Hot Best Seller

Tyrant

Availability: Ready to download

Introducing Kineas, Srayanka, and their world—a world that Alexander is busy conquering A well-born Athenian cavalry officer, Kineas fought shoulder to shoulder with Alexander in his epic battles against the Persian hordes. But when he returns to his native city, he finds not glory but shame—and exile. With nothing to his name but his military skills, Kineas agrees to lead Introducing Kineas, Srayanka, and their world—a world that Alexander is busy conquering A well-born Athenian cavalry officer, Kineas fought shoulder to shoulder with Alexander in his epic battles against the Persian hordes. But when he returns to his native city, he finds not glory but shame—and exile. With nothing to his name but his military skills, Kineas agrees to lead a band of veterans to the city of Olbia, where the Tyrant is offering good money to train the city's elite cavalry. But soon Kineas and his men find they have stumbled into a deadly maze of intrigue and conspiracy as the Tyrant plots to use them as pawns in increasingly complex power games between his own citizens and the dread military might of Macedon. Caught between his duty to the Tyrant, his loyalty to his men, and a forbidden love affair with a charismatic Scythian noblewoman, Kineas must call on all his Athenian guile, his flair on the battlefield, and even—he is convinced—the intervention of the gods, to survive. Includes a glossary.


Compare

Introducing Kineas, Srayanka, and their world—a world that Alexander is busy conquering A well-born Athenian cavalry officer, Kineas fought shoulder to shoulder with Alexander in his epic battles against the Persian hordes. But when he returns to his native city, he finds not glory but shame—and exile. With nothing to his name but his military skills, Kineas agrees to lead Introducing Kineas, Srayanka, and their world—a world that Alexander is busy conquering A well-born Athenian cavalry officer, Kineas fought shoulder to shoulder with Alexander in his epic battles against the Persian hordes. But when he returns to his native city, he finds not glory but shame—and exile. With nothing to his name but his military skills, Kineas agrees to lead a band of veterans to the city of Olbia, where the Tyrant is offering good money to train the city's elite cavalry. But soon Kineas and his men find they have stumbled into a deadly maze of intrigue and conspiracy as the Tyrant plots to use them as pawns in increasingly complex power games between his own citizens and the dread military might of Macedon. Caught between his duty to the Tyrant, his loyalty to his men, and a forbidden love affair with a charismatic Scythian noblewoman, Kineas must call on all his Athenian guile, his flair on the battlefield, and even—he is convinced—the intervention of the gods, to survive. Includes a glossary.

30 review for Tyrant

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Matt

    Kineas is an Athenian mercenary back from fighting with Alexander in Asia Minor and Persia. He is hired by the Tyrant of Olbia, a city on the Black Sea. On the surface it looks as if he is to train the city's cavalry to better defend against the Steppe nomads. Instead, Kineas and his companions find themselves webbed in a net of plots where their fate is poised on the edge as they cope with treachery in Olbia and an invasion of a Macedonian army. This book started out too slowly for my taste. I t Kineas is an Athenian mercenary back from fighting with Alexander in Asia Minor and Persia. He is hired by the Tyrant of Olbia, a city on the Black Sea. On the surface it looks as if he is to train the city's cavalry to better defend against the Steppe nomads. Instead, Kineas and his companions find themselves webbed in a net of plots where their fate is poised on the edge as they cope with treachery in Olbia and an invasion of a Macedonian army. This book started out too slowly for my taste. I think this is a trait of the author. I've read a number of his books and more than a few feel this way. Part of this, I think, is the author's dedication to immersion and authenticity. He wants his readers to experience the world of Alexander and the Greeks (or whatever he is writing about). When Kineas treks north out of the Greek lands, across Thrace, over the Danube, and finally makes it to Olbia, he wanted his reader to understand just what an epic trek that was. It was a long, arduous journey filled with danger - not a jaunt down the highway. I like the immersion, but it makes for a longer story - and it's very different from more action oriented historical fiction of Cornwell and Scarrow. It requires a bit more of a commitment from the reader. The author also included a "what is it all for" moment in the book that I thought was well done. Kineas, Ajax, Philokles, and the other companions are seated around a fire after the younger Olbian's first blooding, and they discuss the meaning of the contest. It was a nice touch, and I don't think he was projecting today's morality on a pre-modern world. I suspect men (and women) of any era who face the horror of savage combat (and it was incredibly savage - hand-to-hand, face-to-face) wonder if it is worth it. It adds to the overall immersion. Three and a half stars rounded down to three. I like the immersion and realism. The final battle was truly epic. I didn't really care for the mystic side of things - Kineas' dreams and Kam Bacqa (?). I don't want magic in my historical fiction. Mysticism, sure; magic, no. I thought the book crossed a line there. Also, the relationship with the Scythian woman seemed a bit unreal to me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ben Kane

