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Asterix and the Normans (Pocket Asterix)

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Normans never feel fear—but they do believe that terror literally gives one wings, enabling a person to fly. Now they’re planning to test their theory on Vitalstatistix’s cowardly nephew Jusforkix by pushing him right off the edge of a cliff.


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Normans never feel fear—but they do believe that terror literally gives one wings, enabling a person to fly. Now they’re planning to test their theory on Vitalstatistix’s cowardly nephew Jusforkix by pushing him right off the edge of a cliff.

30 review for Asterix and the Normans (Pocket Asterix)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    This, or Asterix and the Cauldron, is the very first Asterix book I read: and I immediately became a fan. This is one of the books where one of my favourite characters, Cacofonix the village bard, plays a central role. As all Asterix aficionados know, opinion is divided as to his talents - Cacofonix thinks he is a genius, everyone else thinks he is unspeakable. The fearsome Normans, who "don't know the meaning of fear", come to the Gaulish coast to learn it - to their chagrin they meet with Aster This, or Asterix and the Cauldron, is the very first Asterix book I read: and I immediately became a fan. This is one of the books where one of my favourite characters, Cacofonix the village bard, plays a central role. As all Asterix aficionados know, opinion is divided as to his talents - Cacofonix thinks he is a genius, everyone else thinks he is unspeakable. The fearsome Normans, who "don't know the meaning of fear", come to the Gaulish coast to learn it - to their chagrin they meet with Asterix's village of indomitable Gauls, who also don't know it! Well, not everyone;because Justforkix, the Chief's visiting nephew from Lutetia, is very much an expert in fear as far as the Normans are concerned. So they kidnap him. The only way to get the boy back alive is to teach the Normans the meaning of fear. The situation seems hopeless until Cacofonix steps in and gives them a concert. Within hours, the Normans don't learn only fear - they graduate to sheer nail-biting terror. -------------------------------- Well, here's another guy on whose musical talents opinion is divided. (Well, they don't tie and gag me, but of late in our college alumni meetings I see that they never give me the microphone.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    This graphic album was a great find from a pile of clearance books at National Book Store in Centrio. There were a few other Asterix titles on sale but this was the only one was by it original creators Rene Goscinny and Albert Uderzo. It was at half-price off so it was very hard not to buy. Despite it being half-price off, truth be told, I was hesitating to getting it. It is not that I don't enjoy Franco-Belgian comics, I enjoy Herge's Tintin and Peyo's Smurfs. It was that the first few Asterix I This graphic album was a great find from a pile of clearance books at National Book Store in Centrio. There were a few other Asterix titles on sale but this was the only one was by it original creators Rene Goscinny and Albert Uderzo. It was at half-price off so it was very hard not to buy. Despite it being half-price off, truth be told, I was hesitating to getting it. It is not that I don't enjoy Franco-Belgian comics, I enjoy Herge's Tintin and Peyo's Smurfs. It was that the first few Asterix I read I didn't quite get the European style of humor. But that changed with this volume. I thought the premise was idiotic, Vikings who wanted to know the meaning of fear. They were not even called Vikings here but Normans and although Normans may be related to Vikings, they didn't settle in France a few centuries later. Although since the word "Norman" actually means "northman" it was technically correct to refer to them here as Normans. Another plot involved the city kid that is Asterix's chief's nephew. His father was worried that Justforkix was getting soft, sent him to Asterix's village to grow up a little. I was initially puzzled how this two plots would merge as the story ends but it does beautifully. I thought it was corny at first but I ended up laughing at tbe last few pages as the graphic album winded down. It also helped that Uderzo has just a great comic style that blended seamlessly with Goscinny's plots and words. This volume helped make me a believer. It was plain to see why Goscinny and Uderzo were considered legends of Franco-Belgian comics.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    My fav Asterix of all times <3

