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O Príncipe Feliz e Outras Histórias (Edição Bilíngue)

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O Príncipe Feliz e Outras Histórias' é uma coleção de 1888 de contos para crianças escrita por Oscar Wilde. As histórias incluídas nesta coleção são - 'O Príncipe Feliz', 'O Rouxinol e a Rosa', 'O Gigante Egoísta', 'O Amigo Dedicado', 'O Foguete Notável'.


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O Príncipe Feliz e Outras Histórias' é uma coleção de 1888 de contos para crianças escrita por Oscar Wilde. As histórias incluídas nesta coleção são - 'O Príncipe Feliz', 'O Rouxinol e a Rosa', 'O Gigante Egoísta', 'O Amigo Dedicado', 'O Foguete Notável'.

30 review for O Príncipe Feliz e Outras Histórias (Edição Bilíngue)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    ‘The Happy Prince and other Tales ‘is a collection of stories for children by Oscar Wilde first published in May 1888. It contains five stories’ ‘The Happy Prince’ ‘The Nightingale and the Rose’ ‘The Selfish Giant’ ‘The Devoted Friend’ and ‘The Remarkable Rocket’ I came across this wonderful little book at a recent book fair I attended! I wasn’t aware that Oscar Wilde had written any stories for children so I was intrigued to start reading. The stories a ‘The Happy Prince and other Tales ‘is a collection of stories for children by Oscar Wilde first published in May 1888. It contains five stories’ ‘The Happy Prince’ ‘The Nightingale and the Rose’ ‘The Selfish Giant’ ‘The Devoted Friend’ and ‘The Remarkable Rocket’ I came across this wonderful little book at a recent book fair I attended! I wasn’t aware that Oscar Wilde had written any stories for children so I was intrigued to start reading. The stories are beautifully written teaching us many valuable life lessons with a recurring theme that life doesn’t always have happy endings. My favourites were ‘The Happy Prince ‘ and ‘The Nightingale and the Rose’ both stories were incredibly poignant and sad. The edition I read also had stunning illustrations which only added to the beauty of Wilde’s exquisite storytelling. A treat to read for both adults and children alike.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Happy Prince and Other Tales = The Happy Prince and Other Stories, Oscar Wilde The Happy Prince and Other Tales is a collection of stories for children by Oscar Wilde first published in May 1888. It contains five stories: "The Happy Prince", "The Nightingale and the Rose", "The Selfish Giant", "The Devoted Friend", and "The Remarkable Rocket". The Happy Prince: In a town where a lot of poor people suffer and where there are a lot of miseries, a swallow who was left behind after his The Happy Prince and Other Tales‬ = The Happy Prince and Other Stories‭, Oscar Wilde The Happy Prince and Other Tales is a collection of stories for children by Oscar Wilde first published in May 1888. It contains five stories: "The Happy Prince", "The Nightingale and the Rose", "The Selfish Giant", "The Devoted Friend", and "The Remarkable Rocket". The Happy Prince: In a town where a lot of poor people suffer and where there are a lot of miseries, a swallow who was left behind after his flock flew off to Egypt for the winter, meets the statue of the late "Happy Prince," who in reality has never experienced true sorrow, for he lived in a palace where sorrow was not allowed to enter. Viewing various scenes of people suffering in poverty from his tall monument, the Happy Prince asks the swallow to take the ruby from his hilt, the sapphires from his eyes, and the golden leaf covering his body to give to the poor. As the winter comes and the Happy Prince is stripped of all of his beauty, his lead heart breaks when the swallow dies as a result of his selfless deeds and severe cold. The statue is then brought down from the pillar and melted in a furnace leaving behind the broken heart and the dead swallow and they are thrown in a dust heap. These are taken up to heaven by an angel that has deemed them the two most precious things in the city. This is affirmed by God and they live forever in his city of gold and garden of paradise.... تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز دهم ماه مارس سال 1971 میلادی عنوان: شاهزاده خوشبخت؛ نویسنده: اسکار وایلد؛ مترجم: حمید حقیقت جو؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، سازمان کتابهای پرنده آبی، 1344، در 169 ص، اندازه 16 در 11/5 س.م، موضوع: افسانه های پریان از نویسندگان بریتانیایی - سده 19 م پنج داستان کوتاه، و شش قطعه ی ادبی منثور، نوشته اسکار وایلد، شاعر و نویسنده ی ایرلندی، که برای گروه سنی نوجوانان، و جوانان ترجمه شده، زندگی‌نامه ی وایلد نیز، در ابتدای کتاب آمده است. «شاهزاده خوشبخت»، یکی از قصه‌ های کتاب، درباره ی مجسمه ی طلایی زیبای شاهزاده‌ ای ست، که بر فراز شهر ایستاده، پرستوی عاشقی که به خاطر علاقه به یک نی، از کوچ به سرزمین مصر، برای گذران زمستان، جا مانده، به سراغ مجسمه ی شاهزاده می‌آید. شاهزاده که از بالا، فقر و فلاکت مردمان شهر را می‌بیند، به یاری پرستو؛ نخست، سه یاقوت (شمشیر و دوچشم خویش)، و سپس ورقه‌ هایی از طلای مجسمه‌ ی خویش را، به دست نیازمندان شهر می‌رساند. با تمام شدن طلاهای مجسمه، نخستین برف می‌بارد، و پرستو که دیگر رمقی و فرصتی برای کوچ به مصر ندارد، در پای مجسمه شاهزاده، جان می‌بازد، و با این کار ... الی آخر، داستان‌های دیگر: ماهیگیر و روح او، دوست صمیمی، بلبل و گل سرخ، و غول خودخواه، هستند. باقی شادمانیهای خوانش همین کتاب. ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sidharth Vardhan

