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The Harvard Business Review Manager's Handbook: The 17 Skills Leaders Need to Stand Out

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The one primer you need to develop your managerial and leadership skills. Whether you’re a new manager or looking to have more influence in your current management role, the challenges you face come in all shapes and sizes—a direct report’s anxious questions, your boss’s last-minute assignment of an important presentation, or a blank business case staring you in the face. T The one primer you need to develop your managerial and leadership skills. Whether you’re a new manager or looking to have more influence in your current management role, the challenges you face come in all shapes and sizes—a direct report’s anxious questions, your boss’s last-minute assignment of an important presentation, or a blank business case staring you in the face. To reach your full potential in these situations, you need to master a new set of business and personal skills. Packed with step-by-step advice and wisdom from Harvard Business Review’s management archive, the HBR Manager’s Handbook provides best practices on topics from understanding key financial statements and the fundamentals of strategy to emotional intelligence and building your employees’ trust. The book’s brief sections allow you to home in quickly on the solutions you need right away—or take a deeper dive if you need more context. Keep this comprehensive guide with you throughout your career and be a more impactful leader in your organization. In the HBR Manager’s Handbook you’ll find: - Step-by-step guidance through common managerial tasks - Short sections and chapters that you can turn to quickly as a need arises - Self-assessments throughout - Exercises and templates to help you practice and apply the concepts in the book - Concise explanations of the latest research and thinking on important management skills from Harvard Business Review experts such as Dan Goleman, Clayton Christensen, John Kotter, and Michael Porter - Real-life stories from working managers - Recaps and action items at the end of each chapter that allow you to reinforce or review the ideas quickly The skills covered in the book include: - Transitioning into a leadership role - Building trust and credibility - Developing emotional intelligence - Becoming a person of influence - Developing yourself as a leader - Giving effective feedback - Leading teams - Fostering creativity - Mastering the basics of strategy - Learning to use financial tools - Developing a business case


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The one primer you need to develop your managerial and leadership skills. Whether you’re a new manager or looking to have more influence in your current management role, the challenges you face come in all shapes and sizes—a direct report’s anxious questions, your boss’s last-minute assignment of an important presentation, or a blank business case staring you in the face. T The one primer you need to develop your managerial and leadership skills. Whether you’re a new manager or looking to have more influence in your current management role, the challenges you face come in all shapes and sizes—a direct report’s anxious questions, your boss’s last-minute assignment of an important presentation, or a blank business case staring you in the face. To reach your full potential in these situations, you need to master a new set of business and personal skills. Packed with step-by-step advice and wisdom from Harvard Business Review’s management archive, the HBR Manager’s Handbook provides best practices on topics from understanding key financial statements and the fundamentals of strategy to emotional intelligence and building your employees’ trust. The book’s brief sections allow you to home in quickly on the solutions you need right away—or take a deeper dive if you need more context. Keep this comprehensive guide with you throughout your career and be a more impactful leader in your organization. In the HBR Manager’s Handbook you’ll find: - Step-by-step guidance through common managerial tasks - Short sections and chapters that you can turn to quickly as a need arises - Self-assessments throughout - Exercises and templates to help you practice and apply the concepts in the book - Concise explanations of the latest research and thinking on important management skills from Harvard Business Review experts such as Dan Goleman, Clayton Christensen, John Kotter, and Michael Porter - Real-life stories from working managers - Recaps and action items at the end of each chapter that allow you to reinforce or review the ideas quickly The skills covered in the book include: - Transitioning into a leadership role - Building trust and credibility - Developing emotional intelligence - Becoming a person of influence - Developing yourself as a leader - Giving effective feedback - Leading teams - Fostering creativity - Mastering the basics of strategy - Learning to use financial tools - Developing a business case

30 review for The Harvard Business Review Manager's Handbook: The 17 Skills Leaders Need to Stand Out

  1. 4 out of 5

    Toyin A

    The book is divided into 5 parts: 1.Developing a Leader mindset; 2.Managing yourself; 3.Managing Individuals 4.Managing Teams; and 5.Managing the Business. It provides coping mechanisms and strategies to deal with stress. For example, it lists 4 sources of stress (Role strain, Problem-solving fatigue, Isolation and Imposter Syndrome), the symptoms and solutions. There are action items provided at the end of each chapter for the reader to undertake, I particularly like how the book defines Influence as “h The book is divided into 5 parts: 1.Developing a Leader mindset; 2.Managing yourself; 3.Managing Individuals 4.Managing Teams; and 5.Managing the Business. It provides coping mechanisms and strategies to deal with stress. For example, it lists 4 sources of stress (Role strain, Problem-solving fatigue, Isolation and Imposter Syndrome), the symptoms and solutions. There are action items provided at the end of each chapter for the reader to undertake, I particularly like how the book defines Influence as “helping to create positive and productive outcomes for your organisation, with and through other”. Favourite Quote: “People are likely to perceive you as untrustworthy when you clasp your hands, touch your face, cross your arms or lean away from a conversation”. I didn’t know that! Recommendation: This is a definitely a book for all managers and leaders to read. Not only do the action items provide a process for managing/ leading effectively, it is also a go-to guide for people in new positions.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bent Hansen

