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Prodigy Vol. 1: The Evil Earth

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Edison Crane's not content being the world's smartest man and most successful businessman -- his brilliant mind needs constantly challenged. He's a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, genius composer, Olympic athlete and an expert in the occult, and now international governments are calling on him to fix problems they just can't handle. Collects Prodigy 1-6.


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Edison Crane's not content being the world's smartest man and most successful businessman -- his brilliant mind needs constantly challenged. He's a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, genius composer, Olympic athlete and an expert in the occult, and now international governments are calling on him to fix problems they just can't handle. Collects Prodigy 1-6.

30 review for Prodigy Vol. 1: The Evil Earth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Edison Crane’s wicked smaht. Then aliens want to invade and Satanic cult and Mark Millar really likes Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade and crap. Edison beats em all and whatever. Prodigy is another Millarworld turkey from the turkeymeister general. Having a protagonist who is beyond overpowered is so boring to read. Absolutely nothing phases this guy and any obstacle in his way is effortlessly dealt with. I’m surprised that if Edison is so supremely intelligent and egalitarian that there are a Edison Crane’s wicked smaht. Then aliens want to invade and Satanic cult and Mark Millar really likes Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade and crap. Edison beats em all and whatever. Prodigy is another Millarworld turkey from the turkeymeister general. Having a protagonist who is beyond overpowered is so boring to read. Absolutely nothing phases this guy and any obstacle in his way is effortlessly dealt with. I’m surprised that if Edison is so supremely intelligent and egalitarian that there are any problems whatsoever left in his world - surely if he was that brilliant a problem solver that his Earth would be a paradise? The story read almost exactly like The Last Crusade to me but it’s much less interesting when you have a flawless protagonist instead of the flawed, yet likeable, Indy. And I didn’t really like Edison much. He’s soooo insufferably boastful and arrogant. Sample line: “I’ve written three plays, designed a new telecommunications system and invented a polymer that keeps food fresh for a century. I also grew the company thirty percent last night.” And he goes on like that throughout the book. It’s not even that impressive, it’s just what an unimaginative person would think a conventionally intelligent person would do if they were extra brainy. The villains are so cartoonishly evil even by Millar’s laughably OTT standards. They’re called The Brotherhood of the Dragon and their base is The Castle of Darkness where they worship Satan and shoot children! I mean… wow. There’s just no artistic subtlety or any effort of making the villains anything more than the easy to hate bad guys. Such lazy writing. I liked that Edison got out of one sticky situation by appealing to the hired goons’ humanity rather than simply shooting them (which he did most of the time), and using his memory to memorize an entire building’s wall symbols by barrelling through it before it ‘sploded was imaginative. Rafael Albuquerque’s art is really great too. For a book about a clever dude though Prodigy is pretty dumb and reads more like something for kids - it’s that simplistic. Another hacky half-assed effort from Mark Millar.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Mark Millar is a pro’s pro (though fortunately not a bro’s bro—at least I don’t think he is—or a schmoe’s schmoe, though he could be a ho’s toe, which would be unfortunate for him, as it would mean he’d have to occasionally enter the mouth of a lusty gentleman with a foot fetish; now that 78% of those reading this have thrown up in their mouths and 22% of you are now uncomfortably aroused, let’s just move on). He knows how to set up and pace a story. The first issue of Prodigy is a ma Mark Millar is a pro’s pro (though fortunately not a bro’s bro—at least I don’t think he is—or a schmoe’s schmoe, though he could be a ho’s toe, which would be unfortunate for him, as it would mean he’d have to occasionally enter the mouth of a lusty gentleman with a foot fetish; now that 78% of those reading this have thrown up in their mouths and 22% of you are now uncomfortably aroused, let’s just move on). He knows how to set up and pace a story. The first issue of Prodigy is a master class in who/what/when/where/why/how. The art is stellar throughout, and, cover to cover, it’s a fast-paced, entertaining read. So, why three stars? Well, let me ask you this—when’s the last time you heard something like, “Ah, yes. I remember it will. In fact, I’ll never forget it. Thailand, January of 1989—I had just suffered the worst breakup of my life, which had happened on Christmas Eve, and after dealing with the familial fallout from that very public and messy scene—the details of which are better left unsaid, if only for reasons of propriety—I decided that a journey to Phuket was in order, both to get some space and to try to reconcile my feelings not only about the woman, but about the way it ended. I’d picked up a pack of gum at a bustling stall in the market in Phuket City and had retired to the bungalow I’d rented, content to gaze out over the Andaman Sea and ponder deep ponderings. I reached absently into my pocket and withdrew the pack of gum—watermelon Bubblicious, though I’d paid no attention at the time, so busy was I wallowing in the misery of my broken heart—and popped a piece into my mouth. My jaw worked of its own accord, muscle memory accumulated over the course of decades and thousands of pieces chewed taking over, and my thoughts drifted back to her, the one, my own Irene Adler. Slowly, I began to work the gum into more malleable form as I wondered whether it was truly over, whether there was a chance for reconciliation, and, without thinking, I began to work up a bubble. But, not just any bubble mind you—a bubble that would become the biggest I had ever blown. And when that bubble popped, leaving its sticky residue all over my face and infesting my beard in such a way that it would take weeks before I could run my fingers through it without them getting stuck. With the concussive force of that explosion, my thoughts snapped into place, and I knew the answer. I knew exactly what I had to do—not just to win her back, but to cure cancer, feed starving orphans, and solve climate change. I chewed my gum vigorously and voraciously, never more alive than I was in that moment, and I leaped to my feet, a renewed and recharged man with both the energy and the wherewithal to change the world. And that, my friend, is how I became the savior of humanity and history’s greatest lover, and why I still carry that chewed piece of gum with me everywhere I go today, bronzed and tucked into a special compartment in my wallet, for it was truly the greatest piece of gum I ever chewed and I owe everything to it.” I’ll answer for you—except for one contrarian jackass who’s going to post something like that in the comments below, you have NEVER heard ANYONE ever talk about their favorite piece of bubblegum because, while enjoyable for the first three minutes of its consumption, you never, EVER think about that particular piece again after you spit it out. And that’s Prodigy. It’s bubblegum. Sure, I’ll chew another piece, but I don’t think this first volume will cross my mind again until I have the next pack in hand, you know? That’s why three stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    This was easy to breeze through but it wasn't very entertaining. The hero is the smartest person in the world. He's so far ahead of everyone else who's already won before he even starts. There's just not much interesting about a flawless protagonist. On top of that, the villains are so over the top maniacal that it was hard to take them seriously. I'm surprised their leader didn't twirl his mustache as they hunt down children for sport. Rafael Albuquerque's art was fantastic though.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Pretty much absolute garbage and I have to believe it's satire to stay sane because I have no idea why else it would've been published. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 1.125

