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The Magic of Thinking Big: (Vermilion Life Essentials)

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The Magic of Thinking Big gives you useful methods, not empty promises. Dr. Schwartz presents a carefully designed program for getting the most out of your job, your marriage and family life, and your community. He proves that you don't need to be an intellectual or have innate talent to attain great success and satisfaction, but you do need to learn and understand the habit The Magic of Thinking Big gives you useful methods, not empty promises. Dr. Schwartz presents a carefully designed program for getting the most out of your job, your marriage and family life, and your community. He proves that you don't need to be an intellectual or have innate talent to attain great success and satisfaction, but you do need to learn and understand the habit of thinking and behaving in ways that will get you there.


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The Magic of Thinking Big gives you useful methods, not empty promises. Dr. Schwartz presents a carefully designed program for getting the most out of your job, your marriage and family life, and your community. He proves that you don't need to be an intellectual or have innate talent to attain great success and satisfaction, but you do need to learn and understand the habit The Magic of Thinking Big gives you useful methods, not empty promises. Dr. Schwartz presents a carefully designed program for getting the most out of your job, your marriage and family life, and your community. He proves that you don't need to be an intellectual or have innate talent to attain great success and satisfaction, but you do need to learn and understand the habit of thinking and behaving in ways that will get you there.

30 review for The Magic of Thinking Big: (Vermilion Life Essentials)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    An inspiring book that will teach you to think beyond the mundane, every day, status quo. The enemy we call "average" threatens to take away the hopes, dreams, and meaning in our lives. Strive for excellence in everything you do. If you want something you've never had, you'll have to do something you've never done.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tracy S.

    I know several people who feel that this book has changed their lives. I'm not certain I can make that claim for myself, but this was the first time I'd heard of the three failure diseases: Procrastonation, Excuse-itis and detail-itis. I think at some time or another, I was guilty of all three. Now I tend to catch mysef in the midst of them and think "a-ha! Stop that."

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Rosage

    This book changed the way I look at the world, and will remain a powerful reminder of the great things that can be accomplished with the right attitude.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Fox

    A Review of The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Schwartz Think success, don’t think failure. The mantra of believe in yourself is the premise of this book. The copy I have read was first published in 1960. This was one of the books I found in my grandfather’s bookcase and one which I kept after he died. This is second time I have read this book with many years between the readings. I know the book has been re-published many times since and is available. The reason I selected this bo A Review of The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Schwartz Think success, don’t think failure. The mantra of believe in yourself is the premise of this book. The copy I have read was first published in 1960. This was one of the books I found in my grandfather’s bookcase and one which I kept after he died. This is second time I have read this book with many years between the readings. I know the book has been re-published many times since and is available. The reason I selected this book to write a review is that maybe a newer generation might find it an interesting book to read, and they might not have heard about it before. The book is really a tutorial of how to respond positively to events with mini stories describing how other people have handled both negative and positive events in their lives. This gives the reader a clear understanding of how to approach similar situations with good advice. Of course “you can’t move mountains” but believe in yourself and your abilities and you will climb a mountain of doubt. Because, if you do not believe in yourself you are more likely will not succeed. I have always believed that to succeed in anything you have to have confidence in yourself. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But, it’s true. The more confidence you have within you the more other people will believe in you. Don’t suffer from fear is another mantra the author discusses which is I believe is a common feeling we all have when it comes to our ability to try new things. We fear failure more, partly because of the unknown and what other people might think about us. I have written about this subject because I feel we are all capable of achieving what we want. Sometimes we just need to understand that fear is only temporary when we start to take action. When we confront our fear head-on the more likely we will gain confidence in ourselves to tackle similar situations in the future. What I would say which I feel the author doesn’t express is that as humans we have the tendency to set our expectations to high and when things don’t pan out the way we expected them to we can get disillusioned and often depressed. I am not saying you should not aim high or set your goals high, but sometimes things are not always in our control. So we have to learn to aim high, but always remember that not everything is going to go our way. My analogy of this would be the climbing of Mount Everest, sometimes events and conditions are against you, but for those who keep trying they often reach the summit of their goal. What we all must accept is that failure is part of success. Those that keep trying will find success, as long as they are prepared to evaluate their performance after each attempt and improve. It’s natural and part of our makeup that as individuals we don’t like coming second, but in a race sometimes there is only one winner. We have to learn that success is more subjective and teach ourselves that taking part is a success. This will make us more confident as individuals with the right attitude to be a better person in this world. This book is worth keeping and re-reading. David J. Schwartz says “Got a good idea? Then do something about it.”

