. At the same time, because of its emphasis on social issues such as poverty (the author would later join the Italian Socialist Party) the book was also very influential in the countries of the Eastern bloc in Europe, and later became also popular in China and other Asian countries, and in Latin America. De Amicis’ aim was to teach moral and civic values, such as kindness, compassion, humility, respect, love for family and friends, solidarity between social classes, work ethic and patriotism. He used very moving plots and language: this book is a tear-fest if you are susceptible to sentimentality, sometimes tears of sadness but often because of feel-good emotion. If you don’t like sentimentality you are not going to like the book. It is utterly and unashamedly sentimental, hence its title, and also didactic. The book is easy to mock now, being too sentimental, preachy, utopic and idealistic for modern sensitivities, depicting a world where there is clear right and wrong instead of moral complexity, but if you can see it in its context and don’t mind that it’s old-fashioned you may find it very readable, moving and charming. As someone said in a Goodreads review: “a child who has read this book could not become a bad person”. In time, the book also faced criticism as some of its values were contested, starting with Umberto Eco’s famous “In Praise of Franti” in 1968 (Franti is the “bad boy” in Enrico’s class, the only one whose heart the teacher Perboni cannot reach, and who for Eco is the only one who rejects the rhetoric and classism of bourgeoisie society). Another highlight are the stories that Enrico’s teacher tells the boys, one every month, each of them about a boy who is in some way a role model. Some of those have become famous on their own as short stories or novellas, one of them perhaps even more popular than the whole book. I’m talking about "From the Apennines to the Andes," the story of Marco, a poor Italian boy whose mother has to emigrate to Argentina to be able to support her family. But after she writes to her family that she is sick, her letters stop coming. So Marco decides to go to Argentina himself to look for her. He manages to cross the ocean and travels across Argentina to find her, having many adventures during his journey and meeting some wonderful people. A good number of movies, animated series and TV shows have been made about that story. To give you a taste, here’s a short passage where a new boy of immigrant parents comes to the school. The boy is from the far-away south of Italy. He has a different accent, wears different clothes and even looks different from the other boys, with brown skin and very dark hair. Being different, and human nature being what is it, the boy would normally be a target of mockery from the other boys. However, this is how the teacher introduces him to his new schoolmates: (…) The director went away, after speaking a few words in the master’s ear, leaving beside the latter the boy, who glanced about with his big black eyes as though frightened. The master took him by the hand, and said to the class: “You ought to be glad. Today there enters our school a little Italian born in Reggio, in Calabria, more than five hundred miles from here. Love your brother who has come from so far away. He was born in a glorious land, which has given illustrious men to Italy, and which now furnishes her with stout laborers and brave soldiers; in one of the most beautiful lands of our country, where there are great forests, and great mountains, inhabited by people full of talent and courage. Treat him well, so that he shall not perceive that he is far away from the city in which he was born; make him see that an Italian boy, in whatever Italian school he sets his foot, will find brothers there.” So saying, he rose and pointed out on the wall map of Italy the spot where lay Reggio, in Calabria. Then the teacher calls on a boy, who is one of the leaders of the group, to welcome him in the name of the class. The boy does so and both boys shake their hands and embrace, while the others applaud: (…) All clapped their hands. “Silence!” cried the master; “don’t clap your hands in school!” But it was evident that he was pleased. And the Calabrian was pleased also. The master assigned him a place, and accompanied him to the bench. Then he said again:— “Bear well in mind what I have said to you. In order that this case might occur, that a Calabrian boy should be as though in his own house at Turin, and that a boy from Turin should be at home in Calabria, our country fought for fifty years, and thirty thousand Italians died. You must all respect and love each other; but any one of you who should give offence to this comrade, because he was not born in our province, would render himself unworthy of ever again raising his eyes from the earth when he passes the tricolored flag.” Hardly was the Calabrian seated in his place, when his neighbors presented him with pens and a print; and another boy, from the last bench, sent him a Swiss postage-stamp. In another passage, when Enrico is reluctant about going to school because he finds it