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Just as I began writing this I looked up something regarding Warren Ellis' Simon Spector. I was really going to compare Edison Crane and Simon Spector, and then I began to wonder if Spector inspired Crane. The two are amazingly similar. Both are extremely intelligent and based off of how they are drawn African-American Men. Spector was inspired by Ellis wanting to do a modern take on the pulps (Spector was a Holmes/Doc Savage pastiche if you will). Crane comes across as very pulp inspired, and C Just as I began writing this I looked up something regarding Warren Ellis' Simon Spector. I was really going to compare Edison Crane and Simon Spector, and then I began to wonder if Spector inspired Crane. The two are amazingly similar. Both are extremely intelligent and based off of how they are drawn African-American Men. Spector was inspired by Ellis wanting to do a modern take on the pulps (Spector was a Holmes/Doc Savage pastiche if you will). Crane comes across as very pulp inspired, and Crane is very much in the Doc Savage adventurer/fight evil mode. With all of that out of the way, this was a very entertaining read because so few writers are able to pull off the pulp feel, even if they are doing a pastiche. If Spector inspired Crane so be it. Millar elected to do six issues, whereas Ellis only did one (yay, because I did enjoy all six issues). It has been a long time since I've enjoyed a character who is essentially perfect at everything and solves six impossible problems before 9 a.m. Here, the problem propelling the story forward is an invasion of Earth from another dimension (there is more happening beside that). Turn off your brain, grab some popcorn and enjoy the ride. (read as digital floppies).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    This is a book about a villain trying to bring about an alien invasion from a parallel Earth. And yet the only true evil alien invader here is Mark Millar. All I can ask is that Mark stops writing comics and retires on the bundles of money he's already made with his horrible power-fantasy drivel. All you need to understand why this is horrible is the fact that the main character is a super-mega-ultra genius who can solve all of the world's problems and is never wrong. There are NO sta This is a book about a villain trying to bring about an alien invasion from a parallel Earth. And yet the only true evil alien invader here is Mark Millar. All I can ask is that Mark stops writing comics and retires on the bundles of money he's already made with his horrible power-fantasy drivel. All you need to understand why this is horrible is the fact that the main character is a super-mega-ultra genius who can solve all of the world's problems and is never wrong. There are NO stakes. There is NO danger. It's just Millar going "what if a superhero but even more overpowered? wow, wouldn't that be interesting? bring me my crayons!". At least Albuquerque is still a masterful artist and I'm sure he's getting a juicy payout on this so, yay, good for him.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ramon