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brady Bunte

    I have to admit, I have read this book about 8 times. I make it a goal to read this book every six months because of the powerful influences that come from Dr. Schwartz. I read this book initially in 1999 and was taken aback by how powerful the thinking process is. As a result of applying the book, I was able to get a better job, attain certifications in my field (Computers), buy a house and feel much better about myself. If you find yourself in need of a change, look no further than this book.< I have to admit, I have read this book about 8 times. I make it a goal to read this book every six months because of the powerful influences that come from Dr. Schwartz. I read this book initially in 1999 and was taken aback by how powerful the thinking process is. As a result of applying the book, I was able to get a better job, attain certifications in my field (Computers), buy a house and feel much better about myself. If you find yourself in need of a change, look no further than this book. I recommend this book for family and friends. While the book was written some 30+ years ago, the concepts are still relevant, and the stories hold true today. Put this book at the top of your must read list!!! Brady Bunte

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I came away from this self-help book with a few useful/helpful tidbits, namely in the "stay positive," "love what you do" and "work hard" categories. However, as helpful as the book was in the 1960s for millions of people, I don't think I represent its ideal audience. Because, in order to truly glean more than just a few tidbits of advice from this book, I imagine you would have to subscribe to the thinking that "success" and its cousin, "happiness," are defined the way Dr. Schwartz defines it: I came away from this self-help book with a few useful/helpful tidbits, namely in the "stay positive," "love what you do" and "work hard" categories. However, as helpful as the book was in the 1960s for millions of people, I don't think I represent its ideal audience. Because, in order to truly glean more than just a few tidbits of advice from this book, I imagine you would have to subscribe to the thinking that "success" and its cousin, "happiness," are defined the way Dr. Schwartz defines it: having lots (and lots) of respect, lots of control, and therefore gaining lots of money. (I don't). This narrow concept was further muddled for me by the fact that this book was written 50 years ago-- dragging along its dated jargon (What on earth does "blow my stack" mean??) and stereotypical gender roles. Although I appreciate Dr. Schwartz' desire to keep the "wives" happy as well, as they are apparently all at home doing dishes in every anecdote Schwartz uses... (I wonder what THEIR definiton of success is?)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amit Mishra

    It's a really nice book well crafted for the persons of any age. Sometimes you get stuck in your life and you reach a conclusion that there is no way out now. That's where motivation comes to play you consider some phenomenal work that can inspire you and burn a light of hope deep inside your heart. These books are not extraordnary, the ideas and opinion are the same what we use to talk everyday. But the way authore ahs persented us that is soemthing insirational and tremendous. It talks ab It's a really nice book well crafted for the persons of any age. Sometimes you get stuck in your life and you reach a conclusion that there is no way out now. That's where motivation comes to play you consider some phenomenal work that can inspire you and burn a light of hope deep inside your heart. These books are not extraordnary, the ideas and opinion are the same what we use to talk everyday. But the way authore ahs persented us that is soemthing insirational and tremendous. It talks about almost everything.