boring, this is part of the pep talk his father gives him: (…) Reflect in the morning, when you set out, that at that very moment, in your own city, thirty thousand other boys are going like yourself, to shut themselves up in a room for three hours and study. Think of the innumerable boys who, at nearly this precise hour, are going to school in all countries. Behold them with your imagination, going, going, through the lanes of quiet villages; through the streets of the noisy towns, along the shores of rivers and lakes; here beneath a burning sun; there amid fogs; in boats, in countries which are intersected with canals; on horseback on the far-reaching plains; in sledges over the snow; through valleys and over hills; across forests and torrents, over the solitary paths of mountains; alone, in couples, in groups, in long files, all with their books under their arms, clad in a thousand ways, speaking a thousand tongues. From the most remote schools in Russia, almost lost in the ice, to the furthermost schools of Arabia, shaded by palm-trees, millions and millions, all going to learn the same things, in a hundred varied forms. Imagine this vast, vast throng of boys of a hundred races, this immense movement of which you form a part, and think, if this movement were to cease, humanity would fall back into barbarism; this movement is the progress, the hope, the glory of the world. Courage, then, little soldier of the immense army. Your books are your arms, your class is your squadron, the field of battle is the whole earth, and the victory is human civilization. Be not a cowardly soldier, my Enrico. In other entry, Enrico is sent to the girls’ school to take a copy of one of his teacher’s stories, since one of the schoolmistresses there had asked for it. He witnesses this incident there: Opposite the door of the school, on the other side of the street, stood a very small chimney-sweep, his face entirely black, with his sack and scraper, with one arm resting against the wall, and his head supported on his arm, weeping copiously and sobbing. Two or three of the girls of the second grade approached him and said, “What is the matter, that you weep like this?” But he made no reply, and went on crying. “Come, tell us what is the matter with you and why you are crying,” the girls repeated. And then he raised his face from his arm,—a baby face,—and said through his tears that he had been to several houses to sweep the chimneys, and had earned thirty soldi, and that he had lost them, that they had slipped through a hole in his pocket,—and he showed the hole,—and he did not dare to return home without the money. “The master will beat me,” he said, sobbing; and again dropped his head upon his arm, like one in despair. The children stood and stared at him very seriously. In the meantime, other girls, large and small, poor girls and girls of the upper classes, with their portfolios under their arms, had come up; and one large girl, who had a blue feather in her hat, pulled two soldi from her pocket, and said:— “I have only two soldi; let us make a collection.” “I have two soldi, also,” said another girl, dressed in red; “we shall certainly find thirty soldi among the whole of us”; and then they began to call out:— “Amalia! Luigia! Annina!—A soldo. Who has any soldi? Bring your soldi here!” Several had soldi to buy flowers or copy-books, and they brought them; some of the smaller girls gave centesimi; the one with the blue feather collected all, and counted them in a loud voice:— “Eight, ten, fifteen!” But more was needed. Then one larger than any of them, who seemed to be an assistant mistress, made her appearance, and gave half a lira; and all made much of her. Five soldi were still lacking. “The girls of the fourth class are coming; they will have it,” said one girl. The members of the fourth class came, and the soldi showered down. All hurried forward eagerly; and it was beautiful to see that poor chimney-sweep in the midst of all those many-colored dresses, of all that whirl of feathers, ribbons, and curls. The thirty soldi were already obtained, and more kept pouring in; and the very smallest who had no money made their way among the big girls, and offered their bunches of flowers, for the sake of giving something. All at once the portress made her appearance, screaming:—“The Signora Directress!” The girls made their escape in all directions, like a flock of sparrows; and then the little chimney-sweep was visible, alone, in the middle of the street, wiping his eyes in wonder, with his hands full of money, and the button-holes of his jacket, his pockets, his hat, were full of flowers; and there were even flowers on the ground at his feet. As I said, it is old fashioned in its values (how could it not be?), and it might be too heavy-handed for modern audiences. Patriotism, particularly, is taken further than I would like. But it is also readable, sincere and earnest, with many moving incidents. If anyone is curious, the book can be downloaded for free, as it is long out of copyright. This is the English translation at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/28961