    I bought this book when it came out in 2008. It's the story of my life that I buy more books than I can read, and it languished in the 'To Be Read' pile for 4 years. More and more people began to tell me how good an author Cameron was, however, so I tackled it in the summer of 2012. I was astonished by how good it was, and devoured it in 3 or 4 days. To say that it's well written is an understatement of the greatest kind. Cameron is a reenactor, and has therefore spent many an hour, and day, wear I bought this book when it came out in 2008. It's the story of my life that I buy more books than I can read, and it languished in the 'To Be Read' pile for 4 years. More and more people began to tell me how good an author Cameron was, however, so I tackled it in the summer of 2012. I was astonished by how good it was, and devoured it in 3 or 4 days. To say that it's well written is an understatement of the greatest kind. Cameron is a reenactor, and has therefore spent many an hour, and day, wearing and using the kit of a Greek soldier of the 4th century BC. He's also spent considerable time learning ancient Greek, and reading all the sources that he can lay his hands on. Boy, does it show. Kineas, the main character, reeks of authenticity. So too do the people he encounters: his friends and enemies, and the world that they all inhabit. Rarely have I been so transported to another place, another world. I lived with Kineas and his comrades for every moment that I read this book. I could not wait to buy the sequel, and over the last 12 months, I have read three of the four others in the series. It's a benefit of not having read them as they were published, I suppose, but I will be sorry to come to the end of Tyrant: Destroyer Of Cities. At least I will have the Long War series to read then, however! If you haven't read any of Cameron's books, I suggest that you start now. He stands head and shoulders above most authors out there, and is now one of my favourite writers. If I could award this book more than five stars, I would.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Liviu

    Very entertaining novel set on the Black Sea cca 330 BC; it is less of a "blood and guts" novel than I expected though it has its fair share of battles, but it has intrigue, strange cultures, discussions on the nature and meaning of war and it reads very "classical", no real discordant (ie modern sensibility) notes that are encountered so often in historical fiction today. Bought and started to read the sequel too and book 3 is an asap when it will be published; I plan to do a full review of th Very entertaining novel set on the Black Sea cca 330 BC; it is less of a "blood and guts" novel than I expected though it has its fair share of battles, but it has intrigue, strange cultures, discussions on the nature and meaning of war and it reads very "classical", no real discordant (ie modern sensibility) notes that are encountered so often in historical fiction today. Bought and started to read the sequel too and book 3 is an asap when it will be published; I plan to do a full review of the series in early 2010, but for now I have to say it is one of the superior novels in the sub-genre

  4. 4 out of 5

    Reggie Kray

    No one writes epic battle scenes better than Mr. Cameron. In any genre. And thank the fucking gods for Tums. 😊

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beorn

    It's all the indication you need of your feelings on a book when you have to repeatedly convince yourself to cast your apathy aside and continue reading. This is very much a soldiers book, or more specifically an officers book. By that, I mean it feels very much written by a former soldier for soldiers and anyone else will just have toe the line. Normally this approach can sometimes work, if the characterisation is rich enough to make you see each character as a real human being first and a soldie It's all the indication you need of your feelings on a book when you have to repeatedly convince yourself to cast your apathy aside and continue reading. This is very much a soldiers book, or more specifically an officers book. By that, I mean it feels very much written by a former soldier for soldiers and anyone else will just have toe the line. Normally this approach can sometimes work, if the characterisation is rich enough to make you see each character as a real human being first and a soldier second, as in say Anthony Riches' books. In this book however, and from what I've seen of Cameron's work , in his other books too, the emphasis is very much more on the structured regimental aspect of life, often at the cost of the human side. It's this lack of depth to human side of the characterisation that leaves you apathetic to what happens to any of the characters. Strangely, a number of the barbarians/slaves seem to talk either like Borat or like some strange Yosemite Sam style prospector.... Another way in which the potential of this book is stifled is the logistical side. The author has a seeming love of using obscure terms that you are just automatically assumed to know. The glossary only serves the bare minimum and doesn't cover the majority of the random terms the author smugly inserts every so often for no reason. On top of which there are no maps or information, beyond the authors note right at the end of the book, on the land in which the main story takes place. In a book where the location & geography are fairly important and there is a key siege at the hub of the story, this is a sad oversight. I've heard numerous positive things around this series and author from various other lovers of historical fiction, but frankly, his other books will have to seriously up their game for me to try again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lucinda