  8. 5 out of 5

    James

    I'm a Yorkshireman — from the north of England — we subsist on a steady diet of tea and disappointment. This book contains good advice but as a grumpy northerner I still found it annoying. You can buy the book here.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Al-Abdullah

    I got the recommendation for this book from Anthony Robins in his famous book (Awaken Your Giant Within) , and he quoted lots of sayings and mentioned them in his book .. Then I decided to read it as soon as I could .. Although, it's shorter than Robins's book but really it's an amazing book, full of essential concepts and secrets .. I recommend everybody to read it deeply and apply it's concepts

  10. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    On the one hand, this book had some good advice about things like thinking positive, treating people well and setting a good example. On the other hand, the author's misogynistic views on women is prevalent throughout the book and is really a sign of when this book was written (the 1950s). Women cannot be successful business people - they are allowed to work menial jobs or be wives, but nothing more. I'd like to think that since they are still publishing this book that they would update it every On the one hand, this book had some good advice about things like thinking positive, treating people well and setting a good example. On the other hand, the author's misogynistic views on women is prevalent throughout the book and is really a sign of when this book was written (the 1950s). Women cannot be successful business people - they are allowed to work menial jobs or be wives, but nothing more. I'd like to think that since they are still publishing this book that they would update it every now and then to make it more relevant to the times, but if they have, they haven't changed the way women are discussed at all. Also, I really didn't expect the book to have a surprise twist at the end. In the last chapter of the book, the author is making the point that it is important for people to spend time alone for critical thinking. It's not bad advice but he uses Hitler (surprise! Hitler gets brought up!) as an example of someone who used his time alone to come up with a "brilliantly wicked" plan. Then on the next page, the author says that people "discover that decisions and observations made alone in managed solitude have an uncanny way of being 100% right!" Wait, did he just imply Hitler was right???

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I don't really like self help books, but this was a really good book. Simple, quick read, and actually had intelligent content. I would recommend this book to anyone, but if you like self help books, then this is a must read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian Johnson

    “Think Big and you’ll live big. You’ll live big in happiness. You’ll live big in accomplishment. Big in income. Big in friends. Big in respect… Start now, right now, to discover how to make your thinking make magic for you. Start out with this thought of the great philosopher Disraeli: ‘Life is too short to be little.’” “In brief, it really is easy to forget the unpleasant if we simply refuse to recall it. Withdraw only positive thoughts from your memory bank. Let the others fade away. And your “Think Big and you’ll live big. You’ll live big in happiness. You’ll live big in accomplishment. Big in income. Big in friends. Big in respect… Start now, right now, to discover how to make your thinking make magic for you. Start out with this thought of the great philosopher Disraeli: ‘Life is too short to be little.’” “In brief, it really is easy to forget the unpleasant if we simply refuse to recall it. Withdraw only positive thoughts from your memory bank. Let the others fade away. And your confidence, that feeling of being on top of the world, will zoom upward. You take a big step forward toward conquering your fear when you refuse to remember negative, self deprecating thoughts.” ~ David J. Schwartz from The Magic of Thinking Big Ahhh… The MAGIC of thinking BIG. That’s a fun topic. Are you thinking big? You better if you plan to be big. This book deserves a spot on your top list. It’s written in some old school language (originally published in 1959) but still carries some big mojo that’s worth checking out, regardless of the field in which you want to get “big”—be it in business or your bank account or your relationships or even your spirituality. Schwartz’ wisdom echoes all the greats and if you’re committed to living your highest and biggest life, this is pretty darn close to a must read. Here are some of the Big Ideas: 1. Believe Big - If you want to think big. 2. Excusitis - Get your vaccination. 3. Stickability - Persistence-->Success. 4. Action Cures Fear - Always. 5. Memory Bank Deposits - Make good ones! I PROMISE you that if you get in the habit of asking and answering that question with positive action, we’ll all hear about you and your big dreams and big life. I’m looking forward to it. ----- Here's my video review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQj7i... And click here to find 250+ more of my reviews: http://bit.ly/BrianReviews Brian

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fox

    I read this book many years ago. It changed my life. So, I picked up a Kindle edition and took another tour through its pages. It's still a game changer. I'm surprised at two things: 1) how many principles taught in this book that I've forgotten over the years, and 2) how some of my fundamental characteristics, things that are deeply ingrained in me, were rooted in this book from my first reading all those years ago. This book is now going on my annual rotation list.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cate