    Sure, there's a bit of fun in seeing what Millar can come up with as far as showing how much of a genius Crane is, but who cares, ultimately? When there are no stakes, no tension, because the guy's unbeatable? And Millar, man, speaking as a fan, you've gotta break free of this formula you've been repeating for how many books now. Set up world, waste 2 issues on red herrings, a betrayal, and then a twist where the hero had it in the bag all along. At least Albuquerque's art is pretty. But I want Sure, there's a bit of fun in seeing what Millar can come up with as far as showing how much of a genius Crane is, but who cares, ultimately? When there are no stakes, no tension, because the guy's unbeatable? And Millar, man, speaking as a fan, you've gotta break free of this formula you've been repeating for how many books now. Set up world, waste 2 issues on red herrings, a betrayal, and then a twist where the hero had it in the bag all along. At least Albuquerque's art is pretty. But I want hungry something-to-prove Millar, not lazy complacent Millar secure in his Netflix bucks trying to dole out franchises. Please. Challenge yourself. If you're going to get some of the world's best artists and take over half a year of their lives, do something great! Shoot for the moon!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Arjun Iyer

    Rating: 2.5/5 Blurb: Prodigious characters trapped within a pedestrian story. Edison Crane's story as the eponymous 'Prodigy' struck a chord with me in the early issues because he seemed like the crystallization (albeit an exaggerated crystallization) of every boyhood-fantasy that I've ever had. And I have no doubt it was a similar case for other readers. Edison is brilliant, resourceful, arrogant, cocky and yet, he possesses a humility that is often missing in characters such as he. Rating: 2.5/5 Blurb: Prodigious characters trapped within a pedestrian story. Edison Crane's story as the eponymous 'Prodigy' struck a chord with me in the early issues because he seemed like the crystallization (albeit an exaggerated crystallization) of every boyhood-fantasy that I've ever had. And I have no doubt it was a similar case for other readers. Edison is brilliant, resourceful, arrogant, cocky and yet, he possesses a humility that is often missing in characters such as he. Mark Millar has succeeded in providing us with a protagonist who despite his cliched qualities doesn't cloy the reading-palette and that is the only reason that I've given this series the rating that I did. While the protagonist is interesting, the plot was rather lackluster. To me, the whole story read like an unholy amalgamation of Avengers: Endgame & Indiana Jones with an Ozymandias-esque protagonist cutting an effortless swathe through the various obstacles that lie before him. It quickly became predictable and boring, with the only saving grace being the art, which I enjoyed. All in all, I felt that Prodigy was an interesting pitch for what could be a very entertaining series. However, the series would benefit immensely in my opinion if it gave us more insight into the size of Edison Crane's heart and not the size of his cranium.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jakub Kvíz

    Fun, action-packed adventure with gorgeous art by Rafael Albuquerque, funny/clever dialogues, interesting adversary and nice plot twists. 3,5*

