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The Sacred Art of Stealing

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Let us prey … The press tend to talk about bank robberies as being daring, ingenious and audacious. They don’t describe many as Dadaist, even the ones who know what ‘Dadaist’ means. But how else does one explain choreographed dancing gunmen in Buchanan Street, or the surreal methods they use to stay one step ahead of the cops? Angelique de Xavia is no art critic, but she is Let us prey … The press tend to talk about bank robberies as being daring, ingenious and audacious. They don’t describe many as Dadaist, even the ones who know what ‘Dadaist’ means. But how else does one explain choreographed dancing gunmen in Buchanan Street, or the surreal methods they use to stay one step ahead of the cops? Angelique de Xavia is no art critic, but she is a connoisseur of crooks, and she’s sure that the heist she got caught up in wasn’t the work of the usual sawn-offs-and-black-tights practitioners indigenous to the parish. She knows she’s dealing with a unique species of thief, and it’s her job to hunt him to extinction – though the fact that it’s not just his m.o. that’s cute might prove a distraction. This thief, however, has greater concerns than his own safety, and a secret agenda more valuable than anything he might steal. He can afford to play cat and mouse with the female cop who’s on his tail; it might even arguably be necessary. What he can’t afford to do is to let her get too close; he could end up in jail, which holds terrors enough; but even more scary, he could end up in love. Honesty is a virtue. Deceit is a talent. Theft is an art form. The Sacred Art Of Stealing: prepare to be misled.


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Let us prey … The press tend to talk about bank robberies as being daring, ingenious and audacious. They don’t describe many as Dadaist, even the ones who know what ‘Dadaist’ means. But how else does one explain choreographed dancing gunmen in Buchanan Street, or the surreal methods they use to stay one step ahead of the cops? Angelique de Xavia is no art critic, but she is Let us prey … The press tend to talk about bank robberies as being daring, ingenious and audacious. They don’t describe many as Dadaist, even the ones who know what ‘Dadaist’ means. But how else does one explain choreographed dancing gunmen in Buchanan Street, or the surreal methods they use to stay one step ahead of the cops? Angelique de Xavia is no art critic, but she is a connoisseur of crooks, and she’s sure that the heist she got caught up in wasn’t the work of the usual sawn-offs-and-black-tights practitioners indigenous to the parish. She knows she’s dealing with a unique species of thief, and it’s her job to hunt him to extinction – though the fact that it’s not just his m.o. that’s cute might prove a distraction. This thief, however, has greater concerns than his own safety, and a secret agenda more valuable than anything he might steal. He can afford to play cat and mouse with the female cop who’s on his tail; it might even arguably be necessary. What he can’t afford to do is to let her get too close; he could end up in jail, which holds terrors enough; but even more scary, he could end up in love. Honesty is a virtue. Deceit is a talent. Theft is an art form. The Sacred Art Of Stealing: prepare to be misled.

30 review for The Sacred Art of Stealing

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Oh, this was great! Paul recommended it, but warned that many of the Scottish cultural references would go over my head. Sure enough, I think I missed about half of it (resulting in a late-night karate lecture on the Celtics vs. Rangers issues) but I really loved the book anyway, and I think Zal is now my favorite fictional character. I can't wait to read the upcoming sequel! (Okay, it's out in the UK, but I can't seem to get my hands on a copy.) This is a sequel to _A Big Boy Did it and Ran Away Oh, this was great! Paul recommended it, but warned that many of the Scottish cultural references would go over my head. Sure enough, I think I missed about half of it (resulting in a late-night karate lecture on the Celtics vs. Rangers issues) but I really loved the book anyway, and I think Zal is now my favorite fictional character. I can't wait to read the upcoming sequel! (Okay, it's out in the UK, but I can't seem to get my hands on a copy.) This is a sequel to _A Big Boy Did it and Ran Away_ (the one with the gamer (Ray) who runs into his old friend Simon Darcourt, who has become a terrorist, and together with Angelique (a police officer) Ray takes him down). In this one, Angelique is dealing with the aftermath of having taken down a terrorist, and being alternately idolized and rebuked by her department. On her 30th birthday, they call her in to end a standoff at a bank robbery. Instead, she's taken hostage by the robbers, and discovers a very odd robbery with an even odder ringleader, with whom she discovers she shares an alarming attraction. Things only get weirder from there. :) Part of the attraction of the book (other than the usual Brookmyre humor and cutting insight into everyday people) is the way Zal outthinks not only the other characters in the book, but the reader. I have to admit, I'm one of those people who can usually guess who done it by the middle of a book, and I loved how every time I thought I understood the situation, I was one step behind Zal. That was some good writing. As with all Brookmyre, it is not for the faint of stomach. That said, read it! :D

