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The Jungle Books (Active TOC, Free Audiobook) (A to Z Classics)

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With A to Z Classics, discover or rediscover all the classics of literature. Contains Active Table of Contents (HTML) and in the end of book include a bonus link to the free audiobook. The story of the man-cub Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle, guided by his mentors Baloo the bear, Bagheera the black panther and the ancient python Kaa, and who confronts his With A to Z Classics, discover or rediscover all the classics of literature. Contains Active Table of Contents (HTML) and ​in the end of book include a bonus link to the free audiobook. The story of the man-cub Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle, guided by his mentors Baloo the bear, Bagheera the black panther and the ancient python Kaa, and who confronts his arch-enemy Shere Khan the tiger, is one of the greatest literary myths ever created. Mowgli's adventures are juxtaposed with other animal stories set in the British Empire, ranging from the heroic battle of 'Rikki-tikki-tavi' and the Himalayan pastoral 'Purun Bhagat' to the drama of survival in 'The White Seal'. With The Jungle Books Rudyard Kipling drew on ancient beast fables, Buddhist philosophy and memories of his Anglo-Indian upbringing to create a rich, symbolic portrait of man and nature, and an eternal classic of childhood that has had a lasting impact on our imaginations.


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With A to Z Classics, discover or rediscover all the classics of literature. Contains Active Table of Contents (HTML) and in the end of book include a bonus link to the free audiobook. The story of the man-cub Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle, guided by his mentors Baloo the bear, Bagheera the black panther and the ancient python Kaa, and who confronts his With A to Z Classics, discover or rediscover all the classics of literature. Contains Active Table of Contents (HTML) and ​in the end of book include a bonus link to the free audiobook. The story of the man-cub Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle, guided by his mentors Baloo the bear, Bagheera the black panther and the ancient python Kaa, and who confronts his arch-enemy Shere Khan the tiger, is one of the greatest literary myths ever created. Mowgli's adventures are juxtaposed with other animal stories set in the British Empire, ranging from the heroic battle of 'Rikki-tikki-tavi' and the Himalayan pastoral 'Purun Bhagat' to the drama of survival in 'The White Seal'. With The Jungle Books Rudyard Kipling drew on ancient beast fables, Buddhist philosophy and memories of his Anglo-Indian upbringing to create a rich, symbolic portrait of man and nature, and an eternal classic of childhood that has had a lasting impact on our imaginations.

30 review for The Jungle Books (Active TOC, Free Audiobook) (A to Z Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    F