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lenny Husen

    4 stars. This is a book published originally in Italian in 1886--a father wrote the book based on his son's School Journal of the year 1880-1881 when the son was in Fourth Grade (age 11-12). Some of it seems to be fictionalized slightly in order to improve the cohesiveness of the narrative and to promote the father's agenda which was apparently to promote himself as being patriotic and noble while simulaneously micromanaging his son. What I didn't like: the father was hypercritical of his s 4 stars. This is a book published originally in Italian in 1886--a father wrote the book based on his son's School Journal of the year 1880-1881 when the son was in Fourth Grade (age 11-12). Some of it seems to be fictionalized slightly in order to improve the cohesiveness of the narrative and to promote the father's agenda which was apparently to promote himself as being patriotic and noble while simulaneously micromanaging his son. What I didn't like: the father was hypercritical of his son and inserted entries into the journal exhorting his son to be more serious and respectful. Example: son is delighted at parade of soldiers in beautiful uniforms, father criticizes son for being joyful when so many soldiers die in battle. Another example: son and his friends are shouting and playing in the first snowfall, his father criticizes him because some people are without heat in the winter. But I turned this to my advantage by Speed Reading any passages written from the father's perspective. I don't Speed Read often (when I was younger I used to think it was "cheating") but I do know how and it was good to employ it for the moralistic tedious treacley admonishing passages. The parts written by the boy's perspective were very good, and there was interesting Italian history tidbits (current events in the late nineteenth century). The fact that the book was written over 130 years ago makes it a window into another time. This belongs on the shelf next to Little Women. The boy's classmates (and some of their parents) are delightful, often amusing characters and very real people portrayed lovingly. Over the course of the year a younger boy in the school dies, a teacher dies, and a friend's mother dies--this was a time in history when that was probably routine for a school year. It seems as if Turin (Torino in Northern Italy) must have been a special community of hard-working folks who took care of each other and looked after all the children. As a Physician, the illnesses and how they were described fascinated me. Sepsis, rickets, influenza, heart failure, fatal pulmonary disease, deafness, developmental delay, were all mentioned. This would be a terrific book for a gift for any School Teacher because of the emphasis on just how special, wonderful, patient, decent and dedicated most Primary School Educators are. This is in fact the major theme of the story and it is a worthy one.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matkie

    I found this little gem in my mother's closet when I was around 10. It's not a book for everyone. I'm sure a lot of people find it boring and hard to identify with, since the background and the message are pretty clear: late nineteenth century in Italy, a new nation that still lacks a sense of unity. What the country needs is a new generation raised with a strong nationalistic feeling, and this is book is a response to this issue. Enrico(whose name I actually don't remember reading in the book s I found this little gem in my mother's closet when I was around 10. It's not a book for everyone. I'm sure a lot of people find it boring and hard to identify with, since the background and the message are pretty clear: late nineteenth century in Italy, a new nation that still lacks a sense of unity. What the country needs is a new generation raised with a strong nationalistic feeling, and this is book is a response to this issue. Enrico(whose name I actually don't remember reading in the book since he never presents himself to the reader) is a ten year old boy who goes to a public school in Turin and meets all kinds of kids there. There are poor children, rich children, smart children, sick children, older children, all in the same class. The book is written as a diary, where Enrico tells the things he saw or listened that day. For example, one weekend he goes with his father to visit one of the teachers he had as a kid, and the old man tells a story about one of his students. In another entry, Enrico tells that the class has a new teacher because the regular one got sick, and the new teacher tells them about the school for the blind and how blind kids learn and live. The book also features some stories that are not written by Enrico, but were sent them by his teacher to hand copy because... nineteenth century. I have to be honest and say that I haven't read all of these stories because some of them are eternal. By far the longest story is "From the Apennines to the Andes", which takes place in Argentina(my country!!!!¡¡¡!) and portrays the subject of european immigration during the argentine historical presidences and this is where my inner historian duplicates its love for this book. Now, if you came this far in what I'm writing, you might think "this might be like an old fashioned, more children oriented version of epistolary novels I like, like The Perks of Being a Wallflower". Well... no. I wish and I'm sure there are novels like what you are thinking(the one that comes to my mind is Daddy-Long-Legs). But remember. This book was written as propaganda for italian nacionalism. There are many parts of the books that anyone can understand and identify with without really knowing about this part of italian history. But then there are others entries that are... skippable. There are long and detailed descriptions of military parades, I think a funeral procession of a king, a price handing ceremony to things like bravery, and... bravery. The featuring stories also tend to focus on patriotism. In a nutshell, the book has a main message: be patriotic, love the city, place, country you are growing up in, love your neighbour and your friends and value them regardless of their social background, respect your elders, value education(specially public education), and always try your best, because even the poor, the blind, the deafs and the disadvantaged find meaning and beauty in life. Sadly, pretty much in that order. I don't have much more to say. It's my favourite book mostly for personal reasons. One thing the book makes good: you feel like you are there, in the early years of Italy, in a simpler world where you were happy with few things and order didn't always mean fascism, but order and hopes for a bright future.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Isabella Campollo