    This is a good book only if you read it to yourself in the voice of a 1950s tv announcer. First published in 1959, this book is chock full of sound advice for the young gentleman looking to get ahead, acquire the secrets of success, make more money for his family, think like a leader, etc. etc. Where are the women? Why, they're at home, of course, cooking and cleaning and raising those children. Each chapter is an examination of a different successories-style motivational lecture: Believe You Ca This is a good book only if you read it to yourself in the voice of a 1950s tv announcer. First published in 1959, this book is chock full of sound advice for the young gentleman looking to get ahead, acquire the secrets of success, make more money for his family, think like a leader, etc. etc. Where are the women? Why, they're at home, of course, cooking and cleaning and raising those children. Each chapter is an examination of a different successories-style motivational lecture: Believe You Can Succeed and You Will, Cure Yourself of Excusitis - the Failure Disease, You Are What You Think You Are, and many more. This is a fantastic sort of anthropology study of America in the mid-20th century, with a little Dale Carnegie and Charles Atlas tossed in for good measure.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ashok Krishna

    Books on personal development, or the so-called ‘self’-help genre, have been around for so long, there is no doubt about that. There is a plethora of such books, which promise to help a person overcome the tough situations in life and sail through smoothly. Especially in our modern times, where publishing a book has become as easy as ordering a product online, there is a rise in the number of authors who promise to improve your life by offering some quick-fix solutions for your troubles. But the Books on personal development, or the so-called ‘self’-help genre, have been around for so long, there is no doubt about that. There is a plethora of such books, which promise to help a person overcome the tough situations in life and sail through smoothly. Especially in our modern times, where publishing a book has become as easy as ordering a product online, there is a rise in the number of authors who promise to improve your life by offering some quick-fix solutions for your troubles. But there are very few authors who write books that leave a lasting impact, without merely indulging in flowery language and empty platitudes. 'The Magic of Thinking Big' is a book of the first kind. Make no mistakes about it, all of us started our lives by dreaming big. We had high ambitions, we dreamt big and hoped big. But sooner than later the 'reality' gave us a wake-up call and the world around made us shrink our dreams and thoughts. Few of us, if ever, arrived at our last day with all our dreams fulfilled and all our hopes intact. Life shakes us all up and shatters our dreams. But some of us march on, tough as nails in the face of struggles. What separates such victors from the vanquished is their thought process. When Life throws you a challenge, one can simply wilt down and wither away or one can simply toughen oneself up and tear apart the challenges. And, one's self-belief plays the most crucial role in how one overcomes the challenges. In this book, Dr.David Schwartz elaborates on the ageless principle of 'you become what you think'. What is so refreshing about this book is the very practical approach to the problems and the offering of subtle solutions. This book does not ask you to write some self-assuring line for 100 times daily. This book does not ask you to stare at yourself in a mirror - except on one rare occasion - and repeat some 'magical phrase' so many times to encourage yourself. All this book asks you is to think and to think BIG. One of the most interesting aspects of this book is, this is quite comprehensive. Whether you are suffering from self-imposed inferiority complex or you have been told by people that you’re incapable of doing something, whether you’re suffering a setback in your venture or you’ve not even started yet due to fear, this book will add a dash of confidence to your thoughts and deeds. It all flows in simple, plain language, as if a friend is sitting across the table, speaking with you about your troubles and help stimulate your thought process, through which you get to correct your thought process and solve your troubles on your own. There is no peppering of quotes from ancient philosophers and certainly no repetition of platitudes as many popular modern-day authors wont to do. If you would want to read only one book of the personal development genre ever, choose this one. For, this is such a beautiful, brilliant and worthwhile stuff!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lars Andersson

    This one of the first books I read in my life and it is very good if you like to learn how to do a business in any kind shape or form. I love the way it is written and it sure helped me a lot. So if you like to succeed with a business this may give you some hints.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Deepthi

    Who wants to be more succesful in their lives??? Who feels like they can do better but don't know how to do it??? C'mon, people... just read it... It's a must read book, and trust me when I say it's going to help you... It helped me a lot

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This is one of my favorite books of its' kind. David J. Schwartz teaches that if we can conceive it; then we can believe it, and if we can believe it; we can achieve it. He goes into detail on how to create the correct mindset for success. I highly recommend this book to all. Enjoy and Be Blessed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David P.