    My new favourite. Incredible. 10/10 Timeless. So much thought and imagination. Animal lover forever. Everything made sense, the laws of the jungle. Can't rememeber the last time i read something so amazing and unique. I dont cry reading books but this nearly got me at the end.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    eBook Once again, I'm struck by the savagery that resonates throughout Kipling's writing. It would be so easy to think of The Jungle Book in a more Disney-fied light: talking animals, singing, the rhythmic cadences of a fairy tale or lullaby. But overarching all that is the ever-present reminder that the world of the jungle is a world of nature, red in tooth and claw. Mowgli is raised by wolves and instructed by Baloo for the explicit purpose of survival in a harsh world that actively seeks his d eBook Once again, I'm struck by the savagery that resonates throughout Kipling's writing. It would be so easy to think of The Jungle Book in a more Disney-fied light: talking animals, singing, the rhythmic cadences of a fairy tale or lullaby. But overarching all that is the ever-present reminder that the world of the jungle is a world of nature, red in tooth and claw. Mowgli is raised by wolves and instructed by Baloo for the explicit purpose of survival in a harsh world that actively seeks his death. Kotick is born and raised amidst bloodshed from two distinct sources: other seals and man. "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" subverts the traditional story of a pet protecting his master by making the masters little more than incidental characters; Rikki-Tikki wants to protect them, but his actions are driven by instinct rather than any familial bond with the humans. Even in the less-obviously blood-drenched stories, violence is a powerful force. Toomai's journey to witness the dance of the elephants puts him at great risk of death. The story I found most interesting, however, was the one which closes the book, "Her Majesty's Servants." The characters of this particular story are the camp animals for an army, but paradoxically, these might be the most innocent characters in the whole book. All their conversation is about war and its methods, but without any real recognition of what it means. These animals have been tamed by man, stripped of their natural instincts, and so, with the exception of the elephant, they don't realize what war means, content merely to follow orders and limit their perspective to the specifics of their duties. And maybe that's the true lesson of The Jungle Book. Yes, it's violent, endlessly circling and returning to the themes of death and danger, but in the world of the animals, death and danger exists because they are necessary parts of life. Animals must eat, so animals must hunt and kill. But for people, violence is stripped of that which makes it necessary. Wars don't happen for food and survival; they happen for sport and profit. Or maybe I'm just a filthy hippie.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    This was a Jepheny/Mah Fah buddy read that we went into with great excitement and enthusiasm – “Can’t Wait!” “So looking forward to this!!” “I’ve had this on my shelves forever, let’s get started!!!” Woo Hoo!!!!! Alas, it was on the disappointing side. The hope was to get the original take on these stories that Disney has whitewashed on a couple of occasions and to that point it does succeed. Sort of. Kipling presents the adventures of a feral jungle boy and his bloodthirsty pals as they brutally This was a Jepheny/Mah Fah buddy read that we went into with great excitement and enthusiasm – “Can’t Wait!” “So looking forward to this!!” “I’ve had this on my shelves forever, let’s get started!!!” Woo Hoo!!!!! Alas, it was on the disappointing side. The hope was to get the original take on these stories that Disney has whitewashed on a couple of occasions and to that point it does succeed. Sort of. Kipling presents the adventures of a feral jungle boy and his bloodthirsty pals as they brutally live by the law of the jungle. No singing. No dancing. No resulting cute plushy version of Shere Khan to wander around Disneyland only to get kicked in the faux tiger family jewels by a vengeful four year old, summarily filmed and get a gazillion hits on YouTube and every dude who watches gets to wince at the “thank God that wasn’t me” implications. Youch, shots to the groin just aren’t funny! But I digress. This volume is The Jungle Books – plural, not The Jungle Book – singular. My favorite Mah Fah buddy reader of all time and Thunder Buddy for Life, Stepheny, was lucky to pick up The Jungle Book (singular) whilst I got stuck reading The Jungle Books (Two. Count ‘em. Two!)(plural). It’s also the smarty pants Penguin version, which includes a scholarly introduction by some elbow-patched, flannel jacketed, pipe smoking ass who gets to discourse with pseudo-intellectual insight what Kipling’s underlying message was for these stories. Plus, there are eight footnotes per page that direct you to the back of the book for even more “useless” background on this tome. The reader can repeatedly swing back and forth between text and appendix all the while humming “Bare Necessities” to him or herself. Also, kids, caveat emptor. All the stories aren’t about Mowgli and his savage, vicious pals. Rikki-Tikki-Tavi is the best of a wan bunch of animal-themed stories. Kipling even throws in a Seal and an Inuit story to keep the reader off balance and question the rather poor choice of titles. Arctic -> Freeze-your-nuts-off cold Jungle -> Sweat-your-nuts-off hot Just sayin’. The Mowgli stories are the best things here but they’re spread out through the two jungle books *waves to his favorite Mah Fah buddy reader Stepheny, who owes him big time*: Baby Man Cub is rescued and raised by wolves. Man Cub gets befriended by big bear and panther (Bagheera, the best character, by far, in this book). Man Cub wreaks revenge on evil human village. Man Cub grows up to dominate and lead his jungle pals (he has stare-down contests with ‘em). Man Cub grows up, gets restless and clumsy (read: horny). Does he leave the jungle to boogie elsewhere? Maybe. Snakes are Our Anthropomorphic Friends Department: As Stepheny and I will espouse with great conviction, snakes can be real pals (Hi Ermot!). So why does Kaa the Python get such a bum rap in the cartoon and “live action” remake? Sure he does his hypnotize thing but that’s only to eat some annoying, poo-flinging monkeys. He and Mowgli are good pals and he helps the Man Cub on a number of occasions. Man-eating pythons are man’s best friend. Yes? If I haven’t mentioned it before, this isn’t a kid-friendly version of these stories. So if you plan to sit down with your young ‘un and read stories based on seeing the cartoon, just don’t. (view spoiler)[ Mowgli skinning the bloody hide from a barely dead Shere Khan will keep the kiddies in nightmares for years to come. (hide spoiler)]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Yeah, yeah, ignore the White Man's Burden stuff. Kipling is one of the best storytellers who ever lived, and neither the author's obnoxious politics nor a complete butchery of this wonderful wonderful story in its many terrible movie incarnations can take away the fact that the Mowgli stories of this and the Second Jungle Book are some of the greatest tales ever created. Read this, for real. It's a classic.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pooja

    My Mom bought me The Jungle Book from her school and for years I didn't read it. Not until the summers of 2015 came and I promised myself that I'm going to complete that years' Goodreads' challenge. After reading the book, I remembered the days I used to watch the animated version on TV. Everything was perfect. Thank you Rudyard Kipling.