    Reviewed by: Isabella Campollo I gave this book 5 stars because I believe it is a very emotional book that everyone can relate to, no matter your age, nationality, or gender. How does this book relate to my hero's journey? The book is about Enrique's life. He is a very sensitive kid who gets exposed to a lot of things during his years in school. The book is written as if it was a diary, so you really get to explore Enrique's feeling from his perspective as if it was you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wai Yip Tung

    I have first read Edmondo De Amicis' Cuore as a boy. Now I'm much older when I pick up this classics 19th century work for another time. It is still the same inspiring stories of courage, righteousness, gratitude, love and generosity. Now that I have learned much about positive psychology I can identify these pro-social behavior readily. The stories are so overflow with positive emotions that I appreciate them even more. The prominent feature in Cuore is the strong relationship among I have first read Edmondo De Amicis' Cuore as a boy. Now I'm much older when I pick up this classics 19th century work for another time. It is still the same inspiring stories of courage, righteousness, gratitude, love and generosity. Now that I have learned much about positive psychology I can identify these pro-social behavior readily. The stories are so overflow with positive emotions that I appreciate them even more. The prominent feature in Cuore is the strong relationship among people. The family is thre core. Everyone look out for each other unconditionally and all contribute to the welfare of the family as a team. School is where the children interact with the larger world. They respect thet teachers and take learning seriously. There is little bullying in Cuore. Because the children have a lot of empathy to those who are weak and poor. There is also a strong culture of generosity and righteousness. Conflict happens from time to time. But the faulty side have the courage to take responsibility and the violated side have the capacity to forgive. This is a positive role model we all can learn from. The class' monthly stories, a series of short novels within a novel, are often great inspirational highlights. A famous one is "From the Apennines to the Andes" about a boy whose mother has taken a job in the far away Argentina in order to support the family back in Italy. The family become worried when they lost contact to the mother. The boy has decided to travel to Argentina to find his mom. It was an epic journey across the Atlantic and then traverse the vast continent of Argentina as he learned her mother has moved from place to place around the country with her employer. It was a monumental test to the young lad in the unfamiliar country, who faced set back after set back but nevertheless have picked up courage and determination to find his mother. Also touching are the kindness of many strangers who have helped him and have given him money. How he can make it this far not is not the sheer resource of himself but also the connectedness of all people. With some 21th century perspective, if Cuore is to be written again today, I would minimize the passages on military and fervent patriotism. We are in the globalized world today. It is far less necessary to separate people into groups and see other people as enemies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nakamoto Yukiko

    This is a wonderful book. It includes many meaningful stories about simple things in real life. It gave me many valuable lessons and made me think about everything around and fulled my heart with love. Love comes from everywhere, even the smallest thing in the world or simply a thank or an sincere apology. We often forget the value of the surroundings, especially the quality of those who are considered doing normal work. The book reminds me that I should appreciate what I have and sympathize for This is a wonderful book. It includes many meaningful stories about simple things in real life. It gave me many valuable lessons and made me think about everything around and fulled my heart with love. Love comes from everywhere, even the smallest thing in the world or simply a thank or an sincere apology. We often forget the value of the surroundings, especially the quality of those who are considered doing normal work. The book reminds me that I should appreciate what I have and sympathize for the unlucky people.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Linh