    My Dad assigned me to read a book sometime in late November. The book he assigned me to read was The Magic of Thinking Big by Dr. David J. Schwartz, one of the leaders on the art of motivation (according to the back of the book, anyway. According to my Dad, this book would give me great principles on how to be successful in life. In this regard, the book succeeds greatly. Along with that, Dr. Schwartz makes it interesting to read about the success principles. So, what is The Magic of Thi My Dad assigned me to read a book sometime in late November. The book he assigned me to read was The Magic of Thinking Big by Dr. David J. Schwartz, one of the leaders on the art of motivation (according to the back of the book, anyway. According to my Dad, this book would give me great principles on how to be successful in life. In this regard, the book succeeds greatly. Along with that, Dr. Schwartz makes it interesting to read about the success principles. So, what is The Magic of Thinking Big about? The book does not really feature a storyline, a plot, or main characters (although Dr. Schwartz does mention people who succeeded on his principles. Instead, it talks about principles on how to be a successful person in life. Some of these life lessons include dreaming creatively, using goals to promote growth, and thinking like a leader; and within The Magic of Thinking Big, Dr. Schwartz uses real life people in relation to these principles. Throughout The Magic of Thinking Big, Dr. Schwartz provides real-life examples of how people succeeded by using the discussed principle. Also, Dr. Scwartz constantly mentions situation where people did not apply the discussed principle, and as a result, the person failed at reaching a goal and becoming successful. I feel that The Magic of Thinking Big did a great job at teaching me these life lessons. For one thing, Dr. Schwartz uses the examples of people in his book, and these examples help hammer the point home. Also, Dr. Schwartz seems like a qualified person, so that makes his principles trustworthy. But the real reason that The Magic of Thinking Big was so effective at teaching me was this: It was fun to read. You can have a great educational book, but if it's boring, then no one would read it, and its lessons would never be taught. The Magic of Thinking Big, however, is a fun book to read. I found the book hard to put down at times, and because it was actually interesting and fun to read, the The Magic of Thinking Big gets its point across extremely well. The bottom line is, you should probably read this book sometime in your life. It gives some of the best principles I've read in a long time, and not only that, the book is fun to read. The double whammy of education and entertainment that The Magic of Thinking Big pretty much makes it a must-read book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    This is very good as historical sociology more than as self-help. I think this stuff was relevant especially for the generation that came of age in the Great Depression and World War II in America. Those people had been through hell, but then emerged into a booming economy with a ballooning middle-class. They needed a kick in the pants to stop thinking negatively. And the (white) guy who wanted to succeed big could rise above the masses by being a go-getter. The "American Dream" of upward mobili This is very good as historical sociology more than as self-help. I think this stuff was relevant especially for the generation that came of age in the Great Depression and World War II in America. Those people had been through hell, but then emerged into a booming economy with a ballooning middle-class. They needed a kick in the pants to stop thinking negatively. And the (white) guy who wanted to succeed big could rise above the masses by being a go-getter. The "American Dream" of upward mobility was real then for millions of people. This continued for the Baby Boomers who were born into that, but I think the system was falling apart by Gen X. As the daily news verifies, and as the author of "Detroit" says, we now live in a culture of corruption and incompetence. As such, the basic assumptions of "Thinking Big" (do a good job and you will be rewarded ...) cease to be a reliable norm. For people who want to rise above "average" without being corrupt, I think something like "Mastery" might be more useful nowadays. The aspects that are about breaking unrealistic negative thought loops are basically CBT and are timeless. So for people who would not read a "psych" book but want a mental boost, I could see how Dr. Schwartz could be very helpful. A distinction that makes Schwartz better than a lot of current psychobabble is that he is not telling everyone "You can do anything!" Everybody can't do anything, but what many people can do is improve their lot with action steps that are under their control and that will improve their lives incrementally if they follow through on them.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mason Frierson