    Bloodthirsty, atmospheric and impressive I was astonished by how spectacular Tyrant was. Christian Cameron’s series begins with book one Tyrant, about a well-born officer of the Athenian cavalry called Kineas. Kineas fought shoulder to shoulder with Alexander in his epic battles against the Persian hordes, but when he returns to his native city he soon finds not glory but ignominy. All veterans of the Boy King's campaigns have been sent into exile. With nothing to his name but his military skill Bloodthirsty, atmospheric and impressive I was astonished by how spectacular Tyrant was. Christian Cameron’s series begins with book one Tyrant, about a well-born officer of the Athenian cavalry called Kineas. Kineas fought shoulder to shoulder with Alexander in his epic battles against the Persian hordes, but when he returns to his native city he soon finds not glory but ignominy. All veterans of the Boy King's campaigns have been sent into exile. With nothing to his name but his military skills, Kineas has no choice but to become a mercenary and soon accepts a commission to soldier for the Tyrant of Olbia (a wealthy city on the Black Sea). But when he reaches Olbia he finds that he and his tight-knit band of Athenians have stumbled into a deadly maze of intrigue and conspiracy, as the Tyrant plots to use them as a pawn in the increasingly complex power games between his own citizens; the so-called barbarians of the encroaching Scythian plains and the dread military might of Macedon. Caught between his duty to the Tyrant, his loyalty to his men and a forbidden love affair with a charismatic Scythian noblewoman, Kineas must call on all his Athenian guile and his flair on the battlefield, and even - he is convinced - the intervention of the gods, to survive. Kineas of Athens is a character based loosely on Plutarch’s Phocion, with some input from G.T. Griffith’s comments on Leosthenes of Athens that makes him so realistic and beliveable. Raised like any gentleman in Athens, Kineas learned to farm and to ride from a young age, took part in athletics, hunted rabbits with his father’s friends, failed to qualify for the Olympics as a boxer, and studied at the Academy first under Plato himself (until 347 BC) and then under his nephew Speusippus. Another main character is Srayanka (Cruel Hands) who is based loosely on a number of artistic and literary depictions of Scythian women in contact with Greek society, most particularly with the character of Medea in Euripides play of that name. She is a war leader and a priestess, two roles that could be combined in Scythian society, and whatever her sexuality, she has chosen to remain a warrior. This book has to be one of the most thrilling, intensly gripping and exciting reads of its genre, that totally shocked me from the moment that I opened the first page. With the noticable cover leaving me feeling slightly unsure of whether to read this or not, I tentively took the bold step of reading a few pages and never looked back! I lost myself within a bloodthirsty saga full of social hieracy, intregues and plotting, epic battle scenes and just a vivid look of what it would have been like at that time. I love Rome and stories that encompass all the might and magnificence of the time, with Christian Cameron as an author at the very top of my list, next to other great writers such as Conn Iggulden or Steven Saylor. I was just so overwhelmed and impressed by this tale that really did think (from reading the blurb and observing the cover) was not for me, so to be proved so wrong and my judgement poor was a treat and a delight. It was about fighting and honor, loyalty and bravery with such remarkable and interesting characters as to make the plot even more intreguing, as you are sent back in time to one of the greatest ages within history. I loved Kineas and his struggle to overcome all the setbacks and dificulties that came his way, whilst remaining loyal to those he trusted and true to those indaviduals he loved. I am now a huge fan and aficionardo of Christian Cameron and very much look forward to reading the other three installments within this magnificent and mighty series, which I urge you to read. It is AMAZING!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sonic