    My childhood bed time stories. It is great that you read the book again once in a while to be reminded about kindness and bravery. Never forget who you have always wanted to become when you grow up.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Heart, touches many different issues based in the time it took place in regards to poverty, crime and education. You get to see the Italian life in the 1900’s through the perspective of a young fourth grade boy named Enrico. You follow Enrico as he learns different life lessons and begins to understand and adopt morals that led him to become one of the most loved characters I’ve ever had the pleasure reading about. The innocence that Enrico carries with him really pulls you in to the book Heart, touches many different issues based in the time it took place in regards to poverty, crime and education. You get to see the Italian life in the 1900’s through the perspective of a young fourth grade boy named Enrico. You follow Enrico as he learns different life lessons and begins to understand and adopt morals that led him to become one of the most loved characters I’ve ever had the pleasure reading about. The innocence that Enrico carries with him really pulls you in to the book and gives a sort of nostalgic feeling because it reminds you of a time when you were much younger and you were just starting to differentiate between right and wrong. There are very serious points within the book, realistic scary scenarios regarding poverty and death which make you think and feel for the characters in the book. You will learn a lot through the different social issues that Enrico is thrust in to connecting him to the 1900 Italian life style. Overall Edmondo de Amicis paints a very vivid picture of the Italian life at the time. Providing an era when some would say morals and life lessons were truly valued.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Estera Mihăilă

    This a -i've.read.it.quite.some.times.and.it.won't.stop.here- kind of book. And i will like it more and more based on a deeper understanding of the moral values that the novel centers on. Written in the form of a child's diary, it's simple in its storytelling and structure, yet the stories themselves and the lessons behind them are so powerful. It snatched some tears, some laughs and some yelling justly and indisputable. This is truly a get together of short stories that do yo good.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lorenzo Berardi

    I confess that when I was a child I was fascinated by this book. At that time I wasn't able to catch its unbearable paternalism, its overwhelming patriotism, its examples of juvenile heroism, its didactical meanings. If you're looking for some of these aspects or if you want to have a sweetened and moving fresco of Italian primary school just a few years after national unity in 19th century Cuore is the book you should read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Huong Ly

    A deeply touching book for all the children even adults. This reminds me the intrinsic value of people, which was misunderstood before when I thought this world is full of lies. No matter what happen, be kind, be strong and don't let dusts make you fool. In case having children, I would encourage them to read this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mayo Hyuga

    This was the first book I read. Its a REALLY old novel, but beautiful. I found this book when I was 11 years old in a box with alot of books. My mom told me that book was a gift of her grandma. Anyways, my mom never read it. I still want to read it again, its so beautiful... just one thing, I NEED to find that box again -.- This was the first book I read. It´s a REALLY old novel, but beautiful. I found this book when I was 11 years old in a box with alot of books. My mom told me that book was a gift of her grandma. Anyways, my mom never read it. I still want to read it again, it´s so beautiful... just one thing, I NEED to find that box again -.-

  23. 5 out of 5

    sandy

    I read this as a child translated in Chinese, and now I read it as an adult translated to English. It still holds the magic it did over 25 years ago. A much more compelling way of teaching morals than fables, it really touches the heart by illustrating everyday life. This might be a present I give regularly to parents with young children in the future.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Attila

    Cuore or Heart is the journal of 9 year old Enrico in 19th century Italy. It relates various adventures in and out of school, teaching moral lessons about human nature, friendship, patriotism, self-sacrifice. Allegedly written for political propaganda, nevertheless it is an engaging read about childhood joys and innocence.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emanuela

    Although it is considered a masterpiece of Italian literature, the reading of this book saddens to no end. You come to like more the characters in the fictional stories told through the book than the real protagonists of the novel. However, it gives a good idea of how poor Italians lived at the beginning of the 20th century

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicoleta Bucșă

    It was one of my first books, but I think it was the first that almost made my cry. It was touching and made me appreciate what I had. I was so sorry for the poor kid and, even though it was just a story, I wanted so badly to help him. This book made me think about a lot of things as a child and I think somehow it changed me for the better.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    Great book! It was a very different reading experience from most books, yet I enjoyed it. This is the diary of a boy in his third year of school in Italy sometime in the early 20th century or late 19th century.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gio

    This was one of my favourite childhood books. The stories are sad and moving and give a great idea of how Italian people were living in the late 19th century. However, as I grew older I found it a bit too patriotic and paternalistic, but still a great read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elias Gutierrez

    Very episodic. Even though it has great values behind, the ideal of loyalty and good live is totally deprived of God or any consideration of the nature of man and the supernatural. It is only based in philanthropic feelings of doing good and loving one's nation.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Phương Nhii

    The book that made my childhood.

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