    It’s always shady when you see someone using the usual cliché "This book has changed my life!". While I usually don't take those comments seriously (too much money wasted in 'life-changing' books, I guess) I have to admit that sometimes a particular book hits you with more impact than usual and after a couple of years some self-examination might leave you with the impression that perhaps the author has indeed influenced your choice of paths more than you would have expected. This was It’s always shady when you see someone using the usual cliché "This book has changed my life!". While I usually don't take those comments seriously (too much money wasted in 'life-changing' books, I guess) I have to admit that sometimes a particular book hits you with more impact than usual and after a couple of years some self-examination might leave you with the impression that perhaps the author has indeed influenced your choice of paths more than you would have expected. This was the case with me and Dr. Schwartz's "The Magic of Thinking Big". I am not an intense fan of self-help and motivational literature, but do read a title or two now and then. I have read many of the classics like Stephen Covey's "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" and others like "The Miracle Morning”, "The War of Art", “Extreme Ownership" and many more that have sold millions, are mentioned everywhere and everybody seems to love. The fact is that so far no book of this kind has proven to be as effective with me as this one. This is the kind of title where you read things you already know, you are after all mostly just looking for motivation. That extra push to get you going in particular moments when things aren't flowing as easily as you'd wish. And for that use, my preference goes to books that have an honest simplicity. This title isn't verbose, it isn't very technical or full or scholarship, perhaps even some of its examples are fully fictional. The truth is that I don't care about that, because it has proven very effective. If you are looking for something to motivate you (in any area), I suggest you try this title first. The effect with you might be quite different. The results won't be magic, but I'm pretty sure the improvement will be easy to notice.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Soheil

    A book that is focused on telling you that "you are what you think". To tell you that whatever you think of in your mind will become reality whether it would be positive or negative thoughts. It gives you practical programs and steps to change your outlook and the way you think and prepares you for a successful life ahead full of achievements of your own thinking. The book's philosophy is solid. Whatever is said here conforms with whatever you may have read or heard elsewhere. While t A book that is focused on telling you that "you are what you think". To tell you that whatever you think of in your mind will become reality whether it would be positive or negative thoughts. It gives you practical programs and steps to change your outlook and the way you think and prepares you for a successful life ahead full of achievements of your own thinking. The book's philosophy is solid. Whatever is said here conforms with whatever you may have read or heard elsewhere. While the book is great, for me it resembled more of a literature review of the works I had read in the past. Nothing ground breaking to occupy my mind. But then again that may not be the fault of the author. The only fault is that this book was recommended to me after I had read much more in this field and thus failed to astonish me in the way I would have been had I read it before anything else.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amir Tesla

    Lots of wisdom and thought provoking ideas with practical applications in different domains of life from personal affairs, family, social interactions to leadership. This book is definitely ranks among top 5 self-improvement books.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nani

    One of the best business books I've read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nigham