  6. 4 out of 5

    James

    Whilst I think it is important to note and be aware of Rudyard Kipling’s acknowledged support for imperialism and colonialism when reading any of his works – these aren’t themes which I found to be particularly evident let alone prevalent throughout this book. Whilst we may find his politics distasteful at best and abhorrent at worst, I do think it is valid to judge a book (or any other work of art) outside of and standing alone from the artists political / moral beliefs – more specifically and Whilst I think it is important to note and be aware of Rudyard Kipling’s acknowledged support for imperialism and colonialism when reading any of his works – these aren’t themes which I found to be particularly evident let alone prevalent throughout this book. Whilst we may find his politics distasteful at best and abhorrent at worst, I do think it is valid to judge a book (or any other work of art) outside of and standing alone from the artists political / moral beliefs – more specifically and perhaps only when those views do not (as in this case) overwhelm or define the art which is produced. On to the book: Difficult at first when reading the first Mowgli stories for those of us who know and love the 1967 animated Disney version – not to picture the animated characters in the context of the original stories. However, it transpires that the original book / stories have little or nothing to do with the animated Disney film – other than character names and the (sporadic) jungle setting. Once I was able to transcend that brief initial barrier to the imagination, I was then able to immerse myself fully in these stories to their full extent. As far as rating the book goes, this was challenging as the stories varied from anything between 2 and 5 stars – hence my eventual 4 star rating. To give some idea, I have listed the stories that I thought the most successful and enjoyed the most, as well as some that I found somewhat tedious and ultimately pointless. Favourites (not in any order): The White Seal Rikki-Tikki-Tavi Toomai of the Elephants The Miracle of Purun Bhagat How Fear Came The King's Ankus Quiquern The Spring Running Kaa's Hunting Tiger! Tiger! Most definitely bottom of the list: Her Majesty's Servants The Undertakers (I didn’t enjoy much of the poetry in between all the stories – with the odd notable exception). Overall and bearing in mind the number of great stories vs the number of ones that I think really should have been left out, this is a (generally) great collection of stories which creates a fantastic anthropomorphised world not just ‘of the jungle’ but of many other scenarios outside of/significantly remote from the jungle as well (which came as a surprise). This is written with such skill and creativity in some cases creating and resulting in some almost perfect short stories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kristy K

    2.5 Stars I liked some stories more than others. The first few were my favorite and then I got bored. Half read, half listened to on audio b/c it seemed every time I picked it up, I fell asleep.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adina

    Probably the first books that I read in English. Can't wait for the upcoming movie.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jerri Brissette

    Thoroughly enjoyable. Thank you, Karen, for this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I read this to Nick because I read it myself as a first grader. (Yes, I was a precocious reader.) Since I haven't even glanced at it in the quarter century of intervening years, it was interesting to come back to it. In some ways I was disappointed as an adult reader. The formal, quasi-Elizabethan language the animals use to talk to each other struck me as pretentious, which I don't believe was at all my original reaction. There was that almost total lack of female characters that is almost inev I read this to Nick because I read it myself as a first grader. (Yes, I was a precocious reader.) Since I haven't even glanced at it in the quarter century of intervening years, it was interesting to come back to it. In some ways I was disappointed as an adult reader. The formal, quasi-Elizabethan language the animals use to talk to each other struck me as pretentious, which I don't believe was at all my original reaction. There was that almost total lack of female characters that is almost inevitable in books meant for boys, which ticks me off every time. Kipling's imperialism and unconscious racism were also sadly clear to me. By racism, I hasten to add, I do not mean hatred. I mean an unthinking assumption that white people, specifically the English, are inherently better than brown people, specifically Indians, in certain ways. (The imperialism clearly arises from the same source.) In fact I think Kipling loved India, including the people who lived there. He just thought they weren't quite his equal. These things bothered me, but at the same time I don't want to be too hard on him. The man was writing over a hundred years ago, after all. He was a product of his time, and really, I think his attitudes were better than most of his contemporaries. In spite of all this, there were many things to admire about these stories. They are undeniably exciting, with a fully realized, exotic setting. Riki-Tiki-Tavi was just as good as I remembered it. The Mowgli stories were more melancholy and violent than I remembered, but that's not entirely a bad thing. It didn't bother Nick any, certainly, and it meant I enjoyed them more than I might have otherwise. Nick's opinion may matter the most. And he loved it. Maybe not as much as Harry Potter, but he was totally into the book. The parts that bothered me didn't impinge on his mind at all. All he heard was a series of cool stories about tough little boys and brave, noble animals.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    Jungle Books… I was really iffy coming in whether I’d like this; never read Kipling before. At my favorite bookstore, I saw that they had one of the Reader’s Digest books that I love so much, but my dad said he had an old copy of this book, so I went ahead and went with the old copy (chiefly because it was free to me). Contrary to what I thought, it was more a collection of short stories than one contiguous tale, though Mowgli featured in several of them, and it chronically various episodes in h Jungle Books… I was really iffy coming in whether I’d like this; never read Kipling before. At my favorite bookstore, I saw that they had one of the Reader’s Digest books that I love so much, but my dad said he had an old copy of this book, so I went ahead and went with the old copy (chiefly because it was free to me). Contrary to what I thought, it was more a collection of short stories than one contiguous tale, though Mowgli featured in several of them, and it chronically various episodes in his young life. But Sher Khan, his great antagonist, is really only in two of the stories, and is (spoiler warning) killed off pretty quickly in the book. I was kind of left wondering, “That’s it? That’s the end of Sher Khan?” It’d be like reading a Batman v. Joker novel, and Joker dies (permanently) in the second chapter. It’s kinda like… huh? Anyway, the writing itself… I’m somewhat torn. It’s a lot like Phantom of the Opera to me. Much of it is kinda boring, don’t really like it too much, but there’s parts that I enjoyed. For the most part, I liked the book early on, the middle was pretty boring, and the end was so-so. If I was to rate each part, the first third, I’d give 4 stars, the middle third, two stars maybe, the third half, three stars. So I guess you can see where this is going. Three stars. Seems fair. Of the non-Mowgli stories, the only one I liked was Rikki-Tikki-whatever (spelling), the story of a mongoose who does battle with a nest of snakes. He’s a hero! Haha, I liked that little ferret. Good to keep around the house if you have a snake problem. Anyway, yep, three stars overall for the book. I do kinda wanna see the new film. It was purely coincidental that I chose to read Jungle Book this month when the film was coming out; I didn’t know about the film.