    “I like to do all the talking myself. It saves time, and prevents arguments.” These are a lot like Andersen's tales - fairy-tale kind of prose, talking objects, often with sad elements and sad endings. Add to it, Wilde's popular witticisms. The Rose and Nightingale is one of the most beautiful stories I have read. “I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying.” “Life is one fool thing after another whereas love is two fool things after each “I like to do all the talking myself. It saves time, and prevents arguments.” These are a lot like Andersen's tales - fairy-tale kind of prose, talking objects, often with sad elements and sad endings. Add to it, Wilde's popular witticisms. The Rose and Nightingale is one of the most beautiful stories I have read. “I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying.” “Life is one fool thing after another whereas love is two fool things after each other.” “I hate people who talk about themselves, as you do, when one wants to talk about oneself, as I do. ” “He must have a truly romantic nature, for he weeps when there is nothing at all to weep about.” “I like hearing myself talk. It is one of my greatest pleasures. I often have long conversations all by myself,” “What is a sensitive person?” said the Cracker to the Roman Candle. “A person who, because he has corns himself, always treads on other people’s toes,” answered the Roman Candle in a low whisper; and the Cracker nearly exploded with laughter.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    The popular author of The Book Thief, Markus Zusak aptly says in his introduction of this book: "There's something in these fairy tales that reminds me why any of us would want to be readers and writers in the first place, and that is that, the more amazing the stories become, the more I believe them, and the more I realize that I won't forget them." For me, these stories are truly unforgettable! The Happy Prince : 5 stars (Amazing!) A formerly rich and only child prince is now a regal statue. The town people look up at him and ma/>The The popular author of The Book Thief, Markus Zusak aptly says in his introduction of this book: "There's something in these fairy tales that reminds me why any of us would want to be readers and writers in the first place, and that is that, the more amazing the stories become, the more I believe them, and the more I realize that I won't forget them." For me, these stories are truly unforgettable! The Happy Prince : 5 stars (Amazing!) A formerly rich and only child prince is now a regal statue. The town people look up at him and marvel at his beauty. One day, a swallow gets separated from his fellow birds going to Egypt since winter is forthcoming. While the swallow is about to sleep at the foot of the statue, a tear falls from the weeping statue and a series of "Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow" follows. Heartbreakingly nice. Good deeds get their paybacks in the end. The Selfish Giant : 3 stars (I liked it!) A Giant is so selfish that he does not want children to play in his yard with a beautiful garden so Nature (the Wind, Hail, Snow) work against him. Winter stays forever in his yard even if, outside its wall, is already at the height of summer. The Giant becomes lonely (I know, winter could be depressing) so he breaks down the wall and let the children play again in his garden. What happens towards the end is a fitting story for the Holy Week as a character reveals His true identity. The Devoted Friend : 1 star (I did not like it!) I almost really liked this except that there is no redeeming value in the end. The good Little Hans seemed to have died in vain. He was fooled by Miller into believing that the latter was his friend and he would get his damaged wheelbarrow. I am okay with being friendly but not to the extent of sacrificing myself or going hungry just to make my friend happy. That's balderdash! The Remarkable Rocket : 2 stars (It's okay) The naive self-centered rocket thinks highly of himself. He is the drama king so he wets himself crying of joy thinking that he is being reserved by the palace for special occasion. So, he just stays there unlighted and eventually left and thrown out in the gutter. We all know about these people. Sad but true. There are rockets around us. The Nightingale and the Rose : 4 stars (I really liked it!) I agree with Zusak: this is so sad, so brave of a nightingale to give her own life so that the daughter of the Professor would dance with the young student. But the nightingale is just too naive with the ways of the heart for the girl does not reciprocate the student's love. The nightingale ends up on the gutter: unappreciated and dead. Sad, Zusak but no redeeming value. Wasted heroism. The Young King : 3 stars (I liked it!) An illegitimate shepherd's son ends up as the only heir of a dead king. Not used to riches, he is very excited about living in the palace and wearing his robe. One night, he dreams of the poor people who work hard to come up with the gems that are to be put on his robe as decors. On the coronation day, he refuses to wear the robe so he is disowned by the nobilities. The Christlike coronation and references to Jesus