  2. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    Be warned, this book contains language and humour. This is a continuation of A Big Boy Did it and Ran Away - if Brookmyre does one thing well, he does do a good title. If you are thinking of reading this it might be a good idea to read that one first - although this is by far the better of the two books. This novel is probably my favourite of all of his books - but only just and they are mostly all so much fun and such page turners that it is hard to really pick between them. Another warning is th Be warned, this book contains language and humour. This is a continuation of A Big Boy Did it and Ran Away - if Brookmyre does one thing well, he does do a good title. If you are thinking of reading this it might be a good idea to read that one first - although this is by far the better of the two books. This novel is probably my favourite of all of his books - but only just and they are mostly all so much fun and such page turners that it is hard to really pick between them. Another warning is that there comes a point in virtually all of his books when it is impossible to stop reading - in this one perhaps when the two main characters end up in Paris for the weekend. Brookmyre is laugh-out-loud funny - which makes reading him on public transport quite something. His stories are lightning fast, beautifully crafted and a joy to read. You rarely have to wait for one of Brookmyre's books to get started. The fact his characters also have interesting things to say in passing about racism, nationalism, religion, violence, the national health, sex, football and growing old doesn't hurt either.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    This is, loosely, a follow-on from A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away. Same locale, and the focus here in on the wonderfully named Angelique de Xavia, who played a large part in the previous book. Do you need to have read Big Boy to get everything here? No, you'd be able to piece together the necessary inferences about what happened, but it would somewhat spoil things should you then want to go back and read the prequel. Anyway, what I wrote in my review of that book still stands.Quite the high adventu This is, loosely, a follow-on from A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away. Same locale, and the focus here in on the wonderfully named Angelique de Xavia, who played a large part in the previous book. Do you need to have read Big Boy to get everything here? No, you'd be able to piece together the necessary inferences about what happened, but it would somewhat spoil things should you then want to go back and read the prequel. Anyway, what I wrote in my review of that book still stands.Quite the high adventure. Plenty of profanity, satire and characters spouting misanthropic vitriol. Took quite a bit of effort to parse the Scots lingo at times, and there was some I still couldn't get. The sports references sailed right by — I don't even follow American stuff. The cultural mismatch slowed down my reading so the hook didn't really sink in until one third of the book was gone, but eventually the shenanigans should grab anyone. Can't say that I think Brookmyre is the next greatest thing, but still a fun read.Yup, pretty much more of the screwball same. This sequel did have quite a bit more salaciousness, and while it has been a while since I read the first, I believe he did a better job of developing his characters. Oddly, the only scene and relationship that might merit tittilating content got a soft-focus soft-core treatment. The naughty bits were tangential to the story, and intended more to cause the reader to gawp and snicker. Certainly good enough that I'm buying the next (and last) to feature this cast of characters. ­