  12. 4 out of 5

    N.KH #

    I’ve already completed reading the first book( or let me say the first part) , and I am not quite sure whether I continue reading or not . even though several and various moral lessons are embodied within the animals tales , I have not found any interest nor excitement so far . Consequently, I doubt whether I read all of it , and begin to think about another book . The tale of the Seal sea that defies all the odious challenges and the atrocious underestimating of his kind to discover a safe plac I’ve already completed reading the first book( or let me say the first part) , and I am not quite sure whether I continue reading or not . even though several and various moral lessons are embodied within the animals tales , I have not found any interest nor excitement so far . Consequently, I doubt whether I read all of it , and begin to think about another book . The tale of the Seal sea that defies all the odious challenges and the atrocious underestimating of his kind to discover a safe place for them has lots to say about human ‘s determination . That no matter how hard a thing is , people will find a way to seek it as long as means too much for them . The snake killer’s , mongoose, story tells readers about the beauty and value of loyalty because that creature puts himself in harms way to rescue a family from snakes ignoring the fact that he is not an expert . However , I find myself being bored and looking at the watch all the time , for the minutes do not sound to move at all . despite the fact that the stories are pretty short , I found them unbelievably tedious and monotonous . SIGHS! Nevertheless, I have this book on my coffee table , so perhaps I may read the rest of it one day .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ensiform

    A series of stories, mostly but not always set in India. I did not know when I first picked this up that not all of these tales feature the most famous character: Mowgli, the baby carried off by a lame tiger and rescued by wolves, who grows to be master of the jungle. (In this, he predates Tarzan by a couple of decades.) I remember reading some, but not all, of this book many years ago, but I remembered little of it, especially from the second book. Some of the tales are well-known ("Rikki-Tikki- A series of stories, mostly but not always set in India. I did not know when I first picked this up that not all of these tales feature the most famous character: Mowgli, the baby carried off by a lame tiger and rescued by wolves, who grows to be master of the jungle. (In this, he predates Tarzan by a couple of decades.) I remember reading some, but not all, of this book many years ago, but I remembered little of it, especially from the second book. Some of the tales are well-known ("Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”) and some not so well known ("Servants Of the Queen," in which various army pack animals discuss their lot, and by extension, the lot of their masters, in life). For me, the ones that jarred the most were the stories that take place in the Arctic regions of all places ("The White Seal" and "Quiquern"). They seemed wildly incongruous mixed in between the better-known tales of the tropics. The one connecting thread of the tales, no matter what their locale, is that they all deal in some way with an animal's view of the world. Are these tales allegories of colonialism? I don’t know. I can see how one might argue the fact --- "The White Seal" in particular appears to be a particularly blatant suggestion of the superiority of the white man --- but it's also clear that Kipling loved India, far too much to write about it simply to push an agenda. Even if it is an extended allegory (which I don't believe) it’s a very poor one, since it's so rich and subtle. Anyone could pick it up and enjoy a tale of adventure, fantasy, heroism, familial love, triumph over tragedy, and sad farewells without ever dreaming there might be some hidden meaning, or considering what the various animals "represent." It's often considered a children's book, but I doubt it would be thought so if it appeared today; the language is complex, there's quite a lot of killing and threats of torture, and, least Disneyfied of all, the end is not at all the neatly-tied happy resolution that the majority of non-series children's stories seem to require today. (Kipling seems to favor ambiguous, rather sad endings; Kimand Thy Servant a Dog are respective examples). Still, what kid wouldn't want to hear about how Mowgli massacred the pack of wild dogs with the help of a python, some wolves, and about a million angry bees?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lesle