    Kineas, Ajax, Crax, Diodorus, and Niceas left their kingdom in Athens because they thought that someone from another kingdom poisoned their king. When they arrived they found out who might have poisoned their king. When the kingdom found out that they were from there kingdom who was their enemy. So they were chased out of the kingdom and went to the other kingdom. They headed through the mountains to the man who poisoned their king. It was getting dark so they camped out on a cliff. While sleepi Kineas, Ajax, Crax, Diodorus, and Niceas left their kingdom in Athens because they thought that someone from another kingdom poisoned their king. When they arrived they found out who might have poisoned their king. When the kingdom found out that they were from there kingdom who was their enemy. So they were chased out of the kingdom and went to the other kingdom. They headed through the mountains to the man who poisoned their king. It was getting dark so they camped out on a cliff. While sleeping Kineas was screaming in his sleep which almost gave away their position. They found the killer of their king in their own kingdom. It’s been about three weeks since they got vengeance for their king. Now they have a new king and everything is back to normal. The kingdom is having more parties than they used to. The new king asked Kineas to go around and put together an army. Kineas wondered way but did not argue.Once they got their army together they had to fight the Persians. The battle was gruesome and intense. After the battle the kingdom was a disaster but the people still partied. Kineas finally found the love of his dreams. Everyone else went on with their life.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    c2008:FWFTB: heroism, Persia, cavalry, mercenaries, Scythian. Extraordinarily well written battle scenes. I felt, at times, that I was watching a movie rather than reading a book. Some really stirring passages and characters and Kineas is now a firm favourite. But, where was a map and a glossary, when I needed it? Not only has this book whetted my appetite for the next one in the series but I have been spurred on to do some further investigation on the period and places of the era (ie 333BC). Ev c2008:FWFTB: heroism, Persia, cavalry, mercenaries, Scythian. Extraordinarily well written battle scenes. I felt, at times, that I was watching a movie rather than reading a book. Some really stirring passages and characters and Kineas is now a firm favourite. But, where was a map and a glossary, when I needed it? Not only has this book whetted my appetite for the next one in the series but I have been spurred on to do some further investigation on the period and places of the era (ie 333BC). Even better, Mr Cameron has a connection to Iowa City Go Hawks Loved it and highly recommended to the normal crew. FCN: Kineas, Ataelus, Ajax, Philokles, Diodorus. "Kineas had his breast and back plate fastened, his helmet locked and the hinged cheek pieces down, and was trying to get control of his charger, who was not having any of it."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    I'm a sucker for ancient history, especially around the Mediterranean, so yeah. The author seems to have done some solid research on the Greeks and neighboring cultures of that time, and it shows. I'm a total fanboy for the Greeks but the depiction of the 'barbarian' nomadic tribes was just as interesting and cool, especially the role of women like Srayanka and of shamanic beliefs. Oh yeah, and it was a solid story that held my attention. I think I read all three books of the trilogy one after t I'm a sucker for ancient history, especially around the Mediterranean, so yeah. The author seems to have done some solid research on the Greeks and neighboring cultures of that time, and it shows. I'm a total fanboy for the Greeks but the depiction of the 'barbarian' nomadic tribes was just as interesting and cool, especially the role of women like Srayanka and of shamanic beliefs. Oh yeah, and it was a solid story that held my attention. I think I read all three books of the trilogy one after the other.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katrin

    This story started interesting and was so throughout. There was not always fighting but still it kept you glued to the book. I liked the characters very much. The thing that I didn't like was in the second part of the book when there I almost too much tactical stuff. I get tired of that quickly and in the end it annoyed me a bit. The story otherwise is very thrilling. I didn't know about the greek mercenaries and how even war heroes were exiled. This was entertaining enough but could have been b This story started interesting and was so throughout. There was not always fighting but still it kept you glued to the book. I liked the characters very much. The thing that I didn't like was in the second part of the book when there I almost too much tactical stuff. I get tired of that quickly and in the end it annoyed me a bit. The story otherwise is very thrilling. I didn't know about the greek mercenaries and how even war heroes were exiled. This was entertaining enough but could have been better even.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stefan

    Tyrant was a surprisingly good historical novel about the ancient world, which was gripping and historically interesting. I have not read much historical fiction set in ancient Greece and so this novel was pleasantly different. The battle sequences were exciting, vivid, and interesting. The author did a good job at weaving tragedy, triumph, happiness, and friendship together with the interesting setting and well-developed characters. A excellent novel, and one that makes me look forward to readi Tyrant was a surprisingly good historical novel about the ancient world, which was gripping and historically interesting. I have not read much historical fiction set in ancient Greece and so this novel was pleasantly different. The battle sequences were exciting, vivid, and interesting. The author did a good job at weaving tragedy, triumph, happiness, and friendship together with the interesting setting and well-developed characters. A excellent novel, and one that makes me look forward to reading the sequel.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Guille Puerto

