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Nick Drake: The Biography

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Nick Drake was barely 26 years old when he died in 1974 following an accidental overdose of prescribed drugs. The British singer-songwriter made only three albums during his short life - Five Leaves Left, Bryter Layter and Pink Moon. All are now recognized as classics. Since his death, Nick has been cited as a seminal influence by stars as diverse as REM, Elton John, and Pa Nick Drake was barely 26 years old when he died in 1974 following an accidental overdose of prescribed drugs. The British singer-songwriter made only three albums during his short life - Five Leaves Left, Bryter Layter and Pink Moon. All are now recognized as classics. Since his death, Nick has been cited as a seminal influence by stars as diverse as REM, Elton John, and Paul Weller. While the lives of other musicians who died before their time, such as Jim Morrison, John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Gram Parsons, have been amply documented, there has never before been a biography of Nick Drake. Patrick Humphries' illuminating text includes exclusive interviews with friends, colleagues and musicians who knew and worked with Nick. It provides an unprecedented insight not only into the life and work of Nick Drake, but also into the music scene of the 1960s that formed his backdrop. If a week is a long time in politics, then the 23 years since Nick's death represents a lifetime in the transitory world of pop. But the music of Nick Drake has never lost its place in his fans affections, and still its haunting beauty reaches out of fresh generations. This book is for all of them.


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Nick Drake was barely 26 years old when he died in 1974 following an accidental overdose of prescribed drugs. The British singer-songwriter made only three albums during his short life - Five Leaves Left, Bryter Layter and Pink Moon. All are now recognized as classics. Since his death, Nick has been cited as a seminal influence by stars as diverse as REM, Elton John, and Pa Nick Drake was barely 26 years old when he died in 1974 following an accidental overdose of prescribed drugs. The British singer-songwriter made only three albums during his short life - Five Leaves Left, Bryter Layter and Pink Moon. All are now recognized as classics. Since his death, Nick has been cited as a seminal influence by stars as diverse as REM, Elton John, and Paul Weller. While the lives of other musicians who died before their time, such as Jim Morrison, John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Gram Parsons, have been amply documented, there has never before been a biography of Nick Drake. Patrick Humphries' illuminating text includes exclusive interviews with friends, colleagues and musicians who knew and worked with Nick. It provides an unprecedented insight not only into the life and work of Nick Drake, but also into the music scene of the 1960s that formed his backdrop. If a week is a long time in politics, then the 23 years since Nick's death represents a lifetime in the transitory world of pop. But the music of Nick Drake has never lost its place in his fans affections, and still its haunting beauty reaches out of fresh generations. This book is for all of them.

30 review for Nick Drake: The Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Philly Aesthete Brown

    Nick Drake is in the top 10 of my all time favorite singer-songwriters. One of his gifts, I think, was the innate soulfulness of not just the lyrics and of his voice, but also of his chord changes. You can take a song like "Saturday Sun" and play it in a blues and contemporary gospel vein (as I do) and not have to do much in the way of chord substitution. The blue notes and the funk are already built into the chord changes of the song. I love him for that. I adore his use of really flavorful dim Nick Drake is in the top 10 of my all time favorite singer-songwriters. One of his gifts, I think, was the innate soulfulness of not just the lyrics and of his voice, but also of his chord changes. You can take a song like "Saturday Sun" and play it in a blues and contemporary gospel vein (as I do) and not have to do much in the way of chord substitution. The blue notes and the funk are already built into the chord changes of the song. I love him for that. I adore his use of really flavorful diminished and half diminished chords in many of his compositions. He always seemed to know the exact perfect moment to use them. The folk-sters claim Drake big time, but so do we funk-sters. This is book is well-researched. I appreciated reading about his university days, hearing about the germination of songs I love so much, and getting the perspective of his long suffering parents, but the book's subject still proves fairly elusive by the end. Each time I re-read this, I'm always sad all over again that the mental health resources that are so ubiquitous and considerably less tinged with stigma today were not really available to him.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    I thought I would learn something about his life..apparently he didn't talk much. Fans only.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Wright