should rank this tale higher than the rest of fairy tales. The Birthday of the Infanta : 2 stars (It's okay.) A hunchback dwarf is given as a gift to princess Infanta only to end up neglected in the end. Reminded me of The Velveteen Rabbit who thought that his master loved him. Sad but just like the Devoted Friend story there is no redeeming value. The princess says in the end "For the future, let those who come to play with me have no hearts." The Star-Child : 4 stars (I really liked it!) Reminds us, once again, that what goes around, comes around. That beauty is just skin-deep. What is more important is what's in our hearts. The star-child is found in the forest by two woodcutters. The first one says that they leave the poor child on the snow because, poor as they are, they don't enough food for their families to survive the winter. The other one says no and takes pity to the child. The child grows up to be a handsome man but heartless to the extent of disowning his own mother who disguises as a beggar. The Fisherman and his Soul : 5 stars (It's amazing!) A young man is in love with a mermaid who says that they cannot live together under the sea if the young man will not leave his soul. So, the young man asks the witch to separate himself from his soul. The soul is afraid and asks for the fisherman's heart. The fisherman cannot give his heart away since he needs it to love the mermaid. I don't know what happened to me. This is my first time to read this story so probably that made a greater impact to me than the Happy Prince (first story). This story reminds me of Murakami's Hardboiled Wonderland and the End of the World where the man and his shadow are separated. Like the other stories, this is still a sad one. But Wilde's storytelling is truly remarkable that you feel with the characters even how implausible, this being a fairy tale, the plot is. This is my second book (first was De Profundis) by Oscar Wilde and I have only one word for him: genius.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Happy Prince and Other Tales = The Happy Prince and Other Stories, Oscar Wilde The Happy Prince and Other Tales (also called "The Happy Prince and Other Stories") is a collection of stories for children by Oscar Wilde first published in May 1888. It contains five stories: "The Happy Prince", "The Nightingale and the Rose", "The Selfish Giant", "The Devoted Friend", and "The Remarkable Rocket". The Happy Prince: In a town where a lot of poor people suffer and where there are a lot o The Happy Prince and Other Tales‬ = The Happy Prince and Other Stories‭, Oscar Wilde The Happy Prince and Other Tales (also called "The Happy Prince and Other Stories") is a collection of stories for children by Oscar Wilde first published in May 1888. It contains five stories: "The Happy Prince", "The Nightingale and the Rose", "The Selfish Giant", "The Devoted Friend", and "The Remarkable Rocket". The Happy Prince: In a town where a lot of poor people suffer and where there are a lot of miseries, a swallow who was left behind after his flock flew off to Egypt for the winter, meets the statue of the late "Happy Prince," who in reality has never experienced true sorrow, for he lived in a palace where sorrow was not allowed to enter. Viewing various scenes of people suffering in poverty from his tall monument, the Happy Prince asks the swallow to take the ruby from his hilt, the sapphires from his eyes, and the golden leaf covering his body to give to the poor. As the winter comes and the Happy Prince is stripped of all of his beauty, his lead heart breaks when the swallow dies as a result of his selfless deeds and severe cold. The statue is then brought down from the pillar and melted in a furnace leaving behind the broken heart and the dead swallow and they are thrown in a dust heap. These are taken up to heaven by an angel that has deemed them the two most precious things in the city. This is affirmed by God and they live forever in his city of gold and garden of paradise.... تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز یازدهم ماه مارس سال 1972 میلادی عنوان: شاهزاده خوشبخت؛ نویسنده: اسکار وایلد؛ مترجم: حمید حقیقت جو؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، سازمان کتابهای پرنده آبی، 1344، در 169 ص، اندازه 16 در 11/5 س.م، موضوع: افسانه های پریان از نویسندگان انگلیسی - سده 19 م پنج داستان کوتاه، و شش قطعه ی ادبی منثور، نوشته اسکار وایلد، شاعر و نویسنده ی ایرلندی، که برای گروه سنی نوجوانان، و جوانان ترجمه شده، زندگی‌نامه ی وایلد نیز، در ابتدای کتاب آمده است. «شاهزاده خوشبخت»، یکی از قصه‌ های کتاب، درباره ی مجسمه ی طلایی زیبای شاهزاده‌ ای ست، که بر فراز شهر ایستاده، پرستوی عاشقی که به خاطر علاقه به یک نی، از کوچ به سرزمین مصر، برای گذران زمستان، جا مانده، به سراغ مجسمه ی شاهزاده می‌آید. شاهزاده که از بالا، فقر و فلاکت مردمان شهر را می‌بیند، به یاری پرستو؛ نخست، سه یاقوت (شمشیر و دوچشم خویش)، و سپس ورقه‌ هایی از طلای مجسمه‌ ی خویش را، به دست نیازمندان شهر می‌رساند. با تمام شدن طلاهای مجسمه، نخستین برف می‌بارد، و پرستو که دیگر رمقی و فرصتی برای کوچ به مصر ندارد، در پای مجسمه شاهزاده، جان می‌بازد، و با این کار ... الی آخر، داستان‌های دیگر: ماهیگیر و روح او، دوست صمیمی، بلبل و گل سرخ، و غول خودخواه، هستند. باقی شادمانیهای خوانش همین کتاب. ا. شربیانی