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Resistance to modernism 29 September 2012 Once again this entire adventure takes place in the little village we know so well. One of Chief Vitalstatistix's nephews has been sent from Lutetia (Paris) out to Amorica to toughen him up, and as it turns out he comes across as one of those young people who do not understand the concept of work. He arrives in a sporty chariot (made in Milan, which made me think of the Ferarri) and in a way brings the idea of the city life out to the country. However, th Resistance to modernism 29 September 2012 Once again this entire adventure takes place in the little village we know so well. One of Chief Vitalstatistix's nephews has been sent from Lutetia (Paris) out to Amorica to toughen him up, and as it turns out he comes across as one of those young people who do not understand the concept of work. He arrives in a sporty chariot (made in Milan, which made me think of the Ferarri) and in a way brings the idea of the city life out to the country. However, the album is more than this because way up north in Scandanavia the Norsemen, who are the Normans, want to learn the meaning of fear so that they might be able to fly, so they jump in a boat and sail to a random place (which happens to be this little village we know so well) to find out all about fear. There are quite a few jokes about Normans and conquests here, and a part of me when I read this album about ten years ago thought it was wrong. However (and I have not researched this) I suspect that the Normans originally were Vikings that during the period of the Viking invasions, came and settled in the region known now as Normandy. The Vikings actually did that quite a lot. There was a period of English history when the Danes pretty much controlled a large chunk of central England which, at the time, was called the Dane Law. Further, there are a number of jokes about how the Normans were not actually supposed to arrive for a few centuries yet. Now, I understand that Asterix is not necessarily supposed to be historically accurate, but one thing that it is is satire. As I read this one I came to understand what the whole basis of these albums are supposed to be. As I said, it is not necessarily political or social criticism but rather satire. The idea that I came across is that struggle that exists between the pastoral idealism of the country and the modernising influence of the city. Where the little village we know so well reflects the tranquil idealism of the country, the Romans reflect the modernising influence that is rolling out over our world. Many of us on the modernising side like to see our ideas as being progress, however being on the intellectual, university trained side we fail to see the pleasant aspects of a rural setting where things do not change and have not changed for years. For instance we have the green grass, the singing birds, the communal feasts, and the general aspect where everybody knows everybody else. However there tends to be a resistance among such places against the modernising influence, as can be represented by Cacofonix the bard. The truth is that it is not that Cacofonix is playing modern music, it is simply that he cannot sing and cannot play music at all. When the Lutetian tells him that he will be a hit in Lutetia, it is not because he is any good, it is more because the variety of tastes that come about in the big city will mean that people will actually come to see that maybe this person that cannot play music for the life of him is simply somebody who is experimenting and trying something new.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Mortada

    Fear is essential and vital to know your strength limits of you abilities Also this the first volume where Cacofonix is not beaten at the last page

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mansi Nayyar

    Asterix and Obliex series are the best !! So much content, such a comic language, intricate detailing in very square of the story ... one can imagine how much effort they must have put to create these gems. I like all of them but Asterix and the Legionary and this one - Asterix and the Normans are my favorite out of favourites. I keep repeating many lines aloud when I read Asterix comics as the flow of words is magical.

  7. 5 out of 5

    it'chy

    cacofonix gets back on fulliautomatix! well, sort of i was supposed to cram in these asterix books to meet my 53-book challenge for 2014 better luck next time, slacker (me) happy new year to everyone

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Why would you go to Asterix to find out what fear was? But the best thing about this series is the fact that Asterix has intelligence.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gokul

    Asterix, Obelix and Cacofonix(!) teach a bunch of fearless Normans the meaning of fear and give them wings to fly. Talk about sonic weapons! The Normans leave after promising to return in a few centuries. Along the way they also make a man out of the slacking rocker of a nephew of Vitalstatistix whose rock music is much more appreciated than poor Cacofonix's - who does get his due credit at the customary banquet in the end with FullyAutomatix gagged and bound instead. Read it on https://archive.or Asterix, Obelix and Cacofonix(!) teach a bunch of fearless Normans the meaning of fear and give them wings to fly. Talk about sonic weapons! The Normans leave after promising to return in a few centuries. Along the way they also make a man out of the slacking rocker of a nephew of Vitalstatistix whose rock music is much more appreciated than poor Cacofonix's - who does get his due credit at the customary banquet in the end with FullyAutomatix gagged and bound instead. Read it on https://archive.org/stream/asterixnor...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jc

    the scary normans meet their match with asterix and friends.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Astérix et les Normands - René Goscinny Rating: ★★ Review coming soon!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben Fitchew

    Asterix and the normans Great book love the author all the other books are amazing looking and the only reason it would have been a five star rating is

  13. 4 out of 5

    Francis Pellow

    a different feel to this one. enjoyable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jael