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachael Hewison

    I think this is my favourite Christopher Brookmyre book. I couldn't put it down. Whilst it's supposed to be a sequel to 'A big boy did it and ran away', aside from having Angelique de Xavia in it, it didn't feel like a sequel. I don't think you really need to have read the first book to enjoy this one and I definitely think this was the better of the two. I absolutely loved every interaction between Angelique and Zal. Their chemistry and banter just sizzled off the page. It felt odd in some ways I think this is my favourite Christopher Brookmyre book. I couldn't put it down. Whilst it's supposed to be a sequel to 'A big boy did it and ran away', aside from having Angelique de Xavia in it, it didn't feel like a sequel. I don't think you really need to have read the first book to enjoy this one and I definitely think this was the better of the two. I absolutely loved every interaction between Angelique and Zal. Their chemistry and banter just sizzled off the page. It felt odd in some ways that it was a Brookmyre novel I was reading; female cop falling for a bank robber sounded like a cliched chick lit book, but with Brookmyre's humourous lines it worked so well. I stayed up late reading because I wanted to see what happened between them. Brookmyre has a brilliant talent for thinking up complex but hugely interesting plots and it was a fantastically well thought out bank robbery. With a couple of the chapters I did feel my interest waning slightly, with new characters being introduced that I didn't see what they were for, but overall the book had me completely hooked.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Clever, clever book. (well I susppose I mean clever clever author). I love Christopher Brookmyre and have been listening to a few oh his superb narratives as audiobooks. (Totally recommend that as well - listening to these words in a right Scottish accent makes the words even funnier!). The language is flawless, funny, subtle, to the point, complex, rude, considered and utterly brilliant. I expect that Mr Brookmyre will not be to everyone's taste - and seriously, it always takes a while to "get in Clever, clever book. (well I susppose I mean clever clever author). I love Christopher Brookmyre and have been listening to a few oh his superb narratives as audiobooks. (Totally recommend that as well - listening to these words in a right Scottish accent makes the words even funnier!). The language is flawless, funny, subtle, to the point, complex, rude, considered and utterly brilliant. I expect that Mr Brookmyre will not be to everyone's taste - and seriously, it always takes a while to "get into the book"...at times you wonder how all these plots, characters, sub-plots and intriging bits of character information could possible all be related. And yet - he pulls it together every time - every time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    "The Sacred Art of Stealing” takes place a relatively short time after its predecessor "A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away.” Angelique has successfully thwarted the terrorist plot at Dubh Ardrain, but she’s now in the process of paying the psychological toll for her efforts as the next crisis unfolds. Though some of the cultural references went over my head, I can still appreciate this book for its witty internal monologs and tongue-in-cheek exchanges. Brookmyer offers a great deal of pointed social "The Sacred Art of Stealing” takes place a relatively short time after its predecessor "A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away.” Angelique has successfully thwarted the terrorist plot at Dubh Ardrain, but she’s now in the process of paying the psychological toll for her efforts as the next crisis unfolds. Though some of the cultural references went over my head, I can still appreciate this book for its witty internal monologs and tongue-in-cheek exchanges. Brookmyer offers a great deal of pointed social commentary in this way, but there’s never a dull moment of philosophizing. He fashions a distinguishable voice for each character and fully commits to their mentality on command. I was equally appalled whether reading the incendiary beliefs of Walter’s conservatism or the staightforward grittiness of Harry’s depravity. Yet, the thing I love most of all is Angelique’s ‘larger than life’ presence in the midst of such a robust cast of characters. She’s an empowered, multi-demensional female battling criminal extremism and the good ole' boys club one day at a time. How many other Scottish-Ugandan counterintelligence officers have you read about? It’s refreshing. Lord knows the existence of books like these are few and far between.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gail Williams

    The Sacred Art of Stealing the Readers Heart I can’t even remember why I picked this book up, but from the moment I did, I didn’t want to put it down. It doesn’t start when you’d expect and it keeps the reader on a rollercoaster all the way through. The idea of the original bank heist was sheer brilliance, even made me finish reading “Waiting for Godot”, yes reading, I’ve never seen it, though I would like to. This was the first Brookmyre I ever read, and so didn’t have the background on Angeliqu The Sacred Art of Stealing the Readers Heart I can’t even remember why I picked this book up, but from the moment I did, I didn’t want to put it down. It doesn’t start when you’d expect and it keeps the reader on a rollercoaster all the way through. The idea of the original bank heist was sheer brilliance, even made me finish reading “Waiting for Godot”, yes reading, I’ve never seen it, though I would like to. This was the first Brookmyre I ever read, and so didn’t have the background on Angelique, that came in the previous book “A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away”, but trust me, it doesn’t distract from this book in the least. The characters are well realised and the action is so twisted and amusing, that at times I was left crying with laughter, the ending worked particularly well. Only one word of warning - if you find out a little Celtic vs Rangers background it will help, or you could just accept that there are some references that will go over you head (I took the second option and it didn’t spoil the book at all). Would recommend this book to anyone.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Campbell