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melindam

    Note to self: never ever try to read/finish this book on a train or anywhere in public! To think that the author who kept the stiff Victorians in stitches with his plays could write such heart-wrenching stuff.... Ahhhh, don't talk to me today, I am totally undone.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    A Beautiful Collection for All Ages Each little story is a beautifully told allegory touching to the heart. You will never be too old or too young to appreciate the marvellous moral in each story. The stories in this collection are: The Happy Prince, The Nightingale and the Rose, The Selfish Giant, The Devoted Friend, and The Remarkable Rocket. Many of my favourite epigrams come from this collection. Here are a few gems (of many): "Surely Love is a wonderful thing. It is more precious than emeralds, and dearer than f/>"Surely A Beautiful Collection for All Ages Each little story is a beautifully told allegory touching to the heart. You will never be too old or too young to appreciate the marvellous moral in each story. The stories in this collection are: The Happy Prince, The Nightingale and the Rose, The Selfish Giant, The Devoted Friend, and The Remarkable Rocket. Many of my favourite epigrams come from this collection. Here are a few gems (of many): "Surely Love is a wonderful thing. It is more precious than emeralds, and dearer than fine opals. Pearls and pomegranates cannot buy it, nor is it set forth in the marketplace. It may not be purchased of the merchants, nor can it be weighed out in the balance for gold." "Everyone quoted it, it was full of so many words that they could not understand." "I like hearing myself talk. It is one of my greatest pleasures. I often have long conversations all by myself, and I am so clever that I sometimes don't understand a single word of what I am saying." Wilde shows his softer side, yet retaining his ironic humour, exploring themes such as compassion, friendship, altruism, selfishness, love, self-awareness, and kindness. The fairy tales are simple yet engaging, with some very likeable characters, and also some very detestable characters we can all relate to. The characters, often animals or inanimate objects feel so real and natural with clear personalities exactly like people in society. We have probably met a real-life version of the boastful, pretentious, and arrogant Remarkable Rocket (the type of person I want to punch in the face!); and of the very kind and innocent little Hans. This is true for the minor characters as well as the major ones: such as the yes-men Town Councillors, the ignorant Water-rat, and the extremely materialistic girl. It is this realness of the characters which really captivated me. Wilde's subtle yet cynical satire of society is still perfectly relevant today. With such short stories, it is a wonder how Wilde managed to integrate such accurate and distinguished characters. The short stories evoke great emotion too. I felt happy, sad, annoyed and disappointed at times, sharing the characters' experiences. The stories may not leave you with a happy feeling, but that is precisely why they make such good reading: a story that can make you feel very sad or very annoyed is a good story, since it evokes a strong emotional response. These tales certainly do that. Precious few writers can do this, let alone in simple fairy tales. For me, no one writes as charismatically as Oscar Wilde. He makes great writing look so simple and easy. This work is elegantly written with fine little details and plenty to be admired again and again. My personal favourite in this collection is The Happy Prince, although it was extremely difficult to choose amongst these lovely little stories. If you do yourself one favour today, have a read of one these fairy tales. They are such a joy to read. If you love these stories as much as I do we can be best friends. I cannot recommend this book highly enough!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Srividya

    When you truly live your life, you have to learn to accept and maybe expect the rare and unexpected surprises that might be in store for you. These unanticipated wonders often bring about a lot of joy in our lives and sometimes also have the capacity of teaching us a gentle yet important lesson. My surprise for the day was this small little book, a set of short stories written by Oscar Wilde and believe me I was simply floored by the simplicity as well as the complexity there was in these tales. When you truly live your life, you have to learn to accept and maybe expect the rare and unexpected surprises that might be in store for you. These unanticipated wonders often bring about a lot of joy in our lives and sometimes also have the capacity of teaching us a gentle yet important lesson. My surprise for the day was this small little book, a set of short stories written by Oscar Wilde and believe me I was simply floored by the simplicity as well as the complexity there was in these tales. Being bored with all my current reads and totally tired after a hard morning at house cleaning, I decided to simply peruse my Kindle for some nice book or story to read. Mind you, I wasn’t in the mood for anything serious. Having just reviewed Wilde’s Dorian Gray, I decided to check his complete collection for some more such interesting tales and stumbled upon this book of short stories, which captivated me like no other book or tale and I was smiling and back into reading again. A little later when I saw that my enthusiasm to share my updates in GR was strong (and they usually are when I read something nice), I found that a dear friend of mine, someone who has become quite close to me in a very short time, had recommended this book, albeit indirectly. So I was doubly excited and resumed my reading. That Wilde is a fantastic writer is a well known fact but that he could write something for children, a tale which would be suited for all ages, is something that surprised me and obviously delighted me. This short collection has about 5 tales in it and each of them were delightful and with a moral to boot. What makes this anthology special is the fact that it is not in a preaching format but there is a slight tongue in cheek manner, which brought a delectable flavor; something that most moralistic tales don’t have these days, especially the adult ones. Each tale in this compilation was different but there was a strong lesson that could be seen in all. This was the lesson of love and friendship, how it differs in every scenario and what exactly is true love or devoted friendship. The lessons taught in these stories were of good and bad, bad might not be necessarily evil but more of the selfish kind, it talked of selflessness and how true love redeems everything in the end. All the stories were well written and I loved them all but if I had to pinpoint a single story that moved me the most, it was The Nightingale and the Rose, a truly remarkable tale, something that gives you the sky in terms of learning without taking away a bit of your enjoyment. This book is highly recommended for everyone. PS - Fatty, you are the best! :D