    The Jungle Books: I should have realized when it states "Books" there are other tales other than just the Jungle Book. I guess I was just a little dense from reading the Little Golden Book version for so long to my Son and Grandsons. So once I got passed the point of 340 pages not dedicated strictly to Mowgli I began to read and enjoy the many tales enclosed. Everyone (Im sure) knows the story of Mowgli and have seen the versions of films. It was the first film my Son saw as a toddler and the mov The Jungle Books: I should have realized when it states "Books" there are other tales other than just the Jungle Book. I guess I was just a little dense from reading the Little Golden Book version for so long to my Son and Grandsons. So once I got passed the point of 340 pages not dedicated strictly to Mowgli I began to read and enjoy the many tales enclosed. Everyone (Im sure) knows the story of Mowgli and have seen the versions of films. It was the first film my Son saw as a toddler and the movie my Grandsons fell asleep to each and every night, they loved it that much. This second book of Kiplings can be enjoyed by adults, the story has more depth than the version I have always read. There are also moral lessons of loyalty included with a little of man law justice. I think older readers will get much more out of these tales than younger readers that are used to the Disney version of Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the jungles of India. Once grown he has many guides who teach him the ways, these include his friends Baloo the bear, Bagheera the panther and Kaa the python, as they face the jungle enemy Shere Khan the tiger. The other tales? “The White Seal”, which is the story of a rare white furred northern seal looking for a new home where he will not be hunted by humans. “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi”a stand-a-lone tale of a mongoose who defends a family living against a pair of cobras. “Toomai of the Elephants” is about boy of 10 that helps to take care of the elephants that are used to work and how someday they dance. And finally “Her Majesty’s Servants” about a camp full of men and their animals that talk amongst themselves about their work and being afraid. It is not the simple tale I was imagining in the beginning, nevertheless Kipling is an incredible writer. Kipling was the recipient of the 1907 Nobel Prize in Literature.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Berit Lundqvist

    Three and a half stars. Well, this was kind of a pleasant surprise. I expected absolutely nothing from this book. Instead I found a couple of stories exploring the eternal question of what is good and what is evil. The Jungle Books have been on my shelf for decades. I haven’t the foggiest idea where I got it from. Probably, I’ve inherited it from my mom or my parents-in-law, as this is not a book I’ve would have wanted to buy myself. The books consists of fifteen different tales. Some take part in Three and a half stars. Well, this was kind of a pleasant surprise. I expected absolutely nothing from this book. Instead I found a couple of stories exploring the eternal question of what is good and what is evil. The Jungle Books have been on my shelf for decades. I haven’t the foggiest idea where I got it from. Probably, I’ve inherited it from my mom or my parents-in-law, as this is not a book I’ve would have wanted to buy myself. The books consists of fifteen different tales. Some take part in the jungle, others elsewhere. We get to meet the white seal (who leads his fellow seals to safety), the clever mungo (who saves humans and other animals from evil snakes in a garden), an Indian nobleman (who leaves his earthly possessions in order to become a monk), a very old crocodile (who watches over his village and is revered like a god), and many other creatures. However, the most known character of the books is Mowgli, and quite a few stories are dedicated to him. As an infant he is taken by the evil tiger Shere Khan, but is saved by a pack of wolves. When the tiger claims his prey he is bought free by the panther Bagheera. Mowgli is raised by the wolf pack, and educated in the laws and the languages of the jungle by Baloo, the bear, and Bagheera. Kipling lets the reader follow a number of his adventures: How he kills his arch enemy Shere Khan, how he destroys a villages to revenge his foster parents, how he fights a pack of wild dogs etc. As time goes by, Mowgli becomes the leader of the jungle, and that changes him. He gets more and more frustrated and melancholic. Slowly he makes up his mind that the jungle may not be his real home after all. Lesson learned: Disney was wrong. Kaa, the snake, is a reasonably good guy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    El