    This book was such a romanticized piece of garbage playing on the (unfairly) romanticized mythos of Drake's untimely death. Since he seems to have been a fairly private guy, all the book really provides is contradictory conjecture about the man's life, and by the end one finds that the book hasn't really taught you anything about Drake, what he did with his life, or what kind of person he was. All you get really is a lot of other people's guesses as to what Drake was like. This was a real piece This book was such a romanticized piece of garbage playing on the (unfairly) romanticized mythos of Drake's untimely death. Since he seems to have been a fairly private guy, all the book really provides is contradictory conjecture about the man's life, and by the end one finds that the book hasn't really taught you anything about Drake, what he did with his life, or what kind of person he was. All you get really is a lot of other people's guesses as to what Drake was like. This was a real piece of hackwork.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Janina

    I didn't pick up this book as a Nick Drake fan. Although Nick Drake's name faintly rang a bell, I hadn't known anything about him really and a quick look at Wikipedia told me, he was this depressed guy, who died when he was only 26. But fortunately Patrick Humphries doesn't concentrate only on those dark days in the last years of his short life, which were undeniably there. No, he found school mates from the public school Nick went to and also friends from his time at Cambridge, who draw the pict I didn't pick up this book as a Nick Drake fan. Although Nick Drake's name faintly rang a bell, I hadn't known anything about him really and a quick look at Wikipedia told me, he was this depressed guy, who died when he was only 26. But fortunately Patrick Humphries doesn't concentrate only on those dark days in the last years of his short life, which were undeniably there. No, he found school mates from the public school Nick went to and also friends from his time at Cambridge, who draw the picture of a shy but happy person. An anecdote about Nick Drake, which warmed my heart, was when he was at Cambridge at a friend's place, where he found and lit a candle and put it on the surface of a book and then the friend saw him "teetering off on his bicycle across the college, balancing that huge book on his handlebars. He was shielding the flame, and with the candle still flickering, cycled off." A bit unclear is how he knew all these people in London and how he got into contact with them. What kind of irritated me was the talk about "myth" and "cult" about Nick Drake and the question why his music is still so popular. In my opinion that is a question which every person, who listens to Nick Drake's music, has to answer for him- or herself. For my taste Patrick Humphries uses the words cult and myth too often, even if he tries to downplay that part. All in all a good read about a normal guy, who wasn't so normal after all.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Polly

    I didn't actually like this book at all. It's hard to "like" books about nice young men from ordinary backgrounds who happen to be brilliant musicians and also suicidally depressed and so kill themselves. It's a perfectly fine book, but it proves two things very conclusively: 1)people who make beautiful music don't necessarily have exciting lives and 2)depression and suicide are not interesting, glamorous or romantic, they're just miserable and tragic. Not that I personally needed to have the la I didn't actually like this book at all. It's hard to "like" books about nice young men from ordinary backgrounds who happen to be brilliant musicians and also suicidally depressed and so kill themselves. It's a perfectly fine book, but it proves two things very conclusively: 1)people who make beautiful music don't necessarily have exciting lives and 2)depression and suicide are not interesting, glamorous or romantic, they're just miserable and tragic. Not that I personally needed to have the latter fact confirmed, but if you do, here's the book for you.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    Obviously quite a sad story since the chronically depressed Drake died, either accidentally or deliberately by overdose, at age twenty-six. This biography is unlikely to interest readers who are not already Drake fans. He released only three albums in his short lifetime, and it's his last, Pink Moon, I've always been enamored of. I've never heard a collection of songs that so beautifully and perfectly capture the infinite sadness and utter desolation of profound melancholy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hoezodanbooks

