Hot Best Seller

Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running

Availability: Ready to download

More than 11 million women run regularly, a number that's growing every year. They tend to be educated and affluent-the perfect audience for Sole Sisters.Half of all runners are women, and they are changing the face of the sport. It's a social outlet, a healthful way to improve mental well-being, and an opportunity to form bonds with like-minded women.Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is a grwomen.SoleSisters.Half More than 11 million women run regularly, a number that's growing every year. They tend to be educated and affluent-the perfect audience for Sole Sisters.Half of all runners are women, and they are changing the face of the sport. It's a social outlet, a healthful way to improve mental well-being, and an opportunity to form bonds with like-minded women.Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is a gripping collection of stories that captures the inspirational heart of the women's running. Authors Jennifer Lin and Susan Warner have interviewed women of all ages from all walks of life and all parts of the country. All of their subjects have one thing in common: Running has transformed them. There are both heartrending stories of grief and survival and lighthearted tales of friendship. Among them are:* Sisters who competed in a 5K race to honor a sister who survived breast cancer.* A 9/11 widow who ran her first marathon to honor the memory of her husband. * A 65-year-old woman who overcame obesity and alcoholism to finish the grueling Ironman triathlon.* An unknown runner from Norway named Grete Waitz who decided to run a marathon-and changed the face of the sport.Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is not just for women who run. It appeals to all women who know what it means to have the support of others who share their trials and triumphs. Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is sometimes touching, sometimes funny, and always inspiring.


Compare

More than 11 million women run regularly, a number that's growing every year. They tend to be educated and affluent-the perfect audience for Sole Sisters.Half of all runners are women, and they are changing the face of the sport. It's a social outlet, a healthful way to improve mental well-being, and an opportunity to form bonds with like-minded women.Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is a grwomen.SoleSisters.Half More than 11 million women run regularly, a number that's growing every year. They tend to be educated and affluent-the perfect audience for Sole Sisters.Half of all runners are women, and they are changing the face of the sport. It's a social outlet, a healthful way to improve mental well-being, and an opportunity to form bonds with like-minded women.Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is a gripping collection of stories that captures the inspirational heart of the women's running. Authors Jennifer Lin and Susan Warner have interviewed women of all ages from all walks of life and all parts of the country. All of their subjects have one thing in common: Running has transformed them. There are both heartrending stories of grief and survival and lighthearted tales of friendship. Among them are:* Sisters who competed in a 5K race to honor a sister who survived breast cancer.* A 9/11 widow who ran her first marathon to honor the memory of her husband. * A 65-year-old woman who overcame obesity and alcoholism to finish the grueling Ironman triathlon.* An unknown runner from Norway named Grete Waitz who decided to run a marathon-and changed the face of the sport.Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is not just for women who run. It appeals to all women who know what it means to have the support of others who share their trials and triumphs. Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running is sometimes touching, sometimes funny, and always inspiring.

30 review for Sole Sisters: Stories of Women and Running

  1. 4 out of 5

    Robynne

    In the end, I would rather hear stories about average runners racing in average races with average finish times.....those are the runners that truly inspire me. Running a sub 3 or even 4 hour marathon is great and deserves massive amounts of credit. But those that do it in 5, 6, or even 8 hours are the ones that move me to tears when I watch them finish. Those are my hero's.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Evans

    An quick and inspiring read about woman and the power of running. The book presents a total of twenty-one stories from women from various walks of life expressing the impact running has brought to their lives. Out of all the stories in this book, my favorite was "On the faded trail of Chief Dull Knife" by Cinnamon Spear in that the female on the story shares her experience in running freezing temperatures in Montana to retrace the journey performed by the Cheyenne over a century ago. After readi An quick and inspiring read about woman and the power of running. The book presents a total of twenty-one stories from women from various walks of life expressing the impact running has brought to their lives. Out of all the stories in this book, my favorite was "On the faded trail of Chief Dull Knife" by Cinnamon Spear in that the female on the story shares her experience in running freezing temperatures in Montana to retrace the journey performed by the Cheyenne over a century ago. After reading this book, it remains me of how running can be viewed as more as exercise, it can also be therapeutic as well as help deal with grief. Whether these women are walking, jogging, or running, it's comforting to know that they use running as a way to find or reclaim themselves and well as create and reach goals which is also the main reasons I run as well. The only thing that would've like at the end of the book was a list of resources for women looking for running groups or companies that make running clothes for women.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    I was given this book as a gift and absolutely loved it! Great read for any runner - especially women!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julie Arthur