    I don't remember much about this one except that I enjoyed it immensely and that it was extremely funny. Oh and the clowns. Bank robbers dressed as clowns.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    Having recently read A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away, my first book by Christopher Brookmyre, I was keen to get more of that good stuff. The Sacred Art of Stealing, is the next in the Angelique De Xavier series and is every bit as good as the first one, A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away. It opens with a most original and imaginative bank heist: a Situationist, Dadaist type robbery which soon involves Angelique, dragged away from a Rangers game, and soon abseiling into a developing hostage situation. Af Having recently read A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away, my first book by Christopher Brookmyre, I was keen to get more of that good stuff. The Sacred Art of Stealing, is the next in the Angelique De Xavier series and is every bit as good as the first one, A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away. It opens with a most original and imaginative bank heist: a Situationist, Dadaist type robbery which soon involves Angelique, dragged away from a Rangers game, and soon abseiling into a developing hostage situation. After which the plot goes in all kinds of unexpected and enjoyable directions. Another winner from Christopher Brookmyre. I look forward to reading more of his work. 4/5

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    Second book featuring Glasgow DI Angelique de Xavia, this was a most surreal caper story with the author's trademark humor and a bit of romance.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dominik

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The book was just going to ask you about my work To the earth 🌎you a lot easier and the other day when they are going up in the space,I am not a lot of the people that you ready for bed and I was just thinking,the most Dr appt with Dr pepper what you doing I 00👌think think it's a lot i have no idea 💡is I was thinking about the o well o ok o oto ok cool thanks again for everything and everyone I said it was the only one in mars 🔥and and everyone who had been the subject,but 0percent how much is y The book was just going to ask you about my work To the earth 🌎you a lot easier and the other day when they are going up in the space,I am not a lot of the people that you ready for bed and I was just thinking,the most Dr appt with Dr pepper what you doing I 00👌think think it's a lot i have no idea 💡is I was thinking about the o well o ok o oto ok cool thanks again for everything and everyone I said it was the only one in mars 🔥and and everyone who had been the subject,but 0percent how much is your address below

  12. 4 out of 5

    MissNoMer

    I have not felt genuinely torn apart from wanting-to-flip-the-pages-as-fast-as-I-could, and not-wanting-the-story-to-end, as much as I did as I read this one. I even stopped somewhere in the middle of the book and re-read from the very first page. That's how compellingly interested this book is. As a direct continuation from the previous events, Angelique de Xavia was (at first) unwillingly dragged into a robbery in progress, but later on had her life turned inside out/upside down by the artfully I have not felt genuinely torn apart from wanting-to-flip-the-pages-as-fast-as-I-could, and not-wanting-the-story-to-end, as much as I did as I read this one. I even stopped somewhere in the middle of the book and re-read from the very first page. That's how compellingly interested this book is. As a direct continuation from the previous events, Angelique de Xavia was (at first) unwillingly dragged into a robbery in progress, but later on had her life turned inside out/upside down by the artfully gentleman of a thief called Zal Innez. He is at the no. 1 spot of my little list of the most likeable criminal. Having finally finished, I have all sorts of feelings mixed up at the very same time. Sad but hopeful at the conclusion, deceived and a bit stupid for not being able to predict the carefully planned tricks, and most of all in awe with Christopher Brookmyre. He never ceased to amaze! I have a silly smile plastered on my face (in hopes to suppress a laugh as I was reading on the train). Also worth mentioning that I had the help from two colleagues from Aberdeen and Glesca with all those Scottish fitba/cultural/jokes references. Otherwise, Google is your best friend.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steven Day