    To me a piece of fine historical fiction. Great detail, a touch of fantasy, and vivid description of the battles. But it lacks a bit in the character development area, and the rythm was not of my liking. I would have definitely liked it better if it was a bit longer, as it has a three month jump to a fast conclusion at the end. Also I kind of hoped for a shocking gay love scene that never came.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    This book took me a really long time to get into. It wasn't until about half-way that I really started liking it. Up to that point it was OK; I kept reading more because of the subject matter of a time period that really interests me. In the end, I stuck to it until the end and I'm glad I did. So, I liked it but not enough to give it more than 3 stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fenella Miller

    I have just discovered Christian Cameron and can't believe I didn't know about him before this. Tyrant is superbly crafted, perfectly researched with well drawn characters that I really cared about.I read it in two evenings – it's the sort of book you just can't put down even when it's after midnight.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carlton

    This book brought the 4th century BC Scythians alive in my mind. Sort of like an advanced Native American Plains Culture, one that allowed women to become warriors and chiefs. The depiction of the Euxine Greeks, and their Sythian allies, standing against the Macedonian conquest,was unique.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Boyd

    Well researched, well written, interesting take on the Scythians. I liked it enough to purchase his Tyrant II: Storm of Arrows.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Clay Kallam

    I stumbled into this six-book series by way of one of my favorite recent fantasy series, the Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron. I noticed that, for some unknown reason, Cameron also wrote under the name of Christian Cameron, and had a series set in the time of Alexander the Great. As one who knows way too much about that Hellenistic time period, and one who loved Cameron’s previous work, I was all in from the moment I started volume one, Tyrant. And as this is a connected series that really need I stumbled into this six-book series by way of one of my favorite recent fantasy series, the Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron. I noticed that, for some unknown reason, Cameron also wrote under the name of Christian Cameron, and had a series set in the time of Alexander the Great. As one who knows way too much about that Hellenistic time period, and one who loved Cameron’s previous work, I was all in from the moment I started volume one, Tyrant. And as this is a connected series that really needs to be read in order to be appreciated, this review is of all six books considered as a whole, rather than a review of each book (though parenthetical notes will be appended for each). The story covers about 30 years of ancient history, ending in 301 BCE at the Battle of Ipsos. Now if you already know who won the Battle of Ipsos, you will be a little too far ahead of the game, for much of the suspense of the series (which includes other historical events) will be lost – and you will also be surprised by some revisions Cameron makes in order to tell the story the way he wants to. But the basic premise is this: Cameron inserts fictional, high-ranking characters into the complicated weave of Hellenistic history, and has them participate in events both major and minor. For the most part, this works extremely well, as Cameron’s grasp of the minutiae of Hellenistic life and his gritty sense of the bloody, painful and horrific cost of ancient warfare is superb. He is also an excellent writer, so the story moves along at a brisk pace, flagging only momentarily in the later volumes. There are issues, of course. Like Star Trek, Kineas and Satyrus, the two main protagonists, are in the front lines way too often to be believed, especially in the later books, and their interactions with the major historical figures seem unnecessary, as if the editors insisted that somehow Kineas and Alexander are in contact, and so are Satyrus and various Hellenistic leaders. Cameron, though, is perfectly willing to kill off major characters, and in sudden and unexpected ways, which adds a tremendous amount of tension to battle scenes and assassination attempts (unlike Star Trek). There’s also some magical realism thrown in, but any attempt to explain the plot would require much more patience than any reader of this review is likely to have. But in short, Kineas, Satyrus and his woefully underutilized twin sister Melitta (why wasn’t she more prominent in the narrative?), all represent what we now consider Southern Russia, at the north of what we call the Black Sea. In those times, it was the place where the steppe nomads and expanding population of farmers and colonizers crossed paths, and it became a crucial part of the Hellenistic game of thrones given its ability to produce grain that the Mediterranean cities desperately needed to feed their people. So Cameron tosses these characters, their soldiers and their grain into the Hellenistic mix, and in the end, comes up with a wonderful series that I enjoyed from start to finish. Then again, I love excellent historical fiction, and this is my favorite period, so I’m hardly unbiased. But I will say this: If you have even a passing interest in the world of Alexander the Great after his death, the Tyrant series is for you. I just wish there were more than six volumes. * * * * * This first volume is especially good because Cameron does a great job of creating a fictional dream of Hellenistic times. His grasp of detail, his strong characters and the sheer pleasure of discovering the series makes it perhaps the best. Which is a long way of saying if you don't like "Tyrant," go no further.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jane Halliday