    This book was a gift from one of my dear running friends, so I really wanted to love it and I was expecting a lot of inspiring stories that would make me want to go out and run 20 miles right now. Instead what I got was some lackluster writing and some passages that could have been inspiring if they were not so poorly written. Some were interesting, like the lady who runs with her horses, but I wanted more from this collection of running experiences. The writing is shallow and emotionless for mo This book was a gift from one of my dear running friends, so I really wanted to love it and I was expecting a lot of inspiring stories that would make me want to go out and run 20 miles right now. Instead what I got was some lackluster writing and some passages that could have been inspiring if they were not so poorly written. Some were interesting, like the lady who runs with her horses, but I wanted more from this collection of running experiences. The writing is shallow and emotionless for most of the book and there were several things I found downright offensive. For example, in one passage there is this sentence: "Marilyn got so good at running that she decided to join Susan in a local 5k race". First of all, this is the least complex sentence on the planet (See: the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog). Second, you don't have to be "good" at running to run a 5k. Anybody who wants to run a 5k can go out and run one anytime they want. I'm not sure how a sentence that implies you have to be "good" before you can be a runner is supposed to inspire the reader. Another example is a direct quote that was included in one of the entries. The quote is in reference to a group running a race and having people jump in from the sidelines to run: "Sometimes it can be dangerous. We're running a six minute pace and somebody who weights 200 lbs just jumps in front of us". I understand that this is a direct quote and the authors can't control what someone says, but why put this in there at all? This makes it seem like there's no way anyone who weighs 200 lbs could ever keep up with these people in a race. True, I may not have been able to keep a 6-min pace several years ago when I weighed 200 lbs, but it's kind of shitty to assume someone can't be fast just because of their weight. ANYWAY. The moral of my review is this: I found this book to be very uninspiring, especially for someone who is just starting out running or who may not be comfortable with their physical appearance. Many of the stories are about elite runners or women who run at an elite level. I would have preferred some more emotional, touching stories about "normal" women.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Badschnoodles

    Full disclosure: I didn’t read all the stories. I read 3/4 of them. They’re a bit samey - Woman hasn’t run for years, is maybe even (heaven forfend!) a bit fat but then goes out for a run, drops 15 pounds and either wins the race or sets some kinda record, or both. I’ve no doubt they’re all true but I am much more interested in ordinary stories about women who just love to run.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Cute book with short non connected chapters made for a good read when the kids were playing outside.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Cunningham

    The book is a compilation of blog posts. It doesn't flow very well but the information is good.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    Fun true short stories

  9. 4 out of 5

    Calamus

    Ranging from a running group for Mom’s-Only to a late-blooming Olympian to a cancer survivor embarking on a 5K run with her sisters, Sole Stories is a collection of short essays that are engaging and inspiring. The women’s stories invoke a sisterhood mentality without becoming too clichéd—thankfully no bonding sessions over chocolate, wine, and shoe shopping. Instead, Lin and Warner show how running can be used as a conduit to friendships, discovering unknown strengths, and dealing with our demo Ranging from a running group for Mom’s-Only to a late-blooming Olympian to a cancer survivor embarking on a 5K run with her sisters, Sole Stories is a collection of short essays that are engaging and inspiring. The women’s stories invoke a sisterhood mentality without becoming too clichéd—thankfully no bonding sessions over chocolate, wine, and shoe shopping. Instead, Lin and Warner show how running can be used as a conduit to friendships, discovering unknown strengths, and dealing with our demons. For some, the running route becomes a confessional. Trudging along next to someone, all eyes straight ahead, with few distractions, “…running was like truth serum.” For other women, the run is a way to escape and to get their heads back on straight, “It was not so much a runner’s high as a runner’s clarity.” The familiar routes and repetitious movements allowed time to clear the mind of all the day’s clutter. Of course, running doesn’t have to be so serious all the time for everyone. Every year, in San Francisco, 13 women bungee cord themselves together to run in the “centipede division” of the annual Bay to Breakers race. A nun who took it 2 miles at a time on a whim eventually found herself sponsored by Nike and running in the first women’s Olympic Marathon Trials. Ellen Wessel created Moving Comfort clothing line because she just wanted a damn pair of shorts that fit! I really enjoyed reading this collection and appreciate the lengths that Lin and Warner went to reflect women’s stories from all across the country and from every age group and level of running. The book is short and sweet and is a nice collection for the avid competitive runner to beginner. www.calamusworks.com/blog

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carianne Carleo-Evangelist

    A really nice collection of stories about women who run. The most inspiring to me as a novice runner was that these women are of all ages, abilities. Some of their stories, like Sister Marion, I've heard of through other channels and others (Shalane Flanagan and Catherine Ndereba) are well known, but all were interesting. A solid, quick read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    TK