    Before Tarzan there was Mowgli, lost in a jungle in India as a child and taken in by a family of wolves. He is raised by the animals of the jungle, and has adventures with them. He learns loyalty and devotion and the Jungle Law. Every small boy eventually grows up but, to pararphrase Kipling, his adult adventures are a different story. Written in 1894 and 1895 the two collections of adventure/jungle/wilderness stories are included in one volume. Mowgli and his stories are the vast majority, but Before Tarzan there was Mowgli, lost in a jungle in India as a child and taken in by a family of wolves. He is raised by the animals of the jungle, and has adventures with them. He learns loyalty and devotion and the Jungle Law. Every small boy eventually grows up but, to pararphrase Kipling, his adult adventures are a different story. Written in 1894 and 1895 the two collections of adventure/jungle/wilderness stories are included in one volume. Mowgli and his stories are the vast majority, but there are other scenes and other stories included, such as "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", about a small boy and his mongoose. As usual Disney took Mowgli's stories from The Jungle Books and turned it into this cream-puff of a movie. Kipling's versions are a little darker as one might imagine, and have deeper undertones about the environment that are at best glazed over in the Disney cartoon. Not the best stuff I've read recently, but it's good to finally be able ot mark it off my list. I would have liked to have heard less about Mowgli (which is Disney's fault for the overkill factor) and more about the Artic region as in Kipling's story, "Quiquern".

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The first time I met Mowgli was when I was very small. I must have been only around two years old and I had watched the Disney film. I HATED it. But when I realized that it was based off of a book (when I was around five or six) I immediately went to the library and checked out both Jungle Books. It was then that I fell in love. Kipling is very problematic racially and politically. Throughout these books it is easy to pick up on Kipling's inherent prejudice. Through Mowgli the reader is introduce The first time I met Mowgli was when I was very small. I must have been only around two years old and I had watched the Disney film. I HATED it. But when I realized that it was based off of a book (when I was around five or six) I immediately went to the library and checked out both Jungle Books. It was then that I fell in love. Kipling is very problematic racially and politically. Throughout these books it is easy to pick up on Kipling's inherent prejudice. Through Mowgli the reader is introduced to a "superstitious" and often "savage" race of people. In spite of Kipling's racism this is still one of my favorite book series. Mowgli, his friends, and his adventures still make me smile, cringe, and cry (especially at certain character deaths). The Jungle Books is something that can be enjoyed by anyone whether they are adults or children. I'd recommend these books to anyone who loves an adventure and characters who, while flawed and occasionally severe, get right up inside you and live there for years to come.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    I read this as a "I need to be culturally literate" read. I enjoyed about 2/3rds of this. And to be honest, had to force myself through the other 1/3. Glad I read it but glad it is done.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason McIntosh

    really a beautiful collection of stories. Though the book somehow leaves out the inclusion of Baloo singing "the Bear Necessities" ... a gross oversight in my opinion.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    When I was little, I was read this book by my mother. It was a red book with gold lettering, and it still sits on my bookshelf. Still intact, still with its bright red color and its shining gold lettering. Yet I can't remember the book itself... I remember the feel of the cover; the almost rough surface felt pleasant between my two hands... Yet still, I can't remember reading it. I hope to read it again someday, but for now I will just imagine the golden lettering and the bright gold letters. Th When I was little, I was read this book by my mother. It was a red book with gold lettering, and it still sits on my bookshelf. Still intact, still with its bright red color and its shining gold lettering. Yet I can't remember the book itself... I remember the feel of the cover; the almost rough surface felt pleasant between my two hands... Yet still, I can't remember reading it. I hope to read it again someday, but for now I will just imagine the golden lettering and the bright gold letters. Then one day, I will pick it up, blow off the dust, and hear the ancient spine crack like it had never been opened....... And I will enter the jungle once more............ Finally, later, I made my way through the jungle. Rudyard Kipling’s The First Jungle Book and its sequel, The Second Jungle Book comprise this great novel about the life of Mowgli the Man-cub and his friends: Bagheera the Black Panther, Baloo the bear and teacher of the Law of the Jungle, Shere Khan the lame tiger, Hathi the silent elephant and his three sons, and many others. Many people remember The Jungle Book from the Disney movie, full of music and happiness, and the life of Mowgli… The book is much different. Baloo does not dance like he does in the movie, but is rather slow, and cannot even keep up with Bagheera and Kaa the rock python when they go to save Mowgli from the Bandar-log: the monkey people. They, by the way, do not have an orangutan leader who sings to Mowgli about wanting to be like him, but are instead little mischief-makers who have no law, and have no sense to do anything productive at all. Kipling says, “They were always just going to have a leader, and laws and customs of their won, but they never did, because their memories would not hold over from day to day…” But Mowgli’s kidnapping is just one of several adventures he encounters, such as his short period of time living with man. Reading this book again nine years after I first read it, I was surprised on how much I didn’t remember and how much was so different from the movie. Looking back, I sort of expected it to be like the movie, I guess. I was very wrong in this assumption, however. This was a hard read, and even today I couldn’t comprehend some pieces of it. I am surprised I was so tuned into it as a four-year-old child. I guess it was the beautiful poetic writing and the wonderful time I had reading it with my family that made me so entranced. It was wonderful. I wish I could go back and relive that whole time again…