    Loving scrapbook 270 pages long Patrick Humphries collects in this 1997 biography all he could find about the singer songwriter and put it together: anecdotes of rare performances, descriptions of ads in music magazines, a solid and complete discography, he talks with Francoise Hardy about her contact with Nick Drake and discusses every release (unfortunately only 3 albums of course) but also the records that are in the Island catalog numbered before and after Drakes albums! Humphries has an incr Loving scrapbook 270 pages long Patrick Humphries collects in this 1997 biography all he could find about the singer songwriter and put it together: anecdotes of rare performances, descriptions of ads in music magazines, a solid and complete discography, he talks with Francoise Hardy about her contact with Nick Drake and discusses every release (unfortunately only 3 albums of course) but also the records that are in the Island catalog numbered before and after Drakes albums! Humphries has an incredible eye for (sometimes seemingly unimportant) details and that has 1 cause and 1 effect. The main cause is that a number of very important people who knew Nick would or could not participate in this book. Nick's parents were deceased, Nicks sister did not want to participate and the same was true for producer Joe Boyd. Moreover, he wasn’t permit to use the lyrics of Nicks songs in the book. Definitely one shortcoming. This clearly did not deter the author, but did lead to the following effect: this book is above all (perhaps even exclusively) a book for fans of Nick Drake. It is bland and too easy to write only about what a book ISN’T. So….. The very first biography ever of Nick Drake really does have something to offer. In particular, the school period until his departure to London is an extremely readable part. Not only because of the (unexpected) picture of Nick outlined, but also because it pictures nicely how it was to grow up as a teenager in rural England in the 60's. The descriptions of Tanworth-in-Arden, where he grew up and died, are particularly excellent. A stark contrast to the somewhat meager passages about London, although it probably has to do with a lack of first-hand stories. Humphries writes with love about Nick Drake and makes (at the end of the book) it crystal clear that he doesn’t want to cooperate with the existing myths about Nick Drake: the brilliant artist who was depressed all the time and ultimately couldn’t escape his fatal end. Humphries shows a different and surprising side of Nick in his teens (funny, great athlete, etc.) that is at odds with the standard story. Unfortunately, Humphries can’t pinpoint in the end exactly what led to Nicks change in character. Was it drugs? Lack of success? Depression? A deadly cocktail of those 3? Or was there something else? On page 192 is a shocking story about Nick Drake that is exemplary for this book. Nick meets a girl into a house full of heroin addicts somewhere in 1974. He's clearly lost himself, when he is saying to her: "You remember me. You remember me how I was. Tell me how I was. I used to have a brain. I used to be somebody. What happened to me? What happened to me? " One of the many many anecdotes in this book, all lovingly collected by Patrick Humphries. That said, this story was already once published in 1975, in the NME, written by Nick Kent.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    The Biography Nick Drake By Patrick Humphries This is a great Biography on Nick Drake one of the more misunderstood and mysterious characters to come out of the 60's music scene this book delves deep into Nicks short life from a young and gifted athlete at Marlborough College where his sprinting records lasted for over 20 years!! To seeing the Rolling Stones in Marrakesh where he even found them and busked for them at there hotel!! Not bad for someone always described as shy and withdrawn! To go The Biography Nick Drake By Patrick Humphries This is a great Biography on Nick Drake one of the more misunderstood and mysterious characters to come out of the 60's music scene this book delves deep into Nicks short life from a young and gifted athlete at Marlborough College where his sprinting records lasted for over 20 years!! To seeing the Rolling Stones in Marrakesh where he even found them and busked for them at there hotel!! Not bad for someone always described as shy and withdrawn! To going to Cambridge University and dropping out when his first album came out after he managed to sign a deal with Island records that guaranteed his records would never be deleted!! There are great stories about his live shows the few that they were in comparison to most artists of the time, but he did shows with among others John Martyn, Fairport Convention, Atomic Rooster, Genesis (Pre-Phil Collins). Loads of detail on the recording of all his albums and how he slowly withdrew into himself and regularly turned up at peoples houses and stayed for 2 or three days without speaking!! Good explanations of what makes his music special and the special tunings he had for all his songs that make them so hard to play and almost impossible to get the sound right. There is a good deal on the events leading up to his overdosing on Tryptazine that he had been prescribed as an anti-depressant after waking up in the middle of the night and eating a bowl of Cornflakes. Apparently the pills were very easy to OD on and were not a good drug to be on. The book also has stuff on how his fame and sales have grown steadily since his death and the additions to the 3 albums he put out in his lifetime including the Bedroom Tapes bootleg and Time of No Reply, but as the book came out in 1997 it misses the heights of his popularity in the new Millenium with the use of his music on Young Americans and the finding of some lost tapes that meant the official release of Made To Love Magic with it's rare treasures and the high quality boot that is Second Grace that contains most of the unreleased songs Patrick talks about. A great book about a very talented and deep guy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    this book covers the life and works of one of my all-time favorite composers and musicians, nick drake. patrick humphries wrote this book quite nicely -- somehow he manages to tie in the emotional obsession with nick along with all the factual data about how/where/when he grew up. there's also quite a bit of interesting information about the cultural/social/environmental climate surrounding nick's life - the political goings-on as well as a bit of history of rock for those interested. for instan this book covers the life and works of one of my all-time favorite composers and musicians, nick drake. patrick humphries wrote this book quite nicely -- somehow he manages to tie in the emotional obsession with nick along with all the factual data about how/where/when he grew up. there's also quite a bit of interesting information about the cultural/social/environmental climate surrounding nick's life - the political goings-on as well as a bit of history of rock for those interested. for instance, i knew little to nothing about island records before i read this book, and now i feel like i have a better knowledge of not only the record company, but also the people and musicians involved with it. i found this book to be a tad annoying at times, especially when patrick would go into one of his speculative tirades based on a question like, "why was nick's music so influential and loved?" but you gotta give him some points for the ways he sort of leads these discussions. who else would ask? above all, i find that this book answers some of the mysteriousness surrounding nick's life, death, and music. if nothing else, patrick humphries taught me that it's better to listen to his music rather than to obsess over his life (as many do). after all, what's the use in trying to figure out what went wrong when we can simply praise what nick wanted us to praise? (that being his most precious gift - music). <3