    Cool

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luis Tormento

    The story begins with Vitalstatistix receiving a missive from his brother Doublehelix in Lutetia (Paris), to ask for the education of Doublehelix's teenage son, Justforkix. Justforkix then arrives in a sports car-like chariot. The village holds a dance in honour of his arrival; but he is unimpressed by the traditional way of dancing, snatches Cacofonix's lyre, and sings and plays in the manner of Elvix Preslix (the Rolling Menhirs in the English version). Some of the younger villagers dance to t The story begins with Vitalstatistix receiving a missive from his brother Doublehelix in Lutetia (Paris), to ask for the education of Doublehelix's teenage son, Justforkix. Justforkix then arrives in a sports car-like chariot. The village holds a dance in honour of his arrival; but he is unimpressed by the traditional way of dancing, snatches Cacofonix's lyre, and sings and plays in the manner of Elvix Preslix (the Rolling Menhirs in the English version). Some of the younger villagers dance to this new form; but Cacofonix tries to show off his own skills, and is struck down by Fulliautomatix. Justforkix thereupon suggests that Cacofonix's talents would be better appreciated in Lutetia. Meanwhile, a Norman crew arrive in Gaul to discover "the meaning of fear", on grounds that they are fearless to the point of not understanding the concept, but have heard of people "flying in fear", and believe that being afraid will grant them the ability to fly. Most of the Gauls welcome the chance of a fight; but Justforkix is horrified and decides to return home. Viewing Justforkix as an expert in fear, the Normans kidnap him to teach them; but this fails, and he remains their prisoner until Asterix and Obelix come to the rescue. A small Roman patrol is also involved in the resulting fight. At length, Norman chief Timandahaf orders an end to the battle and explains his mission to the Gauls. To teach the Normans fear, Asterix sends Obelix to fetch Cacofonix, while himself remaining as a hostage. When Obelix reaches the village, he finds Cacofonix gone to perform in Lutetia, and pursues him through a series of tell-tale clues. Meanwhile, Timandahaf becomes impatient and tries to force Justforkix to teach the secret of flight by tossing him off a cliff. Just before this can be carried out, Asterix challenges the Norman warriors; and seeing him surrounded, Justforkix gains the courage to fight as well — albeit to no visible effect. Obelix and Cacofonix stop the fight, and Cacofonix's discordant songs are exhibited to the Normans, which provokes their first real fear, and an immediate retreat to their homeland. When Asterix questions the Normans' interest in fear, Getafix replies that courage is achieved only by having first been afraid, and superseding the fear to the desired effect. Thereafter Justforkix is claimed to have gained courage himself, and the story ends with the customary banquet, but with Cacofonix as guest of honour and Fulliautomatix tied up, with his ears filled with parsley. Text extracted from Wikipedia

  16. 4 out of 5

    Krishna Kumar

    The blood-thirsty Norsemen have a problem. They don’t know what fear is and since they pride themselves on knowing everything, they must learn fear. Besides, “fear lends you wings”, so by learning fear, Normans can fly like birds. So they set out to find someone who can teach them fear and by random, pick up Gaul and specifically the beach near our Gaulish village to go about their task. Our Gaulish villagers do not know fear either, but luckily for the Normans, the Gauls have a visitor from Lut The blood-thirsty Norsemen have a problem. They don’t know what fear is and since they pride themselves on knowing everything, they must learn fear. Besides, “fear lends you wings”, so by learning fear, Normans can fly like birds. So they set out to find someone who can teach them fear and by random, pick up Gaul and specifically the beach near our Gaulish village to go about their task. Our Gaulish villagers do not know fear either, but luckily for the Normans, the Gauls have a visitor from Lutetia, young Justforkix, who may be able to help them. The authors have a lot of fun in this book. Justforkix doesn’t like Cacofonix’s music and uses his harp to belt out the latest tunes from Lutetia, but unexpectedly, it turns out he likes Cacofonix’s songs, exactly the opposite of the Gaul villagers. Remember the book was written in 1967. Cacofonix, who is among my favorite characters, has a big role in this story and in the final scene gets to sit at the table while his nemesis, Fulliautomatix, is bound and tied to a tree. The Normans’s behavior at the end makes them move to the evil part of the evil versus stupid spectrum of the Asterix villains gallery, along with the Goths from the third volume. The best part of the book is the character of Justforkix. Although the author’s loyalties lie with the villagers, they make a very sympathetic character out of Justforkix. An instance: Justforkix taking the menhir with him back home.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dominick