    First published in 1959, The Magic of Thinking Big is one of the most influential self-help books of all-times. The writer provides schemes and strategies for visualizing yourself achieving your goals. Things I have learned from this book: ♦ To "think confidently, act confidently" practice the following exercises: 1. Be a front seater 2. Practice making eye contact 3. Walk 25 percent faster 4. Practice speaking up 5. Smile Big ♦ "There’s nothing magical nor First published in 1959, The Magic of Thinking Big is one of the most influential self-help books of all-times. The writer provides schemes and strategies for visualizing yourself achieving your goals. Things I have learned from this book: ♦ To "think confidently, act confidently" practice the following exercises: 1. Be a front seater 2. Practice making eye contact 3. Walk 25 percent faster 4. Practice speaking up 5. Smile Big ♦ "There’s nothing magical nor mystical about the power of belief. Belief works this way. Belief, “The-I-am-positive-I-can” attitude, generates the power, skill, the energy, needed to do. When you believe “I-can-do-it, the how-to-do-it” develops." ♦ "The "Okay-I-will-give-it-a-try-but-I-don’t-think-it-will-work-attitude” produces failure." ♦ "Think doubt and fail Think victory and succeed" ♦ "Respect the leader, learn, observe and study him but don’t worship him. Believe that you can surpass." ♦ "Most of us make two basic errors with respect to intelligence ~ We underestimate our own brain power, and ~ We overestimate the other fellow's brain power."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    The Chicago Tribune asked all the local primary candidates what their favorite book was. Of course, the liberal wonks put in stuff by Lincoln or Locke. The right wingers were typically imaginative in their selection of "The Bible." The tea party candidate, Adam Andrejewski, chose this book which intrigued me. Also, his choice for "the book you would take on a desert island" was "How to survive on a desert island." So, I liked the cut of his jib. I'm a fan of self-improvement books and The Chicago Tribune asked all the local primary candidates what their favorite book was. Of course, the liberal wonks put in stuff by Lincoln or Locke. The right wingers were typically imaginative in their selection of "The Bible." The tea party candidate, Adam Andrejewski, chose this book which intrigued me. Also, his choice for "the book you would take on a desert island" was "How to survive on a desert island." So, I liked the cut of his jib. I'm a fan of self-improvement books and this one presents the same basic idea in some new packaging. Here's the points I really liked about it. 1) It asked you to think of your most successful friends and your most unsuccessful ones and deconstruct why they are that way. The book's deconstruction method is a little vague but the answer is attitude, optimism and most importantly the power to "think big". 2) When bogged down in life's problems a quick fix is to ask whether addressing this particular problem is "Thinking Big". If it's not, it's probably a waste of your time and you should move onto "bigger things".

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Garza

    Third time through. It's amazing how a person's thinking is always in the process of becoming small and marginalizing itself. This is a must read for anyone wanting to increase their thinking and pull the weeds out of their life. [The second time reading this book was very helpful. It's amazing what you can forget and need to be reminded of. I absolutely love the final 2-3 pages. A great summary of what it takes to be successful in any endeavor.] [This book is just what the Third time through. It's amazing how a person's thinking is always in the process of becoming small and marginalizing itself. This is a must read for anyone wanting to increase their thinking and pull the weeds out of their life. [The second time reading this book was very helpful. It's amazing what you can forget and need to be reminded of. I absolutely love the final 2-3 pages. A great summary of what it takes to be successful in any endeavor.] [This book is just what the doctor ordered. When your thinking starts to focus on the small things in life, you need to read this book to help you focus on the BIG things that will take you to a more successful life. Not only can this book inspire you to think bigger, but it also presents concrete strategies to achieve your big goals. A must read... I'm so glad to have read it and will be sure to keep it handy to read again in the future.]

  28. 5 out of 5

    Douglas

    This was a top book in four hour workweek and the title seems relevant to my career trajectory. I just picked this book up again. The first 200 pages were ok, but the last 100 were solid. Its a lot about setting goals, taking action and dreaming big. Some really great comments about how to react to adversity and stay focused on your goal. A worthwhile read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ramu Vairavan

    Professor Schwartz shares a tonne of anecdotes in his book. For all the sensitive and candid stories he shared, he must have been blacklisted (or Schwartz-listed) by some, but some of those were indeed gems. Everyone can find something here that resonates with them, and what exactly will probably differ person to person. The emphasis is definitely big on thinking big, but Schwartz also touches on other aspects of thinking like creative and positive thinking. It is not a boo Professor Schwartz shares a tonne of anecdotes in his book. For all the sensitive and candid stories he shared, he must have been blacklisted (or Schwartz-listed) by some, but some of those were indeed gems. Everyone can find something here that resonates with them, and what exactly will probably differ person to person. The emphasis is definitely big on thinking big, but Schwartz also touches on other aspects of thinking like creative and positive thinking. It is not a book I could read cover to cover in a single day. I feel it's also not for one time reading. It is a book that I see myself returning to time to time for selective rereading. This time I had chosen to take it in slowly, a chapter a day. It was a great source of oomph for the day ahead, and will be for the days ahead.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christian D. Orr