  10. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    As interested as I was the writing, was really uninteresting.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    His story breaks my heart; what a wonderful talent. Reading this as soon as I can get my hands on it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paris Turner

    Since his untimely death at the age of twenty-six in late 1974, the cult surrounding Nick Drake and his brief yet exquisitely beautiful discography continues to grow. Patrick Humphries' articulate and respectable chronicle of Drake's life, pieced together from recollections of the enigmatic musician's friends and family, is an undoubtedly sombre read. As many others have stated, Drake's life was far from uplifting. He has become an archetypal Romantic figure; a musical incarnate of the poets who Since his untimely death at the age of twenty-six in late 1974, the cult surrounding Nick Drake and his brief yet exquisitely beautiful discography continues to grow. Patrick Humphries' articulate and respectable chronicle of Drake's life, pieced together from recollections of the enigmatic musician's friends and family, is an undoubtedly sombre read. As many others have stated, Drake's life was far from uplifting. He has become an archetypal Romantic figure; a musical incarnate of the poets who inspired him - Shelley, Byron and Keats. Lost souls who were far too beautiful for this world, and only found recognition upon death. In Nick Drake: The Biography , Humphries' is able to deconstruct the mythos of Nick Drake by revealing incongruous images of his idyllic childhood and years spent as an athletic college student, before depression turned Drake into a shell of his former self. Humphries' dismisses the notion that Drake's decline was due solely to his lack of commercial success, and instead draws a more balanced conclusion lacking in both the speculation and romanticism prevalent among Drake's fanbase. Humphries does a brilliant job at constructing a moving account of Nick Drake. However, perhaps the greatest aspect of his wonderfully crafted portrait is not found in his deconstruction of Drake's image. More so, Nick Drake: The Biography serves as an explanation of how a seemingly unremarkable life laid the foundations for such a potent cloud of myth and legend.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Butterfly

    For serious fans only, and maybe not even them. And I consider myself one. This book wasn't so much bad as Nick Drake's life was so wildly unspectacular that there was hardly any story to tell/worth telling. The author painstakingly interviewed everyone who knew ND and each one confirmed: "I had no idea what was going on with him. He seemed messed up. He never talked." I found some of the information about how the music business worked at the time and about the recording and arranging of Nick's mu For serious fans only, and maybe not even them. And I consider myself one. This book wasn't so much bad as Nick Drake's life was so wildly unspectacular that there was hardly any story to tell/worth telling. The author painstakingly interviewed everyone who knew ND and each one confirmed: "I had no idea what was going on with him. He seemed messed up. He never talked." I found some of the information about how the music business worked at the time and about the recording and arranging of Nick's music rather interesting, though, and I'm glad I read it for the biographical overview, but I felt the book could have been shortened substantially.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aris Setyawan

    Actually I've read the Indonesian translation version. Read this book as an attempt to understand the interplay between musicians and depression: why are musicians prone to depression? And what is the best strategy to fight it. The tragic story of Nick Drake in this biography can explain these problem and become a valuable learning for all of us. So, why are musicians vulnerable to depression? Please read this book yourself to know the answer.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    a very detailed account of such a troubled life : i have a much greater understanding of these events from such a long time ago