    This is the first historical fiction novel I've tried in a while. I'm not going to complain about how accurate facts are because not only this is fiction, but I do not have sufficient control of History to do it. I do want to complain about just how bad this plot is. Well, I may have exaggerated a bit. It's not extremely bad, it's just... uninteresting. The book starts off slow. Really. Slow. It was constant pain for me to keep reading, until I was more or less a hundred pages in, and only becau This is the first historical fiction novel I've tried in a while. I'm not going to complain about how accurate facts are because not only this is fiction, but I do not have sufficient control of History to do it. I do want to complain about just how bad this plot is. Well, I may have exaggerated a bit. It's not extremely bad, it's just... uninteresting. The book starts off slow. Really. Slow. It was constant pain for me to keep reading, until I was more or less a hundred pages in, and only because that's when stuff finally starts getting somewhere. In other words, the first 100 pages are fillers with a bit of plot because the author presents some characters and describes the setting. When the book takes off, that is to say, when the main character finally gets hired by a tyrant, you'd think the story would move smoother, and in a way, it does, but from that point it's a constant journey through gaping plot holes and ridiculous decisions. This tyrant, seriously? His character doesn't make sense, it's like he's ruled by the whims of a three-year-old. It unnerves me. At some points of the novel, it feels like the author is forcing stuff to happen in a very tight fit, which makes it feel awkward, unnatural, and breaks immersion. Beyond that, the book focuses heavily on the military side of the story, which isn't a bad thing in my book, but I wish it had a bit more of depth to it. We see the daily side of an army but... I'm lacking something to make it come alive for me, maybe this is just personal preference. The romance depicted in this story is shallow, at best, but still better than some stories I've had the bad luck of reading. Could have been better, but I'm glad it isn't worse. The ending, don't even get me started on that. It's not just the fact that it's predictable to the core, to the last detail, but it's also... plain, boring. It did not stir up any emotion, at least for me. Halfway through the story, the only motivation that kept me going was to find out about the end and then that turned out to be disappointing. Anyway, I'm not going to continue the saga, because it's not going to be pleasant for me. I might check out the sequel eventually if I'm suddenly curious, but it won't be anytime soon.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Clemens Schoonderwoert

    Being a great fan for some time of the "Killer of Men/Long War" series, I've decided to give the "Tyrant" series a go as well, and this book Tyrant has certainly thrilled me to bits. Just like the "Killer of Men" series the storytelling is of an absolute top-quality, and thus bringing vividly to life the Ancient Greeks within this wonderful book. As far as possible the book has been thoroughly researched historically, and the details provided in this book are of a very clear definition. The book st Being a great fan for some time of the "Killer of Men/Long War" series, I've decided to give the "Tyrant" series a go as well, and this book Tyrant has certainly thrilled me to bits. Just like the "Killer of Men" series the storytelling is of an absolute top-quality, and thus bringing vividly to life the Ancient Greeks within this wonderful book. As far as possible the book has been thoroughly researched historically, and the details provided in this book are of a very clear definition. The book starts off in the year 333 BC when Kineas and his Athenian Cavalry comrades are leaving Alexander the Great's army after a hard fought battle against the Persians, and so finally they are going back home to Athens. Once there Kineas finds out that his father is dead and he himself has been exiled for serving, as an Athenian, Alexander the Great Macedonian army, and he will finally end up along with some of his Athenian veterans on the Euxine, in Olbia to be exact. In Olbia Kineas and his Athenians are hired by the Tyrant to train the city's elite cavalry, only to find out soon enough that they are being used as pawns in the Tyrant's schemes, and so after first fighting with the Macedonians, Kineas now has to fight with Olbia and their unpredictable Scythian allies against the might of Macedon, for gold and grain. What will unfold is a thrilling and gripping story which keeps you spellbound from start to finish, and with great interaction and with hard fought battle scenes in which Kineas and his allies have to fight for their lives against the mighty Macedonians in a Greek world in turmoil. Fully recommended, because this book of this particular series is "A Marvellous Opener"!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tiberiu Pana