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This review covers both the first and second Jungle Books, which are included in this edition. These included a lot of material which surprised me. I was not aware how much Disney altered the original material. Mowgli is so much more than a whiny git. Kipling's Mowgli is very much a proto-Conan. Kipling is more of a master of the action scene than Robert E. Howard, and the influence seems clear to me. Another clear influence is the discussion of civilization versus barbarism within the Jungle Bo This review covers both the first and second Jungle Books, which are included in this edition. These included a lot of material which surprised me. I was not aware how much Disney altered the original material. Mowgli is so much more than a whiny git. Kipling's Mowgli is very much a proto-Conan. Kipling is more of a master of the action scene than Robert E. Howard, and the influence seems clear to me. Another clear influence is the discussion of civilization versus barbarism within the Jungle Book stories. Kipling presented a subtle view making it clear that neither is a clear winner. This debate of civilization versus barbarism is one that Lovecraft and Howard continued in their correspondence and stories. I really loved most of the Mowgli stories, particularly considering they were way more violent than I expected. Kaa's Hunting presents the original kidnapping of Mowgli by the monkeys, and his rescue is tense and bloody. It also includes an amusing lesson in the importance of learning one's school lessons. The King's Ankus has a very interesting take on the "barbaric" view on treasure, and also the value of leaving entombed treasure lie. My favorite of the non-Mowgli stories included Rikki Tikki Tavi as well as The Undertakers. Rikki Tikki Tavi is a favorite from my childhood, and I was unaware that it was a Jungle Book story until my recent excursion. This one holds up amazingly well, as the action is well paced and the tension is gripping. In addition, Rikki is not a British colonialist in a mongoose suit. Rikki is Mongoose. The people are almost peripheral to the story, and are almost, but not quite, a macguffin in order to provide Rikki with opportunities to kick some serious snake ass. The Undertakers has some seriously dark and subtle humor. The eponymous characters are all self-important carrion eaters. Their braggadocio storytelling ends in delightfully macabre justice.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Breakaway Reviewers

    An absolute classic! Like most people, I have seen the Disney classic film, Jungle Book, and it is actually one of my favourite Disney films. I always thought that I had read this book as a child and the first story is basically the story that we all know and love with Mowgli, Baloo, Bagheera, Shere Khan and Kaa the snake. However, there are so many different stories in this book, some I had heard of like Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, the mongoose who can kill even the biggest snake, but we are introduced to An absolute classic! Like most people, I have seen the Disney classic film, Jungle Book, and it is actually one of my favourite Disney films. I always thought that I had read this book as a child and the first story is basically the story that we all know and love with Mowgli, Baloo, Bagheera, Shere Khan and Kaa the snake. However, there are so many different stories in this book, some I had heard of like Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, the mongoose who can kill even the biggest snake, but we are introduced to so many different characters that I realised I had never read the whole book. I am so pleased that I now have had the opportunity to do this because there are so many good stories regarding various jungle creatures. However, even better for me were the stories of creatures not living in the jungle. There is one about seals that I particularly enjoyed but probably my favourite is the one describing the life of Eskimos living in the very frozen North. I almost felt the cold whilst I was reading this story of incredible hardship in finding food just in order to live. Kipling was such a brilliant storyteller and I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It really should be in the school curriculum and if it is not the parents should read this with their children as it is a delight. Dexter Breakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dee Renee Chesnut

    This ebook has been in my Nook library since I downloaded it for free from Barnes in Noble, about October 2010. It is part of the Barnes and Noble Classics. Kipling originally published two Jungle Books in 1894 and 1895. I enjoyed reading the extra materials too. These stories are not the Disney version. The stories remain entertaining and thought-provoking. I encourage all readers to enjoy this classic.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gina Johnson