    Think Big, Dream Big, Achieve Big "THE MAGIC OF THINKING BIG" by David J. Schwartz This is my second-time reading this book (first time being in 1999, shortly after I joined the Amway biz and shortly before I joined the Air Force), and after these years I still find it to be one of the best self-help books I've ever read. True enough, a lot of the material that Dr. Schwartz teaches within is seemingly common sense that should be boneheadedly obvious....yet in this day & Think Big, Dream Big, Achieve Big "THE MAGIC OF THINKING BIG" by David J. Schwartz This is my second-time reading this book (first time being in 1999, shortly after I joined the Amway biz and shortly before I joined the Air Force), and after these years I still find it to be one of the best self-help books I've ever read. True enough, a lot of the material that Dr. Schwartz teaches within is seemingly common sense that should be boneheadedly obvious....yet in this day & age, common sense really ain't so common, and it's all to easy to lose track of the principles & power of positive thinking when we're surrounded by so much toxic negativity in the world RANDOM STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS (and noteworthy passages): --p. 2: "There is magic in thinking big. 'If Thinking Big accomplishes so much, why doesn’t everyone think that way?' I’ve been asked that question many times. Here, I believe, is the answer. All of us, more than we recognize, are products of the thinking around us. And much of this thinking is little, not big. All around you is an environment that is trying to tug you, trying to pull you down Second Class Street." Hear, hear! Negative Nancys, Dream Killers, Debbie Downers, and Oxygen Thieves! Or as Gabe Suarez terms 'em, "Rats, Shoemakers, and Lizards." --p. 3: "...there is at least 50 times as much competition for jobs on Second Class Street as for jobs on First Class Avenue. First Class Avenue, U.S.A., is a short, uncrowded street." A First Class travel junkie like me takes heart in this! "....minds like Milton, who in Paradise Lost wrote, 'The mind is its own place and in itself can make a heaven of hell or a hell of heaven.'" I've witnessed this myself repeatedly, in school, the military, law enforcement, and contracting alike. --p. 4: "Start out with this thought of the great philosopher Disraeli: 'Life is too short to be little.'" Ah, if only the late great USC Professor and leadership guru Warren Bennis (G-d rest his soul and Fight On Forever) were still around to discuss that particular quote! --p. 12: "Currently, there is some talk of building a tunnel under the English Channel to connect England with the Continent. Whether this tunnel is ever built depends on whether responsible people believe it can be built." And yes, Dr. Schwartz (may you Rest In Peace), the Chunnel has long since become a reality. --p. 37: "We often hear that knowledge is power. But this statement is only a half-truth. Knowledge is only potential power. Knowledge is power only when put to use—and then only when the use made of it is constructive." "Einstein taught us a big lesson. He felt it was more important to use your mind to think than to use it as a warehouse for facts." [author's original emphasis] --p. 39: "Ask yourself, 'Am I using my mental ability to make history, or am I using it merely to record history made by others?'" Wow, powerful stuff right there!! --p. 50: "Jot that down in your success rule book right now. Action cures fear." [author's original emphasis] --p. 131: "Pay twice as much and buy half as many." (Regarding wardrobe) --p. 154: "Let’s face it. Some folks, being jealous, want to make you feel embarrassed because you want to move upward.....It happens in the military service when a clique of negative-minded individuals poke fun at and try to humiliate the young soldier who wants to go to officers’ school.....You’ve seen it happen time and again in high schools when a group of lunkheads deride a classmate who has the good sense to make the most of his educational opportunities and come out with high grades. Sometimes—and all too sadly often—the bright student is jeered at until he reaches the conclusion that it isn’t smart to be intelligent." I can relate from personal experience! --p. 165: "Go first class in everything you do. You can’t afford to go any other way." Life's too short to live it as a cheapo! --p. 182: "People like to be called by name. It gives everyone a boost to be addressed by name. Two special things you must remember. Pronounce the name correctly, and spell it correctly. If you mispronounce or misspell someone’s name, that person feels that you feel he is unimportant." (Similar to what Dale Carnegie teaches in "How to Win Friends and Influence People")

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