  9. 4 out of 5

    classic reverie

    These short stories were recommended by a Goodreads' friend, Amira K. after we were discussing Oscar Wilde's "The Portrait of Dorian Gray" (1890) and how I might like the children stories in "The Happy Prince and Other Tales" (1888). So I then put them on my list to read this year and having just finished these stories, I wanted to comment on both these books before I talk of the short stories. If you heard or read "The Portrait of Dorian Gray", you would know how dark a book it is and seeing th These short stories were recommended by a Goodreads' friend, Amira K. after we were discussing Oscar Wilde's "The Portrait of Dorian Gray" (1890) and how I might like the children stories in "The Happy Prince and Other Tales" (1888). So I then put them on my list to read this year and having just finished these stories, I wanted to comment on both these books before I talk of the short stories. If you heard or read "The Portrait of Dorian Gray", you would know how dark a book it is and seeing the movie long before reading the book which is a picnic compared to the book's darkness, IMO; I was quite impressed by reading these children stories which are on the opposite side of the spectrum, quite bright. You say, well they are children's stories written in the late 1800's, so it would be that way. Well what impressed me was that even many of these stories are quite sad, the moral is there in all its glory. I knew Oscar Wilde was a great writer having read his novel but having not read anything else yet, though on my "to read" list, but I see his wide range of ability as a writer is quite wonderful. I had no idea about his religious convictions but they shine through in these stories, two of them bring heaven and the Christ child into the story. One of my most favorite subject to come across in a story is the morality and religious precepts, that make the reader feel an uplifting feeling, even when things don't always work out. Wilde's stories had this all down with the sadness and showing us humans to live our lives in a positive light. If you have no religious beliefs, these stories are still wonderfully wholesome to read. Sometimes after reading a book, your whole feeling towards an author changes and Wilde made me love his works even more than before. One more thing I will touch on because it was brought up in the Delphi collection of his works which seeing it I had to comment here. "Later critics have identified an underlying homosexual relationship between the two protagonists, while others argue that these are simply tales told by Wilde for his own children." I saw nothing of this in the least and what I saw was friendship. I noticed before in reading some commentaries of classic works were the "modern view" is projected to mean something, that the author did not intend. Unless, evidence in memoirs tell of certain ideas, I don't look for what is not there. Is modern society, so bitter to think that true friendship, wanting to die for another, has to have a romantic element. Can't people love people for friendship sake alone? IMO, so I leave it there for you to read and decide yourself. The stories; 1) The Happy Prince- a sparrow helps his friend who sees misery from where he stands help alleviate some grief, he witnesses. 2) The Nightingale and the Rose- the nightingale gives everything for love. (My favorite) 3) The Selfish Giant- a giant comes back home to see his garden invaded. 4) The Devoted Friend- a Miller thinks his friendship is just wonderful. (This and the next story deal with self centeredness) 5) The Remarkable Rocket- the rocket thinks he is just wonderful and looks down on everything else. These stories are great for children and adults too, we all need a refresher course on being good human beings. 💕💕🌼💖😊 Adding September 11, 2018 -The radio version from Columbia workshop of The Happy Prince - 12/26/1936 https://www.oldtimeradiodownloads.com... Some changes but basically Oscar Wilde's story.😊

  10. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    I have found that any author I was forced to read in my ancient school days tends to be ignored these days when I can choose my own reading. Oscar Wilde certainly fits that statement. I remember having to dissect The Picture Of Dorian Gray for some class or other, and the only other work of his I have read since then was The Importance Of Being Earnest. I enjoyed that, but it did not inspire me to discover any more about or by Wilde. But a few days ago I noticed a review by fellow GR I have found that any author I was forced to read in my ancient school days tends to be ignored these days when I can choose my own reading. Oscar Wilde certainly fits that statement. I remember having to dissect The Picture Of Dorian Gray for some class or other, and the only other work of his I have read since then was The Importance Of Being Earnest. I enjoyed that, but it did not inspire me to discover any more about or by Wilde. But a few days ago I noticed a review by fellow GR group member Rick, discussing a graphic novel edition of two of Oscar Wilde's short stories. That review sent me to Gutenberg to see what I could see. I wanted especially to read the story The Remarkable Rocket. And that is how I found this book, which has five short fables and some elegant illustrations by Charles Robinson. The stories included here are The Happy Prince, The Nightingale And The Rose, The Selfish Giant, The Devoted Friend, and The Remarkable Rocket. I was completely charmed by them all. Written in a deceptively simple style that begs for being read aloud, each story is a gold nugget wrapped in layers of silver-tongued wit that any thinking adult will appreciate. Life lessons are there waiting to be unwrapped: the importance of Love, the true value of being unselfish, the power of friendship. I had no idea that Oscar Wilde wrote such stories. I want to read more of them, and get to know the man and his work better. Thank you, Rick! Here is a link to the Gutenberg book I read https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... And here is Rick's review of the book he read; the review that piqued my curiosity more than any school teacher ever could. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Oscar Wilde does fairy tales--a kind of strange mixture. The title story, The Happy Prince, and its successor, The Nightingale and the Rose, are a bit sorrowful and bleak. I dare say the main takeaway might be that love brings death and is much unappreciated. The Selfish Giant is an almost religious tale in which an act of kindness is rewarded...the sort of tale in which the main character does not realize who he is aiding but proves his worth by his unselfish act. The four Oscar Wilde does fairy tales--a kind of strange mixture. The title story, The Happy Prince, and its successor, The Nightingale and the Rose, are a bit sorrowful and bleak. I dare say the main takeaway might be that love brings death and is much unappreciated. The Selfish Giant is an almost religious tale in which an act of kindness is rewarded...the sort of tale in which the main character does not realize who he is aiding but proves his worth by his unselfish act. The fourth story was my favorite. The Devoted Friend is a story of exploitation in the name of friendship and hypocrisy. I could imagine Wilde basing it on his on personal experience. The final story seemed to be a study in pomposity, another subject Wilde knew a bit about. His signature wit surfaced from time to time. After the seven years were over he had said all that he had to say, for his conversation was limited. And ’What is a sensitive person?’ said the Cracker to the Roman Candle. ‘A person who, because he has corns himself, always treads on other people’s toes,’ answered the Roman Candle in a low whisper… The stories are cynical, with Wilde poking fun at himself, society, and possibly Aesop’s Fables. I doubt he would have enjoyed his current reputation if this had been all he had written, but as an addition to his works, they are interesting enough.