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nick Sweeney

    I like the odd tune by Nick Drake, but I find much of what he did a bit dull. I think that, to appreciate Nick Drake’s work fully, you’d need to have a proper liking of dreamy acoustic guitar music generally absent from my tastes. I know I wouldn’t have read this book had I not come across in my fave bookshop ‘the charity shop’. I put off reading it for a few years. Well, I got through it, and it was interesting enough, I guess, for somebody like Nick Drake, who led a generally unremarkable life I like the odd tune by Nick Drake, but I find much of what he did a bit dull. I think that, to appreciate Nick Drake’s work fully, you’d need to have a proper liking of dreamy acoustic guitar music generally absent from my tastes. I know I wouldn’t have read this book had I not come across in my fave bookshop ‘the charity shop’. I put off reading it for a few years. Well, I got through it, and it was interesting enough, I guess, for somebody like Nick Drake, who led a generally unremarkable life, apart from the making of a small amount of music. I realise that if you’re really a big ND fan you’ll disagree. He was an able, and sporty, pupil at school, made friends from a similar upper-middle class background, left school and got into going to see bands, staying up and out all night and taking drugs on an occasional basis – so far so sixties, really. There wasn’t that much in the book that talked about what inspired him to write his songs, or to use his strange array of guitar tunings – nor even what they were; this was a time before the intense scrutiny suffered by musicians, and indeed, their own blah about every single thing they do. ND was a private individual. He rarely even did any gigs, such was his disdain for promoting himself, so it follows that there are few stories about him that make me you think you’re glad you heard them. I don’t want to take anything away from Patrick Humphries’ writing: it’s flowing and engaging, when he has something to flow with and to engage the reader with, but I think such moments are few and far between. I was also pleased and relieved that he wasn’t, for some reason, allowed to quote ND’s lyrics in the book; I really hate that lazy style of rock journalism that does that – you know, “So after the Velvet Underground broke up Lou Reed found himself taking ‘a walk on the wild side’ for the next three months” or “It was all at once true that ‘the kids had killed the man’ so Bowie had to form a new persona” etc etc etc. I think PH made the best of the material that he had, but quoting Nick’s school friends talking about yet another night when he seemed a little bit quiet and withdrawn, or the secretary at the record company recounting how Nick came in, mumbled, had a cup of tea and left began to pall after a while, and I wished there was more. He had a short, quiet life, left a small body of work behind – priceless, if that’s what you’re into – and of course provokes curiosity, but he died in an age just before over-examination and a madness to record every single instant, and it didn’t make for a great book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    as someone coming at Nick Drake quite late on and with no real conception of the life the artist led apart from articles that talk of a doomed soul I found this book illuminating and of interest. to look at Nick as constantly tortured seems to neglect some early years of happiness which also made the man what he was and this book does a good job of unlocking the early years through archive family interviews plus interviews with peers both in the music business an in Nick' s life growing up. it has as someone coming at Nick Drake quite late on and with no real conception of the life the artist led apart from articles that talk of a doomed soul I found this book illuminating and of interest. to look at Nick as constantly tortured seems to neglect some early years of happiness which also made the man what he was and this book does a good job of unlocking the early years through archive family interviews plus interviews with peers both in the music business an in Nick' s life growing up. it has little new to offer from his family as at the time of th book going ahead I understand Nick' s parents had passed on and his sister withdrew from interviews as the author had interviewed Gabrielle before for a magazine publication he was able to include her and Nick' s parents voices within the wealth of information. the picture of Drake is a complex one here is someone who sought fame in his lifetime yet seemed to eschew the pursuit of it in the traditional sense thus always remaining a figure on the edges rather than centre stage. apart from one compilation I owned very little of Nick Drake' s material prior to this book,due to the enthusiasm of the author I have since bought more as the tales of how the three albums were created suggest an interesting and fairly diverse body of work for such what remains a small amount of released and available material.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julie_ian_curtis

    I read this when in came out in 1997. There is very little written about Nick in his lifetime and what has been written after his death seems woefully inadequate. What strikes me now, reading this 10+ years later is the similarity of Nicks behaviour and my Ian Curtis. Staying at friends houses arriving and leaving unannounced. Nick was not appreciated in his lifetime and I feel not appreciated enough now he's gone. Like Ian, unappreciated if only we knew more how to treat physical and mental ill I read this when in came out in 1997. There is very little written about Nick in his lifetime and what has been written after his death seems woefully inadequate. What strikes me now, reading this 10+ years later is the similarity of Nicks behaviour and my Ian Curtis. Staying at friends houses arriving and leaving unannounced. Nick was not appreciated in his lifetime and I feel not appreciated enough now he's gone. Like Ian, unappreciated if only we knew more how to treat physical and mental illness. Contrary to the standard 'fan' opinion I do not blame the record label. There was more going on here . The writer, addresses the 'gay' theory with grace and humanity which I applaud. However, while commenting on Nicks lack of media exposure, mentions too often unrelated situational and 'at that time so and so were big' with lame parralells which makes us realise even more there was precious little revealed about Nick in his lifetime and unlike many other talents who have passed (Buckley, cobain) there is little left behind. There is no video footage of nick and only 1 known audio recording of him speaking. Surely we can do more for him but I don't know how and the answers are not here. It is what it is, with not much left to leave.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Clark Chambers