    Being a Romanian, I was very pleasantly surprised to find some of the action in this book taking place near the Romanian Black Sea coast, where the Greek of old founded several colonies. My surprise was short lived though as the main action takes place further North, in today's Ukraine. Still though, a welcoming change of scenery. My perfect 5-star reference is the Troy trilogy written by Mr. Gemmell. This book doesn't quite come close to that perfection. The first half of the book is rather dull Being a Romanian, I was very pleasantly surprised to find some of the action in this book taking place near the Romanian Black Sea coast, where the Greek of old founded several colonies. My surprise was short lived though as the main action takes place further North, in today's Ukraine. Still though, a welcoming change of scenery. My perfect 5-star reference is the Troy trilogy written by Mr. Gemmell. This book doesn't quite come close to that perfection. The first half of the book is rather dull and boring due to the fact that I couldn't find any of the characters interesting and neither the dialogues between them...and speaking of the characters, there are a lot of them and I just gave up remembering half of them as they keep appearing and disappearing from the story with no focus on them whatsoever. The story gets interesting when the scythians are introduced and a love affair begins to evolve between the Greek commander and the barbarian princess. From here onward the story picks up the pace and delivers it's goods by the end....but the end, well, it just took the appeal of the book back to square 1. It was a good read overall, but honestly I don't know if I want to read the whole saga. This first book didn't quite convinced me to read another 5 that might be like this one when there are plenty of other choices out there.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I like that this one is set in Alexander the Great's era, but doesn't follow the usual retelling of his story (which most historical fiction readers likely already know off by heart anyway). Instead, we focus on Kineas, an Athenian by birth, who fought with Alexander only to be sent home abruptly to an Athens which promptly exiles him. He finds employment in a place called Olbia, where the leader seems a bit disreputable, but is willing to pay Kineas to train his forces. Said forces are mainly s I like that this one is set in Alexander the Great's era, but doesn't follow the usual retelling of his story (which most historical fiction readers likely already know off by heart anyway). Instead, we focus on Kineas, an Athenian by birth, who fought with Alexander only to be sent home abruptly to an Athens which promptly exiles him. He finds employment in a place called Olbia, where the leader seems a bit disreputable, but is willing to pay Kineas to train his forces. Said forces are mainly spoilt rich men of the sort who expect their slaves to do everything and don't seriously think they'll ever need to fight. Then rumours start that part of Alexander's army is on it's way... I like that we get a good sense of the main characters, we spend plenty of time getting to know their psychology - something Cameron specialises in. We see the realism of Kineas contrasted with idealistic young Ajax whose knowledge of war comes solely from heroic epic poems. There is also the contrast between the city-dwellers from the Greek states and the nomadic Sakje. The battle scenes are detailed and feel well-researched, or at least as far as ancient battles can be. It would have been nice to have a map to help with locations - perhaps that was added for other editions? This paperback edition does also have a few typos, but overall I enjoyed it and will look for the next in the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    James Casey