    Read this to the kids and we all really enjoyed it. I think I liked the stories that weren't actually jungle stories (one about a white seal and a few others) more than the kids did but they all really enjoyed the stories about Mowgli. AO year 3 scheduled read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    A classic children's story that everyone should read at some point in their lives.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ninja

    Something like 7 and 8 stories in the two Jungle Books. Most surprising thing reading the first jungle book was that most of the stories didn't have Mowgli in them. Overall, though, he just won out with a total of 8 stories in the 15 total featuring him. The second Jungle Book might have been a little stronger than the first. The non-mowgli stories were a little varied in quality, and like a number of other such collections a bit of a reading break between the stories here and there helps. But o Something like 7 and 8 stories in the two Jungle Books. Most surprising thing reading the first jungle book was that most of the stories didn't have Mowgli in them. Overall, though, he just won out with a total of 8 stories in the 15 total featuring him. The second Jungle Book might have been a little stronger than the first. The non-mowgli stories were a little varied in quality, and like a number of other such collections a bit of a reading break between the stories here and there helps. But overall there's a wonderful liveliness to all the creatures.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Iris (BlueIris)

    I know I shouldn't compare the book to the Disney movie, but still I expected more from it. Half of the stories aren't even about Mowgli, but were some old Indian sagas or something that didn't really interest me. The Mowgli stories were fun reads, but the other stories I didn't really like. So therefore only two stars...

  28. 5 out of 5

    crashqueen73

    I did this as a read aloud with my class and I have to say it was hard going a lot of the time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris Eirschele

    The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling, this one produced by Race Point Publishing in 2016. Illustrations by Maurice & Edward Detmold. The collection of his stories were originally published in magazines in the late 1800s. I highly recommend this book for children and adults. I reread it for Kipling's writing style, but still enjoyed his story telling.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Karpuk

    In a really roundabout way, Kipling is responsible for you crying at Bambi (I didn't cry, I was just confused. The subtlety of the gunshot of camera didn't register. I spent the rest of the movie thinking Bambi's dad had gained sole custody. I was kind of stupid kid sometimes.) The Jungle Book is one of the early popular cases where an author so thoroughly anthropomorphosized animals. It's really a smug assumption that fits well with the British imperial mindset of the book. In a position of safe In a really roundabout way, Kipling is responsible for you crying at Bambi (I didn't cry, I was just confused. The subtlety of the gunshot of camera didn't register. I spent the rest of the movie thinking Bambi's dad had gained sole custody. I was kind of stupid kid sometimes.) The Jungle Book is one of the early popular cases where an author so thoroughly anthropomorphosized animals. It's really a smug assumption that fits well with the British imperial mindset of the book. In a position of safety and power it's easy to act like animals are just people that speak a language we're unable to translate. Animals are animals. If they think they can take you, they'll kill you, sometimes for safety, sometimes for food. Otherwise they will run. We domesticate animals because humans find such behavior annoying. Trying to empathize with things that can not actually communicate gets people killed and eaten every year. For all his research, there's an odd sort of cluelessness to Rudyard Kipling's writing. The tales are chocked full of fun facts about animals and their habitats, but he doesn't seem to be aware that he was partially able to experience sites like India because he was a member of a massive Victorian empire. He's too busy imagining what animals would sound like in different casts and royal orders. Yes, these animals often talk like they work at a ren fest. Along with his dorky poems it's a fun reminder that as long as there's been writing, there's probably been nerds. Fortunately his poetic tendencies inform the prose, which flows smoothly, making the bulk of the stories a pleasant read. It's easy to visualize most scenes, and the writing paints a clear picture. Mr. Kipling had more of an impact on my childhood than I realized. Ricky Ticky Tavi and The White Seal were both adapted by Chuck Jones, and I watched those two cartoons obsessively as a child. Reading the source of those stories was slightly surreal, details lining up with images baked into my brain years ago. The secret seal island only accessible from beneath still sounds pretty awesome. Structurally the layout is rather wonky. It starts with the Mowgli stories, which are told out of sequential order, and then drifts off into a few short subjects. Kipling's style, while amusing, just doesn't emotionally engage. The one major advantage of the Disney adaptation of the Jungle Book was the addition of humor. The source material is fairly reserved, no nonsense stuff. I read the first book on my iPhone Stanza reader using a public domain copy. At this point , unless you're hellbent on having a paperback copy, you don't need to pay for almost any text more than a 100 years old. I listed the Amazon Kindle edition because it's the only one similar. I don't actually feel compelled to read the Second Jungle Book anytime soon, I've had my fill of his outlook on the wild.

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