    This one has grown on me. I first read it much later than I read most of the earlier other albums, so when I got to it, it seemed somewhat stale, I think, merely because I was familiar with the formula. And admittedly, some of the English puns here are a tad more strained than normal. Nevertheless, this play on the old folk tale of the man who doesn't know the meaning of the word fear, so goes looking to discover what fear is--transferred, here, to fearless Normans wanting to understand this phe This one has grown on me. I first read it much later than I read most of the earlier other albums, so when I got to it, it seemed somewhat stale, I think, merely because I was familiar with the formula. And admittedly, some of the English puns here are a tad more strained than normal. Nevertheless, this play on the old folk tale of the man who doesn't know the meaning of the word fear, so goes looking to discover what fear is--transferred, here, to fearless Normans wanting to understand this phenomenon because fear allows you to fly--has a great many very funny moments--including a sculling joke I don't think I got until this most recent reading. All the expected elements are here (including not one but two appearances by the pirates--in a grand total of two panels that more or less bookend the adventure), as well as some surprises, such as a rare success for Cacofonix. Uderzo's art is especially supple, and subtle (Insofar as this style can be subtle), especially in his depiction of dance. But there are some dandy large-sized setting panels that are just a joy to look at. Overall, a strong entry in the series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Callie

    I recently read a few books from the series Asterix. It’s about how Asterix and Obelix go on adventures with all walks of life. These characters are known as Gauls, a certain ethnic group in northern Europe. I found these actually quite funny, and really interesting, considering I do not even really enjoy comics. The illustrations were the same through out each book in the collection, which completely amazes me. Although they can seem a little childish, they have worldly jokes that most children I recently read a few books from the series Asterix. It’s about how Asterix and Obelix go on adventures with all walks of life. These characters are known as Gauls, a certain ethnic group in northern Europe. I found these actually quite funny, and really interesting, considering I do not even really enjoy comics. The illustrations were the same through out each book in the collection, which completely amazes me. Although they can seem a little childish, they have worldly jokes that most children would not really enjoy (or maybe I’m just a nerd) and they have a more built up plot than children’s comic. The favorite book that I read out of the Asterix series is “Asterix and The Normans”. I like it because this book keeps you wanting to continue reading, it get the reader really involved. The illustrations are perfect. It is when the mayor’s nephew comes for a visit to become a man. But during his vacation, the Gauls have another visitor, the Normans. They come to learn about fear, considering they do not have any.. I really recommend the Asterix Series!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tim Roast

    This is the ninth Asterix adventure and this time Asterix meets the Normans. Justforkix is the nephew of the village chief Vitalstatistix and is sent to the village from his native Lutetia (Paris) because he is soft and needs toughening up. Obelix suggests thumping him but Asterix disagrees. Meanwhile the Norman chief is concerned that his Normans don't know the meaning of fear so goes off to Gaul in search of it. Unfortunately the village they end up at is Asterix's village and they also don't k This is the ninth Asterix adventure and this time Asterix meets the Normans. Justforkix is the nephew of the village chief Vitalstatistix and is sent to the village from his native Lutetia (Paris) because he is soft and needs toughening up. Obelix suggests thumping him but Asterix disagrees. Meanwhile the Norman chief is concerned that his Normans don't know the meaning of fear so goes off to Gaul in search of it. Unfortunately the village they end up at is Asterix's village and they also don't know the meaning of fear. It's just as well Justforkix is there, "an expert on fear". Along the way there is a lot of fun and jokes, from start ("Why, there's Postaldistrix the postman!") to finish. There is a kidnapping in the book too, which features in a lot of Asterix stories, but all-in-all another great Asterix story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Teucer

    Asterix stands alongside Tintin as one of the giants of the Franco-Belgian comics tradition, and it has a certain charm, like Tintin. It has a clear, expressive art style, a cast of amusing, iconic characters, and the serialised approach to narrative gives it a rollicking pace. The writing's unremarkable, though: every issue is essentially a remix of the same elements, which I suppose is part of the appeal. The humour is restrained to puns and cartoon violence, with a little satire on the side. Asterix stands alongside Tintin as one of the giants of the Franco-Belgian comics tradition, and it has a certain charm, like Tintin. It has a clear, expressive art style, a cast of amusing, iconic characters, and the serialised approach to narrative gives it a rollicking pace. The writing's unremarkable, though: every issue is essentially a remix of the same elements, which I suppose is part of the appeal. The humour is restrained to puns and cartoon violence, with a little satire on the side. The characters and plotting are all very simple and unadventurous. It has a nice flavour -- it's just not very filling.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex Poovathingal