    If I had read this book before getting into my first managerial position some 10 years ago, I would have run away screaming instead! Talk about pressure... Well, the prestigious Harvard Business Review (HBR) knows stuff about management and leadership (yep, there is a difference!) and tons of other business-related things, and the importance here lies in the subtitle of the book: "The 17 Skills Leaders Need to Stand Out". So of course so can be a mediocre or flat out terrible manager without wor If I had read this book before getting into my first managerial position some 10 years ago, I would have run away screaming instead! Talk about pressure... Well, the prestigious Harvard Business Review (HBR) knows stuff about management and leadership (yep, there is a difference!) and tons of other business-related things, and the importance here lies in the subtitle of the book: "The 17 Skills Leaders Need to Stand Out". So of course so can be a mediocre or flat out terrible manager without working on any of these 17 skills dealt with in this book. The book points at some very important things and takes a point of departure in both classic and new theory on these subjects. My main objection - and the reason why I only give it 4 stars - is that is tries to cover too much, and by doing so, only scratches the surface of all of them. The purpose of the book is most likely to give a brief intro to the 17 skills and lure the reader into buying specific books on the subjects with most relevance to the him or her, which of course is a great marketing plan for HBR but I ended up feeling underwhelmed. To cover so different subjects as making good presentations, hiring and developing talent, understanding financial statements, and writing business cases in less than 340 pages is simply not doable if you want to do it properly. There are some really good points in the book, while other things are downright self-evident, but the bottom line is that HBR is a professional authority on these matters, and if you are a newly appointed manager and you look for a "quick-and-dirty" introduction to which skills to master to become a good manager, this book is a good place to start. The problem is just that it is just that: a place to start; with this book, you only scratch the surface and need a lot more - including on-the-ground experience - to learn more and improve. [An ARC of this book was generously provided by the publisher through NetGalley. The copy was so poorly formatted to the Kindle format that the many tables were almost impossible to read and with word and line divisions at random places. I hope that the real Kindle version is nothing like this, because otherwise you should stick to the printed version of the book!]

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Zapellini

    Great start for aspiring managers. This book covers a lot of ground regarding skills a person should develop to become a new manager or even to improve as a seasoned one. It does not delve deeper into topics, but in the way content is presented, there are always references to other content if the reader feels the need for a more thorough understanding of the subject.

  4. 5 out of 5

    roxi Net

    There are so many resources for new, middle, and veteran managers that it can be overwhelming, but the HBR Manager's Handbook was very interesting to read. It's nice to read that "to succeed, you must compliment the development of your practical skills with inward reflection and an investment in your personal growth" - words that encourage self-reflection and not selfishness. The book breaks down into 5 parts what skills and mind-sets are needed to be an effective leader then how to manage indiv There are so many resources for new, middle, and veteran managers that it can be overwhelming, but the HBR Manager's Handbook was very interesting to read. It's nice to read that "to succeed, you must compliment the development of your practical skills with inward reflection and an investment in your personal growth" - words that encourage self-reflection and not selfishness. The book breaks down into 5 parts what skills and mind-sets are needed to be an effective leader then how to manage individuals, teams, and the business. Having a "Primer" for strategy was fantastic (in "Managing the Business"). Overall, it's a resource that I know I'll be revisiting as needed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donn

    A very practical book, and one that I would recommend to any one who is starting out on managing people. Then again, even those more experienced but wanting to learn "best practices" would be well-advised to read this. It's certainly not very "inspirational", in that it's not the kind of book that makes you want to go out and immediately try its ideas (though there were some in which I did just that). I find it more of a book that you read through once, keep on your shelf, and when a situation a A very practical book, and one that I would recommend to any one who is starting out on managing people. Then again, even those more experienced but wanting to learn "best practices" would be well-advised to read this. It's certainly not very "inspirational", in that it's not the kind of book that makes you want to go out and immediately try its ideas (though there were some in which I did just that). I find it more of a book that you read through once, keep on your shelf, and when a situation arises in which you need to tackle some managerial tasks you pick the book up again to refresh your memory of what exactly it is you should do.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Concise and useful tips for managing people. Good to stay informed as the job market requirements are rapidly changing. Different people have different views on what they see in a good Manager but this book brings them together and creates a universal standard of its own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Midolari

    This book is a gem, very well written with scientific evidence. In my opinion it is not only for new and seasoned managers, but also for aspiring employees who are preparing themselves for management roles. Sadly that not so many people read this kind of books.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Margo Kaestner

    MBA Required Reading - Leading Effective Organizations

  9. 4 out of 5

    Duong Tan

    Simply a good practical book for first time managers.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Vimal Kumar

    lucid, fluid, and informative.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Vishal Patel

    too long compare to other business guide from HBR but definitely worth reading!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adama

    More than a handbook, an invaluable reference book Everything you need to as a manager to work with your team to deliver great results. You don't need to read the book in one go from A-Z. Like me, you can use it as a reference book, go back to it anytime you want, jump to the chapter covering the specific leadership skill you want to apply. There are 16 in total. And what I like above all are the step-by-step guidance with guding questions and case studies. Overall, a good book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steven Kurtz

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Lancaster

  15. 5 out of 5

    Camilla Marra

  16. 4 out of 5

    Geir Skårland

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  19. 4 out of 5

    Julia Myllylä

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Stodghill

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne Millar

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sander

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aki Pohjanen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aydin Musaballi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura McKinney

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rob Moll

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pattie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Teagle

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