  12. 4 out of 5

    pink pills and paper

    This is a collection of five short stories, that are fairy-tale-like moral fables, not only for children, but drenched in subtle hints aimed at the older readers. When questioned about the maturity of the language in his stories, Wilde ridiculed the idea that "extremely limited vocabulary at the disposal of the British child" should be "the standard by which the prose of an artist is to be judged". These tales are dark and colorful at the same time, and deal mostly with sel This is a collection of five short stories, that are fairy-tale-like moral fables, not only for children, but drenched in subtle hints aimed at the older readers. When questioned about the maturity of the language in his stories, Wilde ridiculed the idea that "extremely limited vocabulary at the disposal of the British child" should be "the standard by which the prose of an artist is to be judged". These tales are dark and colorful at the same time, and deal mostly with selfishness, compassion, egotism, Christianity, goodwill and love.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    This book is real gem. A collection of five short stories.Each story beautifully woven around a moral. The stories are simple but evoke strong emotions. Every story may make you happy or make you sad (mostly) but each one will surely touch your heart.Oscar Wilde is a true genius. Highly Recommended !!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Markus

    If this book doesn't make you want to curl up with a nice hot cup of arsenic and maybe some razor blades, you read a different edition than I did. Apparently Wilde read Hans Christian Anderson and thought, "Dang nab it, I can write way way depressing fairy tales, too!" Not saying it's not pretty. Just saying.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Masoud

    A collection of perfect proses containing five short stories (fairytales): • The Happy Prince • The Nightingale and the Rose • The Selfish Giant • The Devoted Friend • The Remarkable Rocket My favorite one is The Happy Prince, which I have read two times and I give it five stars. Even though the stories are full of moral lesson such as self-sacrifice, acts of devotion, but Overall, I think most of the stories are very sad, heart wrenching, and are not suitable as be A collection of perfect proses containing five short stories (fairytales): • The Happy Prince • The Nightingale and the Rose • The Selfish Giant • The Devoted Friend • The Remarkable Rocket My favorite one is The Happy Prince, which I have read two times and I give it five stars. Even though the stories are full of moral lesson such as self-sacrifice, acts of devotion, but Overall, I think most of the stories are very sad, heart wrenching, and are not suitable as bed stories for children. However, for an adult reader who is into children’s literature, it holds a deep pleasure.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    This is a beautiful little collection of stories. I thought I'd never read any of them, but I'd definitely read "The Selfish Giant" before, and some of the others seemed familiar. The stories are all a little like fairy tales, though, so that's probably part of it. My favourites were "The Nightingale and the Rose" and "The Fisherman and His Soul", I think. All of them are lovely, though. I especially like the beginning of Star-Child. Some of the lines in it are gorgeous, like: "And wh This is a beautiful little collection of stories. I thought I'd never read any of them, but I'd definitely read "The Selfish Giant" before, and some of the others seemed familiar. The stories are all a little like fairy tales, though, so that's probably part of it. My favourites were "The Nightingale and the Rose" and "The Fisherman and His Soul", I think. All of them are lovely, though. I especially like the beginning of Star-Child. Some of the lines in it are gorgeous, like: "And when they came to the Mountain-Torrent she was hanging motionless in air, for the Ice-King had kissed her." I remember loving "The Selfish Giant" when I was little: I was very Christian then and the ending, with the Christ imagery, used to make me cry. It's still a lovely image to me now, and I like the last line: "And when the children ran in that afternoon, they found the Giant lying dead under the tree, all covered with white blossoms." These aren't exactly happy stories -- The Happy Prince's heart breaks, the Nightingale dies, the dwarf in The Birthday of the Infanta hates himself, and the Fisherman loses his little Mermaid -- but when you read a lot of old fairy tales you find out that actually, they aren't. I'm glad I picked this up to read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    I do really like Oscar Wilde, so giving this collectiont three stars pains me somewhat. It's not that they aren't well written, they're just incredibly sad and frustrating. "The Devoted Friend", for example, just annoyed me. There are no happy endings and, call me old fashioned, but I think happy endings in children's stories are a necessity. That being said I read "The Selfish Giant" many times as a child. Whether it did me any good or not remains to be seen! From an analytical point I do really like Oscar Wilde, so giving this collectiont three stars pains me somewhat. It's not that they aren't well written, they're just incredibly sad and frustrating. "The Devoted Friend", for example, just annoyed me. There are no happy endings and, call me old fashioned, but I think happy endings in children's stories are a necessity. That being said I read "The Selfish Giant" many times as a child. Whether it did me any good or not remains to be seen! From an analytical point of view I could talk until the cows come home about the religious content, the views of the aristocracy, Wilde's cynicism, the role of women etc etc etc. But the only thing I'm going to say is, they're good, they're not happy and I wouldn't read them to any future children I have, but they're not awful.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Oswald

    Actual rating: 4 stars The Happy Prince: 5 stars The Nightingale and the Rose: 5 stars The Selfish Giant: 4,5 stars The Devoted Friend: 3 stars The Remarkable Rocket: 2,5 stars

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kelly ...

    I understand the charm of fairy tales but never fully engage in them. This book is written by the master, Oscar Wilde, and I think that is the only reason I connected at all. He is an extraordinary writer. Everything he does enhances my assessment of him: he is a genius. My reactions to the nine stories included in this volume were varied. The most succesful: The Happy Prince: 4.5 stars A statue stands in a town where the members of the community stop to marvel at its beauty/>The I understand the charm of fairy tales but never fully engage in them. This book is written by the master, Oscar Wilde, and I think that is the only reason I connected at all. He is an extraordinary writer. Everything he does enhances my assessment of him: he is a genius. My reactions to the nine stories included in this volume were varied. The most succesful: The Happy Prince: 4.5 stars A statue stands in a town where the members of the community stop to marvel at its beauty. But the statue used to be a wealthy prince; an only child. One day a flock of birds is on its way to Egypt for winter when one bird becomes separated from the rest. The bird settles down to sleep at the foot of the statue but finds it is crying! So what becomes of the bird and the prince? I won't tell, but the story is sweet, charming, heartwarming and proves that good deeds do pay off. The Fisherman and his Soul: 4 stars This is the love story of a young man and a young mermaid. He is told that he must leave his soul on earth to live in the sea with her. So, he goes to a witch and asks her to separate his soul from his body. The soul then asks the man for his heart as he is afraid to be separated. Of course the man wants to keep his heart so that he can continue to love the mermaid. The story is a sad one and despite the farfetched nature of fairy tales I found myself engrossed. It made me feel. And the least succesful: The Devoted Friend: 1 star I really hated this story. I didn't find any warm or goodhearted moral in it. In fact, it felt like one "friend" convinced the other to act so far outside his own interests that he died. There was nothing redeeming in this tale.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Wastrel