    This is the second of Brookmyre's books I've read, a few general observations first: He likes to point out people's, so, obvious discrimination but his lead character couldn't be any more trying to pigeon hole in a target for this in a female, asylum seeking, Catholic police officer. This doesn't stop Angelique from being a good character, it's just a bit overkill. He doesn't seem to like Celtic or Rangers fans much, especially the former. He comes across as a very, embittered St Mirren fan. I onl This is the second of Brookmyre's books I've read, a few general observations first: He likes to point out people's, so, obvious discrimination but his lead character couldn't be any more trying to pigeon hole in a target for this in a female, asylum seeking, Catholic police officer. This doesn't stop Angelique from being a good character, it's just a bit overkill. He doesn't seem to like Celtic or Rangers fans much, especially the former. He comes across as a very, embittered St Mirren fan. I only know one other of these, he is the same. The factors above detracted a little from both stories, particularly this one in the early stages. It's a shame to let his pettiness get in the way too, as the story itself is very well written, other than the opening chapter - his American starts off sounding like a Glaswegian - and the other parts mentioned. Adding to the enjoyment were some good one liners and intricate but understandable plots. I will read the next in the series and possibly more by the author but my enthusiasm has been curbed by the factors I mentioned.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Phil Leader

    A daring bank robbery in broad daylight puts detective Angelique De Xavier on the trail of a highly intelligent, highly motivated and highly unusual thief. The closer she gets the more she both admires him and wonders at his real motives. This is classic Brookmyre; plenty of Scottish patois and references, clever and imaginative situations and well drawn characters. Nobody in a Brookmyre novel is black or white, everyone has shades of grey, sometimes more than one shade and this book is no except A daring bank robbery in broad daylight puts detective Angelique De Xavier on the trail of a highly intelligent, highly motivated and highly unusual thief. The closer she gets the more she both admires him and wonders at his real motives. This is classic Brookmyre; plenty of Scottish patois and references, clever and imaginative situations and well drawn characters. Nobody in a Brookmyre novel is black or white, everyone has shades of grey, sometimes more than one shade and this book is no exception. As would be expected this is a thriller with a wry twist of humour running through it; the bank robbery itself is both tense and a hoot to read as the police are completely outmaneouvred. As the real pursuit by De Xavier continues through the rest of the book the reader is drawn in and exposed to every twist as she experiences it. A thoroughly good read and highly recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    This book pretty much has it all. Crime, Humour, Romance..... I didn't enjoy it as much as "A big boy did it and ran away" perhaps because the romance between the two main protagonists seemed a tad unlikely. That being said, the imagination that went into the crimes committed in Glasgow's well-known museums and banks (albeit subtly renamed) is second to none. It's a well-crafted story of revenge as a dish best served cold, as one criminal sets up another for a fall. The initial bank robbery commi This book pretty much has it all. Crime, Humour, Romance..... I didn't enjoy it as much as "A big boy did it and ran away" perhaps because the romance between the two main protagonists seemed a tad unlikely. That being said, the imagination that went into the crimes committed in Glasgow's well-known museums and banks (albeit subtly renamed) is second to none. It's a well-crafted story of revenge as a dish best served cold, as one criminal sets up another for a fall. The initial bank robbery committed by a group of clowns is masterfully described, as well as imaginatively planned. Then we have the unlikely romance, and we are followed by the second imaginative crime, with bluff and double bluff and revenge sewn right through. All good stuff. I wonder if we will see DI Xavier again?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Wow. I really didn't expect to end up liking this book, but the ending is brilliant. The first ~200 pages are painfully slow, with so much dialect and a ridiculous amount of Scottish soccer trivia masquerading as character development. I also found it very difficult to keep all the characters straight because the story shifted so much between them. It all makes sense in the end, though, as the different story arcs come together in an unexpected and hilarious way. Brookmyre is a genius. There are Wow. I really didn't expect to end up liking this book, but the ending is brilliant. The first ~200 pages are painfully slow, with so much dialect and a ridiculous amount of Scottish soccer trivia masquerading as character development. I also found it very difficult to keep all the characters straight because the story shifted so much between them. It all makes sense in the end, though, as the different story arcs come together in an unexpected and hilarious way. Brookmyre is a genius. There are elements of a stereotypical crime story, and a stereotypical romance (not to mention how goddamn cliché it is for both of these stories to overlap), but there's so much absurd shit and dark comedy that the story feels refreshingly original.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    * I was really looking forward to listening to this book having enjoyed the first in the series and overall I was not disappointed. * Unfortunately the reader on the audiobook does not have a North American accent to match her fantastic Scottish accent which was somewhat of a distraction until I got to a point where I could mostly ignore it. The poor rendition of an American accent was further complicated by the fact that at least one of the criminals is meant to have a poor North American accent * I was really looking forward to listening to this book having enjoyed the first in the series and overall I was not disappointed. * Unfortunately the reader on the audiobook does not have a North American accent to match her fantastic Scottish accent which was somewhat of a distraction until I got to a point where I could mostly ignore it. The poor rendition of an American accent was further complicated by the fact that at least one of the criminals is meant to have a poor North American accent. * My only other niggle is that the number of characters sometimes confused me. * The good news is that none of this was enough to stop me enjoying Brookmyre’s brilliant humour and his particularly amazing bank robbery. * I will definitely be reading the third book in the series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deanne