    I was hoping for more. Now, granted, I am a tough critic because of my publishing insider status, so I'm jaded and suspect of pretty much any book that comes with a concept of a theme. However, I thought my skepticism of a collection of essays about women bonding through running would be balanced out by my own passion for running, and the romantic view I admittedly have of the sport, as both participant and spectator. Alas, that was not quite the case. I started reading SOLE SISTERS s I was hoping for more. Now, granted, I am a tough critic because of my publishing insider status, so I'm jaded and suspect of pretty much any book that comes with a concept of a theme. However, I thought my skepticism of a collection of essays about women bonding through running would be balanced out by my own passion for running, and the romantic view I admittedly have of the sport, as both participant and spectator. Alas, that was not quite the case. I started reading SOLE SISTERS several months ago, when I was training for the Disney World Marathon, but didn't pick it up again until this week, when I decided to approach it like a point-to-point run and Just Read It. Unfortunately, after about four essays, the stories of these real women began to blur together. Most of the women profiled were running through some traumatic event, and they leaned on the support of their all-women running groups to get through it. Perhaps these stories would have been inspirational if read one at a time, bit by bit. The essays that were most interesting to me were the ones that focused on elite and champion runners. I loved learning more about Joan Nesbit Mabe, Cheryl Treworgy, Grete Waitz and Catherine Ndereba and her sister. The awared of rthe Quirkiest Runner goes to Colleen Cannon, who runs flanked by her two horses.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I devoured this book in about two hours. It's short and a quick read, but running is also one of those topics that I just tend to fly through. I really do wish it had been longer though! This book consisted of stories of different real-life women runners, from elite world-record-setting marathon runners to middle-aged recovering addict moms. There was even a 7-year-old girl in one of the stories (who seemed to have an impressive natural talent even at that young age). I enjoyed hearing different I devoured this book in about two hours. It's short and a quick read, but running is also one of those topics that I just tend to fly through. I really do wish it had been longer though! This book consisted of stories of different real-life women runners, from elite world-record-setting marathon runners to middle-aged recovering addict moms. There was even a 7-year-old girl in one of the stories (who seemed to have an impressive natural talent even at that young age). I enjoyed hearing different people's perspectives on what running has given them--generally along the lines of "me time," and time for introspection and soul-searching. One of my favorite anecdotes was about two Kenyan running sisters. Apparently, their school was 3 miles away, and there was no school bus and no other way to get there, so they both ran the 3 miles to school every morning, ran home for lunch (because there was no cafeteria like we have), ran back to school, and then ran home. So, 12 miles every day, and these were young schoolchildren. I almost wonder if this is often the root cause of so many great African runners--necessity (i.e. no other way to get to school)? Anyway I was struck by that. The stories vary a great deal, and it seems like most runners (male or female) would probably find it interesting.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I've been reading a chapter or two each night for a few weeks now as a way of inspiring myself to get back into running. Each of the stories in this book are inspiring, but not in the way I expected. I guess I expected more "running did such and such for me," but what I took away from it was the beauty of female friendship through running. However, there was definitely a lot of "running did such and such for me," and yes, I am inspired to get back to running. This is an easy read, an I've been reading a chapter or two each night for a few weeks now as a way of inspiring myself to get back into running. Each of the stories in this book are inspiring, but not in the way I expected. I guess I expected more "running did such and such for me," but what I took away from it was the beauty of female friendship through running. However, there was definitely a lot of "running did such and such for me," and yes, I am inspired to get back to running. This is an easy read, an inspiring read, and if you read it, I suggest you read it the way I did - one story at a time, so you can savor each chapter. I hope the authors write more books like this. I really liked it. I stumbled across this book by happy accident. From this book, I found some others, which I plan to read, such as "Run Like a Girl."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    I really want to get back into running. So I keep picking up these motivational running books about women. This one consists of several short-short stories about different women runners. The first story talks about two women who became friends and running partners. One had not run for 17 years and was now 34 years old and became an awesome runner. I haven't run for over 30 years, and it really does seem impossible to get there. I can barely jog -- and at the present I am a bit down as my back ha I really want to get back into running. So I keep picking up these motivational running books about women. This one consists of several short-short stories about different women runners. The first story talks about two women who became friends and running partners. One had not run for 17 years and was now 34 years old and became an awesome runner. I haven't run for over 30 years, and it really does seem impossible to get there. I can barely jog -- and at the present I am a bit down as my back has not healed from a summer injury yet. I don't like being old and how long it takes to get better. I realize that riding my bike is much easier for me, but I really would like to run. Maybe I can join a beginners "Running Grandma's" group?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jodi