    Ok, well may start by saying that while Patrick Humphries is a perfectly competent writer, I thoroughly believe that, (A) He knows nothing about Nick or his music and had absolutely no passion for the man or his music. And (B) He has done little or no research for this book. The content of this book seems to be largely the same tired old rehashed "Nick Drake was a legendary tortured soul who disappeared in to a world that didnt understand him" nonsense. What everyone seems to forget is that Nic Ok, well may start by saying that while Patrick Humphries is a perfectly competent writer, I thoroughly believe that, (A) He knows nothing about Nick or his music and had absolutely no passion for the man or his music. And (B) He has done little or no research for this book. The content of this book seems to be largely the same tired old rehashed "Nick Drake was a legendary tortured soul who disappeared in to a world that didnt understand him" nonsense. What everyone seems to forget is that Nick was a person like everybody else. And i would say he is one of the few people that actually died before they had a chance to be really massively famous, who actually deserves the adulation they currently recieve today (the other being Jeff Buckley). So in closing i would say that this is obviously a book directed at Nick drake fans, but unless you know absolutely nothing about him, steer well clear of this one, because it wil tell you nothing you didnt already know.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karlie

    I enjoy Nick Drake's music, and I appreciate what Patrick Humphries is trying to do, but I just don't think it works. Unfortunately, Nick Drake's life wasn't all that remarkable. It's sad to think of such a young, talented person dying in such a tragic way, but other than his dramatic death, it doesn't seem like much else went on in his life. His family life was happy, his school career was normal, etc. Add to this the fact that he was rarely interviewed, and we have a book written on what seems I enjoy Nick Drake's music, and I appreciate what Patrick Humphries is trying to do, but I just don't think it works. Unfortunately, Nick Drake's life wasn't all that remarkable. It's sad to think of such a young, talented person dying in such a tragic way, but other than his dramatic death, it doesn't seem like much else went on in his life. His family life was happy, his school career was normal, etc. Add to this the fact that he was rarely interviewed, and we have a book written on what seems like mostly hearsay and 20+ year old memories. There aren't many interesting anecdotes because Nick Drake mostly kept to himself, walked into rooms, drank tea and left. There were a few interesting tidbits, but not much. Again, I really appreciate the effort put into this book, but I don't think it would really be interesting to anyone other than very big Nick Drake fans.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I am a latecomer to Nick Drake, as I imagine most people are. I bought "Five Leaves Left" three years ago and was quite taken with it. His voice is similar to Donovan's but the mood is more brooding. This bio is readable and sheds light on Drake's struggles. After reading it, I listened to his music and shed tears. I also bought his other two CDs.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Larry Queen

    Humphries provides us with a rare, if not complete, insight into the mind of Nick Drake, and his bizarre decline from outgoing young boy to social reclusion and offers interesting insight into his artistic process through the minds of the producers and musicians he worked with — Joe Boyd to Richard Thompson.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anna Chapman

    Really interesting account of a singer who is still relatively unknown to a lot of people. It gave a good insight into his troubles and the enigma that still surrounds his music. A very deep character and consequently quite an interesting personal story to read about.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vern

    very nice book about this British Musician. Very loving tribute. I learned tons about him and have a greater love for the songs and his albums.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Excellent account and insight into Nick's life, although has a tendency to stray off on random, unnecessary tangents

  26. 4 out of 5

    CQM

    A well researched biography of the short lived British folk legend. Bring your hanky though, it isn't a lot of laughs.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    Sad, sad, sad...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeni Treehugger

    This is one of the saddest books I've ever read though it is written beautifully.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rand

    Very good book on a man who left 3 albums behind,as well as very little clues as to what happens to a troubled soul.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    Any bio on Nick Drake is always welcome.

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