    My only regret is that I didn't realise that this was the second book, and by the time I knew it was too late, I was hooked. Brookmyre is very good at creating plots with more twists and turns in them than a road in the alps. The characters are great too, some you can love and others you can hate, cheering loudly when they get what you think they deserve. The whole bank job is brilliant and had me laughing out loud, can't wait for the next.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Euan Pollock

    One of Brookmyre's best. The anti-hero is a fantastic character, and the plot itself one of his creatively entangled ones that resolves nicely at the end. So much wit on the way through as well - a great book to read. Not quite my favourite, that's the Attack of the Unsinkable Rubber Ducks, but this surely runs it a close second.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Loki

    Brookmyre has never been better than here. No book of his is as dazzling in its plotting, as witty in its humour or as grounded in its concerns. While not as dark as the Jasmine Sharp novels get, it's got no shortage of dark moments amidst the glam of it all - in many ways, it's one of Brookmyre's most human stories. Anyway, I re-read it in a sitting, because I love it and I hadn't in too long.

  21. 4 out of 5

    James

    The author is clever and funny but the book is somehow less clever and funny than he is. The story moves along quickly and the book is a page turner but I have read funnier books and I have read cleverer books. I felt that the book was too short to be satisfying. Still, I would read more from the author. The Sacred Art of Stealing is worth a read if only for it's in-depth discussion on blow jobs.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mithin Nair

    Magical indeed! Well, I wouldn't have expected this second part to be heart warming.. Everyone who has fallen in love despite knowing it's not the right person will relate to the beautifully magical love story between Angelique and the elusive magician... Intelligent and interesting characters.. All the heists were excellently plotted and carried out...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sharondblk

    I love Christopher Brookmyre. This book is a romp from start to finish. Even the bad guy is fun, rather than a scary psychopath. my only criticism, and I'm not sure it is a criticism, is that some of the middle bits read more like a romance than a comedy/suspence/detective novel, or whatever genre this is supposed to be. But i love romance, so that's not much of a criticism!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beautiful_Jade

    Best read after A Big Boy Did It And Ran Away as there are some character and story continuations. Another fun, thrilling and slightly (alright, massively) ridiculous book. Angelique and Zal are both great characters and I would love to read more of their adventures. The whole bank robbery was genius and I'm glad Mr Athena eventually got his comeuppance.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This was a very unusual crime story. It got off to a slowish start, but quickly picked up speed when Angel X was sent in to set up surreptitious monitoring of a bank robbery involving hostages and an unusually gentlemanly bank robber. The plot was full of twists, with multiple criminals getting involved and many different agendas. Very enjoyable!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brenton

    I enjoyed the story but at times found Brookmyre's writing style annoying. I'm not sure what to even point to about it, there were just times when despite being invested in the plot I found getting through the text a slog.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben Green

    One day I will have read all of Christopher Brookmyre's books. That will be a sad day. This was my favourite so far, an absolute belter of a crime/comedy romp with twists, turns and sleight of hand a plenty.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marty

    Read about 30 pages, ending with a five page introspection by the lead character about how things were a mess in her life. Or something. I looked ahead about twenty more pages and saw no signs of dialog and decided it just wasn't for me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Teddy

    Great exploration of morality vs laws - interesting characters.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lilly Wood

    Now this a Christmas story! I'm literally reading these books back to back.... devour is more like it. I literally cant get enough of Christopher Brookmyre!

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