    What a great book. It is filled with many stories about women who have never ran who have come together and have found a passion and friendship. The book was a great inspiration at really reminded me of all the woman I have helped to start in running over the years. I never really thought about, but I was always the runner who never wanted a partner, but always seemed to have one. Woman were always there asking to run and I always accepted. They have come and gone in my life, but I will never fo What a great book. It is filled with many stories about women who have never ran who have come together and have found a passion and friendship. The book was a great inspiration at really reminded me of all the woman I have helped to start in running over the years. I never really thought about, but I was always the runner who never wanted a partner, but always seemed to have one. Woman were always there asking to run and I always accepted. They have come and gone in my life, but I will never forget the look in their eyes when they complete their first 5k or mini-trialathon. What an amazing gift to see these women reach their goals and get to know themselves. These is a great book for anyone that runs or knows a female runner.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    This book captured the idea that running has a greater psychological meaning. It is more than keeping fit, but the psychological benefits of running and the connection that it provides with other human beings is power and creates empathy and community. What this book didn’t do wonderfully was tell a larger running story. No transitions and nothing that really sticks out afterward. It is a book you can quickly read and then forget about. For a full review visit http://ireadalotofbooks.com/sole-sist...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    Inspiring stories about running females. You learn about one of the centipedes in the Bay to Breakers run; a woman who runs with her horses and a whole lot of women who never ran in their life and suddenly after a divorce or a serious illness they decide to take it up and, damn it all, if they don't win the very first marathon they enter AND go on to compete in the Olympics. A Christmas present from MA.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I read this book to balance the extremely dry reading of a education book I was plodding through. Sole Sisters is the running equivalent to all those "Chicken Soup for the Soul" books. The short stories were quick reads. Some were inspirational, some I could relate to, and some reminded me that elite runners are regular people too. Not great writing, but something that definitely kept me engaged (or at least more engaged than that boring education book).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Moberg Diaz

    Short, sweet read chalk full of endearing tales of what running has meant to a variety of women in their individual life journeys. I love a story about a strong woman, reading about the struggles and victories of these amazing women who blazed the trails for others. Really inspiring, I only wish it was longer and that the tales encompassed a wider range of women runners and not just the elite runners. Really loved the theme of sisterhood in this book though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jane M

    Quick and fun read Good way to pass a few hours and/or get inspired for your next run. Could be read straight through or one story at a time. I enjoyed each of the individual stories, although some of them were dangerously close to the "inspiration porn" category. I was a bigger fan of the overall impact and the message that running can be a sport that bands women together regardless of speed or competitiveness.

  21. 5 out of 5

    momruncraft

    Fun collection of short stories. I found some of the stories hard to really relate to as a "bad day mile of 5 MINUTES" is not something that will ever be in my vocabulary. The daily challenges and training obstacles faced by each woman throughout the book were truly inspiring: running to commemorate breast cancer survival, running professional series races only months after giving birth, starting a running group (aptly named "SeeJaneRun") for new moms... Fast, fun, easy read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    I got this book on my Kindle. I can't remember why, but I think it's because of the subject matter. This book is made up of chapters that are about all kinds of female runners. The stories are short and formulaic and somewhat inspirational. The writing was not all that good. There was no flow or "voice" in the writing. It read as something amateur, like a student's work. I went ahead and finished it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    B

    good read... not sure what i was expecting, but it was basically a series of nice articles - all encouraging, feel-good etc. almost too much good stuff to read all the way through...felt like there should be a technical article between the heart warming stories to cleanse the palette a bit and make me appreciate them all :)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lesley Looper

    By and large, I enjoyed the stories in the book. I especially enjoyed learning more about runners like Grete Waitz and Joan Benoit, as well as some of the stories about running groups. Some of the themes were a bit predictable, but others were more unique. Still, I enjoy reading running stories, and this is a nice collection.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A set of short stories about women who run. What I loved is that they wern't all athletes and some had come from not being able to get off the couch to completing marathons. After a bad run early in the week, this book has helped me realise that I'm not too fat to run and that even those who run all the time have a bad day. Just what I needed.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Deidre

    Short, sweet, to-the-point. There's nothing magical about this book, really. It's just a collection of stories about women in running, which, while relatable, seem short and not that fulfilling. Still, good for a short burst of feminine drive. As a mom, runner, and struggler throigh life, I enjoyed it and felt good stuff happen.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I LOVED this book!!! It is just short stories about women runners. Very inspirational stories from young to old. Great motivation to get me back out on the road!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jess Lyons

    I liked the stories, but I would have loved even more stories of normal, everyday women. Still, it's fun to learn about the history of some of the women who have paved ways for many of us in running.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I feel like the stories are good ( I really loved some!), but the writing is so mediocre that I even felt like it usually didn't do the stories justice--guess I'm just not into the newspaper type of writing though.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angela McVay

    I really enjoyed this book and could relate to the stories of why women run and what motivates them. Many stories were of elite professional female runners, and I enjoyed their competitiveness. Very motivating and inspiring book that also shared stories of female running groups.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.