    Wilde is a fantastic prose stylist, if you can tolerate his style, and this is one of his most accessible works, as well as a surprising one in many ways for those with certain preconceived notions of the author: Wilde here often puts his aesthetic pose second to his political and moral views - two things that 'Oscar Wilde' wasn't meant to have at all. On the other hand, this probably isn't the best demonstration of Wilde's skills. The idea of the arch-sophisticate taking on the genre Wilde is a fantastic prose stylist, if you can tolerate his style, and this is one of his most accessible works, as well as a surprising one in many ways for those with certain preconceived notions of the author: Wilde here often puts his aesthetic pose second to his political and moral views - two things that 'Oscar Wilde' wasn't meant to have at all. On the other hand, this probably isn't the best demonstration of Wilde's skills. The idea of the arch-sophisticate taking on the genre of simple, childlike fairy tales is an intriguing one, and the execution is certainly worth reading (it's only five short stories, after all) - but I don't think Wilde is entirely comfortable with the form. The stories can be too simplistic, and there is a tension between Wilde's desire to tell a story and his desire to show off. The stand-out, "The Nightingale and the Rose" is, however, in my view a brilliant short story, so beautiful it made me cry. Others may find it too sugary or flowery (no pun intended) to stomach. Overall, whether you're interested in fairy tales or in Oscar Wilde or late Victorian literature, this is an interesting curio well worth the time, but one that will probably always be a footnote rather than a must-read work. My much longer and overly biographical review can be found over on my blog (which probably won't work if, like me, you're in the UK, thank you IWF...)

  21. 5 out of 5

    HebatAllah Hassan

    I fell in love with Oscar Wilde's writings ever since I read his "The Nightengale and the Rose" when one of my friends gave it to me saying: "Oh, Heba, read it; it's truly touching." And I was not disappointed; the first time I read it I wept of frustration, I was deeply deeply touched. So, knowing that this story is part of Wilde's "The Happy Prince and Other Tales", I decided to read it as a whole hoping to find stories better, if there can be anything better, or at least at the same level as I fell in love with Oscar Wilde's writings ever since I read his "The Nightengale and the Rose" when one of my friends gave it to me saying: "Oh, Heba, read it; it's truly touching." And I was not disappointed; the first time I read it I wept of frustration, I was deeply deeply touched. So, knowing that this story is part of Wilde's "The Happy Prince and Other Tales", I decided to read it as a whole hoping to find stories better, if there can be anything better, or at least at the same level as "The Nightengale and the Rose", and again, I was not disappointed. But still, my "The Nightengale and the Rose" remains the best; can't actually count how many times I read it aloud. My color of the flower that a lover should present to his beloved was "white", and I used to mock those who favour red roses saying "what do you mean that 'red' shows the passion of love. If so, white would show its purity". But now, I'm completely for red roses; this story added new associations of love to red roses. So, if ever anyone gives me a red rose, I'll keep it always next to my heart, and if it withers I'll keep it safe between the leaves of this book; I won't waste a nightengale's life for no reason. It's so far the best short story I've ever read in the whole of the English literature. Oscar Wilde writes so beautifully that you can't really help but let his books absorb you as though they were Tom Riddle's dairies. He has the Swiftian brilliance of making his tales read as deep touching literature for both children and grown-ups; I'll definitely read it over and over again.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    Short stories with morals, I love that! As always, many thanks Hitessh for the great recommendation!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eman

    The Happy Prince and Other Tales is my first read for Oscar Wilde, and it won't be the last. It's combined of 5 short stories, each story carries a moral at the end of it. I'm not sure if this book is appropriate to be narrated for kids at bedtime, because... (view spoiler)[the stories are not the "and-they-lived-happily-ever-after" type of fairy tales. The endings may be disturbing for the little fellows (hide spoiler)] . How did I like each story? The Happy Prince: 3 stars, liked it. The Happy Prince and Other Tales is my first read for Oscar Wilde, and it won't be the last. It's combined of 5 short stories, each story carries a moral at the end of it. I'm not sure if this book is appropriate to be narrated for kids at bedtime, because... (view spoiler)[the stories are not the "and-they-lived-happily-ever-after" type of fairy tales. The endings may be disturbing for the little fellows (hide spoiler)] . How did I like each story? The Happy Prince: 3 stars, liked it. The Nightingale and the Rose: 4 stars, really really liked it and it was my favorite. The Selfish Giant: 3 stars, liked it. The Devoted Friend: 3 stars, liked it. The Remarkable Rocket: 2 stars, didn't get the moral behind the story but it was OK.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen ⊰✿

    So naturally I only read this as it was written by Wilde, and that is possibly the only reason why it is still in publication because the stories are quite different to contemporary children's tales. Drowning in religion and with very heavy and obvious moral themes, I think readers today prefer a bit more subtlety.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vesna