    Normans don't know fear. This, they consider to be a serious drawback as it is impossible to cure hiccups. More importantly, they have heard that fear lends you wings and flying is the only art they haven't mastered. They set out on a journey to master the art of fear. However the destination they chose is a small Gaulish village of Asterix and Obelix where again no one knows fear. Luckily for the Normans, these Gaul's have guest amongst them from a different country who happen to know a great d Normans don't know fear. This, they consider to be a serious drawback as it is impossible to cure hiccups. More importantly, they have heard that fear lends you wings and flying is the only art they haven't mastered. They set out on a journey to master the art of fear. However the destination they chose is a small Gaulish village of Asterix and Obelix where again no one knows fear. Luckily for the Normans, these Gaul's have guest amongst them from a different country who happen to know a great deal about fear. It's now upto the Gauls to teach Normans about fear.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rashmi

    The Normans don't know what is fear, so they set out to learn the meaning of fear. Our Gaulish village has a young spunky visitor in the form of, Justforkix, Chief Vitalstatix's nephew, who is sent to Gaul so that they can 'make a man out of him'. Life in Gaul goes on as usual - fights, celebrations, boar hunting, delivering menhirs. The Normans land up at the shores of our little Gaulish village. The Normans learn the meaning of fear, Justforkix conquers his fear, Cacofonix has his two minutes The Normans don't know what is fear, so they set out to learn the meaning of fear. Our Gaulish village has a young spunky visitor in the form of, Justforkix, Chief Vitalstatix's nephew, who is sent to Gaul so that they can 'make a man out of him'. Life in Gaul goes on as usual - fights, celebrations, boar hunting, delivering menhirs. The Normans land up at the shores of our little Gaulish village. The Normans learn the meaning of fear, Justforkix conquers his fear, Cacofonix has his two minutes of fame and Gauls get what they love best - a chance to bash up!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rollie Reid

    This is one of the few that I have read in both French and English. In fact, I own it in both French and English. It is hilarious, with its take on a modern young man travelling to the hinterland. Now, understand, it is 50BC, and by modern I mean merely that he comes from Paris, that thriving metropolis...of 50BC. Just remember that if you go to Norman Heaven, you get to eat the food of the gods, crème a la crème. Read it and see.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    The mailman is Postaldistrix. The chief's brother is Doublehelix. The nephew is Justforkix. The chief is Olaf Timandahaf. The Normans want to know what fear is and they hope the Gauls will be able to teach them the meaning of the word. Obviously, they haven't heard the village Bard sing, and that's the secret weapon of the village that will teach the Normans the true meaning of fear. Be afraid. Be very afraid.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    A rare early series flop by the creators, not a turkey at all but a big missed opportunity for a better story. Still a good middling read but compared to the others of the period, a let down. They have some great guest characters but not much plot or inspiration to do much with them. Vikings briefly return in another below average book later, rare lapses by writer Gosginy who was usually brimful of plot invention.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karhum Ghassan

    This book was kind of boring a bit at the beginning but it became better at the end the Normans wanted to know everything in the whole world good for them now they know after the Gauls taught them a good lesson and the most thing i liked that Vitalastix the chief his nephew knew the meaning of fear and he was the most scared from the Normans in all of Gaul and at the end he made Normans fear most.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    A hilarious Asterix entry, this time introducing the Normans and the Gauls’ attempts to toughen up the snobbish, effeminate nephew of Vitalstatistix. The Normans invade Gaul in order to learn the meaning of fear (literally). Along the way we get a repetitive but funny parody of Norman cuisine (any meat with creme sauce).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dimitri

    Asterix and Obelix are supposed teach a soft youngster from Paris how to be a real man. In the meantime, a Viking 'scientific' expedition whose purpose is to discover the meaning of fear lands near the village.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Asterix the Normans – teenaged Justforkix helps teach the Norse the true meaning of fear. Extremely clever investigation into the psychology of thrill-seeking

  30. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    AWESOME!!! There is nothing that comes close to Asterix - I have the whole series, both on e-books and hard-copy and they are some of most treasured possessions. I grew up with them and they are simply the best!

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