    Did I enjoy this book? Well,.......Yes and No,......I’m not quite sure. There were times when I was about to put it down, but then I thought, ‘no, I'll just read a bit more’ and that is how I came to finish it. The characters were good, they were all different, but none of them really stood out. The main character (Kineas) who was apparently this great and revered soldier and looked up to by all his comrades, to me, seemed always indecisive and looked to others for help and the ‘Tyrant’ who hire Did I enjoy this book? Well,.......Yes and No,......I’m not quite sure. There were times when I was about to put it down, but then I thought, ‘no, I'll just read a bit more’ and that is how I came to finish it. The characters were good, they were all different, but none of them really stood out. The main character (Kineas) who was apparently this great and revered soldier and looked up to by all his comrades, to me, seemed always indecisive and looked to others for help and the ‘Tyrant’ who hired him to do battle for him, had no confidence in him and was always worried that he would be betrayed by Kineas. There was lots of talk about what was going to happen and what had happened, that when it came to fights or battle scenes, they were just glibbed over in a few sentences or small paragraphs ie, swords were drawn, spears were thrown, arrows flew, men died, horses were wounded, the enemy fled and they all went back to their tents, nursed their wounds and drank some wine. Not in those words but you get what I mean. I expected more from an author who I have read before, but there again I read it to the end, gave it a 4 (really 3.5) and will probably read the next one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    This is one of the better ancient historical fiction novels I've read in recent years, but it's still pretty rough around the edges. The historicity of the novel is fairly impressive, and the setting (on the coast of the Euxine during Alexander's conquests) is an excellent choice. That said, the writing is pretty lacking when it comes to descriptions and transitions, and there are way too many unmemorable ancillary characters. Hints of interesting political intrigue when the main character first This is one of the better ancient historical fiction novels I've read in recent years, but it's still pretty rough around the edges. The historicity of the novel is fairly impressive, and the setting (on the coast of the Euxine during Alexander's conquests) is an excellent choice. That said, the writing is pretty lacking when it comes to descriptions and transitions, and there are way too many unmemorable ancillary characters. Hints of interesting political intrigue when the main character first gets to Olbia prove false as the reader is instead subjected to long scenes of musters and battles--and the problem with that is that Cameron's battle depictions are merely "alright." Also, while a glossary is presented to the reader, maps of the region/final battle are notably lacking, and I can only imagine how difficult this would make the book for readers who DON'T know where Olbia, Pantecapaeum, etc are off the tops of their heads. Between the lack of maps and abrupt transitions, I had no idea which river the final battle was being fought on, for example. That said, this is solid read overall in the genre of ancient historical military fiction.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brent Morrison

    Loved this book. I have always been very interested in the Scythian/Sarmatian/Saka world, they get so little attention considering they once "ruled" an area far larger than most empires ever were. Plus they were in many ways likely our ancestors, if you are of Northern European ancestry, being some of the original "aryan" tribes, or Indo_Europeans if you prefer. It's also likely true that they did stop Alexander the Butcher from ever going onto the steppes, and that alone makes me like them. I a Loved this book. I have always been very interested in the Scythian/Sarmatian/Saka world, they get so little attention considering they once "ruled" an area far larger than most empires ever were. Plus they were in many ways likely our ancestors, if you are of Northern European ancestry, being some of the original "aryan" tribes, or Indo_Europeans if you prefer. It's also likely true that they did stop Alexander the Butcher from ever going onto the steppes, and that alone makes me like them. I am not a big fan of how History with a capital H has treated the entire human story, turning into heroes so many outright sociopaths and murderers, softening the spin on the mayhem of organized religions and the nuts responsible for them, and so on. It's no secret why you can find pages of quotes about history being nothing but lies. Anyhow, nice to see the Scythians get a major part in a series for a change, looking forward to the other five novels.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kd

    Great for a new author Since I'd read Cameron's later worj before starting this series, I wondered what the quality level would be, while still expecting early glimpses of his ebullient writing style. All said, this was a love tome, with all else a mere backdrop to the deep and yet ephemeral emotional tangle of the chief protagonists. I look forward eagerly to the next in the series. Well done Mr Cameron

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    Everything this man rites is fantastic. This book is no different. He reminds me of Vince Flynn's books, easy to read, great characters, lots of action and always gets your attention in the first couple paragraphs. Cant wait to read more in this series!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Linda Humberstone

    Good story with interesting characters and lots of intrigue going on. A brilliant description of a battle towards the end of the book, you really feel as if you can see what is going on and you are there.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tony Kirkland

    In my opinion this book was a interested read but not very suspenseful.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zaib Rizvi

    Did not like it.. couldn’t finish it

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tony Walsh

    Never so happy to have picked up a new author than I have been when I finished reading this book. I'm a man who loves little details and this book delivers. They really help you feel immersed in the story and like you're living it too. There's a passage in the book where the main characters are sitting around a fire talking and the description of this scene really puts you alongside them. As for the battle scenes, nothing I've read before this and very few after have compared. And the ones that Never so happy to have picked up a new author than I have been when I finished reading this book. I'm a man who loves little details and this book delivers. They really help you feel immersed in the story and like you're living it too. There's a passage in the book where the main characters are sitting around a fire talking and the description of this scene really puts you alongside them. As for the battle scenes, nothing I've read before this and very few after have compared. And the ones that did were by this same author. No one describes a battle scene like this guys. I felt like I was back in the army on exercise and operations with the pace of them. Think battle of the bastards in GOT when you're reading them. The noise confusion a speed are all imensly described. By far one of my favourites by one of my favourites.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.