    The overall rating is just a result of a simple mathematical division. The only rating that really matters is the one for The Happy Prince. And it is a pure 5 stars! I have read The Happy Price countless times and cried my eyes out again and again. But I would/will do it again, it's worth the pain! As for the other stories , I encountered them for the first time. My ratings go like this: The Happy Prince ***** Infinitely sad, infinitely perfect. Ultimate sacrifice made for the good of others/>The The overall rating is just a result of a simple mathematical division. The only rating that really matters is the one for The Happy Prince. And it is a pure 5 stars! I have read The Happy Price countless times and cried my eyes out again and again. But I would/will do it again, it's worth the pain! As for the other stories , I encountered them for the first time. My ratings go like this: The Happy Prince ***** Infinitely sad, infinitely perfect. Ultimate sacrifice made for the good of others, repaid in another life. The Nightingale and the Rose **** Almost as beautiful. Reminded me of The Thorn Birds (what a blast from the past; go figure...) The Selfish Giant *** The selfish giant won't allow village children to play in his beautiful garden. Gets punished for it. Realizes his mistake an make amends. All ends well. The Devoted Friend ** Sacrifice to the point of stupidity. And for what? For whom? The Remarkable Rocket ** The dialogues were great, the story pretty much ordinary. The Young King *** An orphan young shepherd ends up the heir to the throne. He is instantly enchanted by his new way of life, his palace, his clothes. Only after a series of dreams does he realize life outside the wealth of his castle is excruciatingly hard and painful. Which makes no sense because he lived that same life for fourteen years! Anyway, he renounces his wealth and is crowned as King in his shepherd's outfit, holding a wooden stick an wearing a crown of branches. At points, it sounded more like a Sunday school moral story, than a fairy tale. The Birthday of the Infanta * Infanta is inconsiderate and spoiled little bitch. End of story. The Fisherman and his Soul **** Tough to judge. A story of the power of love with a not so happy ending? Again, Christian influence is extremely strong, but overall I liked the story very much. The Star-Child **** Beautiful premise and amazing writing at the beginning. A Star-Child fell from the sky wrapped in a cloak of gold embedded with stars and chain of amber around his neck. The rest of the story follows the predicable pattern; a happy ending after the child (now a young man) repents for his sins and rights his wrongs. I'm repeating myself but: strong Christian influence. Being a Christian myself it didn't exactly bother me, but annoyed me a little because it's not what I've bargained far. I wanted fairy tales, as simple as that.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Wilde was rather an interesting writer. He wrote about society and manners, and he wrote about morality and the pitfalls relating to that. He combines all of that in these stories. Surprisingly, they're also quite religious, which I wasn't expecting. Some really sweet morality tales here. The Selfish Giant, The Young King, and The Happy Prince stand out for me. I don't particularly care for morality to be linked with religion, though, so I think that's why my rating isn't higher. Wilde was rather an interesting writer. He wrote about society and manners, and he wrote about morality and the pitfalls relating to that. He combines all of that in these stories. Surprisingly, they're also quite religious, which I wasn't expecting. Some really sweet morality tales here. The Selfish Giant, The Young King, and The Happy Prince stand out for me. I don't particularly care for morality to be linked with religion, though, so I think that's why my rating isn't higher. Some very sad stories here too. The Nightingale and the Rose and The Birthday of the Infanta struck me particularly. These stories don't necessarily have happy endings, or they only come after a lot of suffering. Wilde didn't shy away from how hard the world can be. I think his stories are probably a bit like Hans Christian Andersen's in that. Definitely an interesting collection. Wilde had a lot to say about how hard life can be, and what we can do to make it easier. His sense of morality gets overshadowed by his reputation a lot, so it's good that these stories exist to rebalance the view.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marple

    This book contains six short stories and my favorites were the remarkable rocket , the devoted friend and the happy price. The happy Prince The young king The selfish giant The remarkable rocket The nightingale and the rose The devoted friend Very nice collection of short stories that fulfills entertainment and wise message to the young folks. I always read children's books and I can distinguish the good ones from the ordinary. And this one is absolut/>The This book contains six short stories and my favorites were the remarkable rocket , the devoted friend and the happy price. The happy Prince The young king The selfish giant The remarkable rocket The nightingale and the rose The devoted friend Very nice collection of short stories that fulfills entertainment and wise message to the young folks. I always read children's books and I can distinguish the good ones from the ordinary. And this one is absolutely one of my favorite. I will start translating it to Arabic as soon as possible. I highly recommend it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    I hated that. I guess these are fairytale satires? They're just so depressing and not in a cathartic The Little Prince sort of way. I made it through 5 seasons of the Walking Dead before i felt as worn out as i did after reading the Devoted Friend :# . Also, i still don't get Wildes writing, having now read this and Dorian Gray i can't say i see anything special about it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hoda هدى

    All these stories felt so real and authentic. They just reminded me how skillful Oscar Wilde is.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hafsa Sabira

    While growing up, I unknowingly read many Oscar Wilde stories without knowing the name of the writer. The stories were includes in the English for Today board book and in the test papers for comprehensive parts. Even though I enjoyed the stories with intertwined simplicity and moral lessons, I didn't know the artist who depicted them so well. After discovering this book and going through the pages as slowly as possible, I couldn't help but wonder how much efficiency does one possess t While growing up, I unknowingly read many Oscar Wilde stories without knowing the name of the writer. The stories were includes in the English for Today board book and in the test papers for comprehensive parts. Even though I enjoyed the stories with intertwined simplicity and moral lessons, I didn't know the artist who depicted them so well. After discovering this book and going through the pages as slowly as possible, I couldn't help but wonder how much efficiency does one possess to write stories for children with this much amount of moral lessons inside? I grew up reading Aesop, but Oscar Wilde is no less than him when it comes to spinning tales with multiple layered meanings inside them.

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