  10. 5 out of 5

    Guilherme Smee

    Eu havia lido a primeira edição - distribuída gratuitamente na CCXP do ano passado no estande da Netflix - de Prodígio e havia gostado muito da premissa. Mas lendo esse quadrinho me parece que a fórmula de Mark Millar de fazer personagens fodões com explosões e momentos chocantes fodões e com sensos de moral fodões está dando no saco. Além disso tudo o quadrinho tem outra marca de estilo de Millar que é inserir bem no final de tudo, um deus ex machina que muda toda a situação do jogo estabelecid Eu havia lido a primeira edição - distribuída gratuitamente na CCXP do ano passado no estande da Netflix - de Prodígio e havia gostado muito da premissa. Mas lendo esse quadrinho me parece que a fórmula de Mark Millar de fazer personagens fodões com explosões e momentos chocantes fodões e com sensos de moral fodões está dando no saco. Além disso tudo o quadrinho tem outra marca de estilo de Millar que é inserir bem no final de tudo, um deus ex machina que muda toda a situação do jogo estabelecido por aqui. Mas o companheiro artístico de Millar em suas empreitadas também conta bastante. Aqui neste Prodígio a arte fica a cargo do gaúcho Rafael Albuquerque, que também desenvolve um trabalho incrível na primeira edição e depois decai um monte nas edições seguintes. Esses fatores tornam os trabalhos da dupla nesse Prodígio menos admiráveis, ou ainda, menos prodigiosos como gostam de divulgá-los. Comparar este trabalho com Huck, outro trabalho dos dois, daria uma bela análise que eu não vou fazer, mas recomendaria a vocês tentarem estabelecer os paralelos entre a engenhosidade de uma obra e a simplicidade de outra.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    The first couple of issues were pretty good. Especially when the two kids are playing together. Pretty funny. But really at the end of the day, like many mark Millar comics, the story lacks depth. The ending is always absurd and crazy and world-threatening, it it's action packed. But there's no depth to the characters or the story. I like the comics. They are fun. But they don't offer anything beyond the obvious.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    My favorite sub genre of fiction is stories about what it would be like to be extremely intelligent, written by idiots. When I saw that Mark Millar, a college dropout, has written just such a story I had to locate a copy as soon as possible. This book did not disappoint! You can make a checklist of all the things that dummies think smart people like, opera, classical music, chess, etc. and you can be assured that the character will do most to all of these things. Just starting at the cover we h My favorite sub genre of fiction is stories about what it would be like to be extremely intelligent, written by idiots. When I saw that Mark Millar, a college dropout, has written just such a story I had to locate a copy as soon as possible. This book did not disappoint! You can make a checklist of all the things that dummies think smart people like, opera, classical music, chess, etc. and you can be assured that the character will do most to all of these things. Just starting at the cover we have the hero holding a book and a gun, surrounded by “math”, a chess board, a violin, and a large number of books with the spines facing away from the viewer so that the artist wouldn’t have to actually know what kind of books might be read by an intellectual. I hope they make a poster of this beautiful nonsense! Nearly every page there is something that makes no sense, or doesn’t work as portrayed. Nearly every decision is not something an actual intelligent person would do. Can you imagine Albert Einstein jumping the Grand Canon on a motorcycle? Some of my favorites included talking underwater, traveling anywhere with the assumption that he wouldn’t be recognized by every person, and relying on others to perform at a precision timing for idiotic schemes (twice jumping out of buildings onto moving vehicles). It should go without saying that Millar has no idea how the brain works. Our hero was so dumb that he performed open heart surgery on his friend in his bedroom with no medical equipment, nor even gloves! JUST FUCKING THINK ABOUT THAT! He would be in jail for practicing medicine without a license! And of course there is the genre requirement of using a super brain to make money gambling. Multiple times in the story, he details people’s life story just by looking at them. Now Millar most likely got this idea from Sherlock Holmes, but Doyle explains how he does this “you can tell a lot about a man for the knee of his pant leg.” Here our hero is just omniscient. No explanation is needed. It’s the same device,but used by an obviously less talented writer. The plot is generic, the villains laughable, and the end insulting. I gave it one star, but I could just a soon give it one million!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    One of the many characteristic flaws in Mark Millar's comics is a tendency to have an omnicompetent character who finds everything stupidly easy – if they're the hero, throughout; if they're the villain, then until they meet the hero and get floored with one punch. Well, at least this time he seems to have taken the advice about making your faults your style, and is right on the edge of playing it for laughs. Edison Crane is, in short, the best at everything. Governments call him in to solve the One of the many characteristic flaws in Mark Millar's comics is a tendency to have an omnicompetent character who finds everything stupidly easy – if they're the hero, throughout; if they're the villain, then until they meet the hero and get floored with one punch. Well, at least this time he seems to have taken the advice about making your faults your style, and is right on the edge of playing it for laughs. Edison Crane is, in short, the best at everything. Governments call him in to solve the problems they can't and, while he's thinking about those, just to stop himself getting too bored, he takes challenges from schoolkids for impossible stunts like jumping the Grand Canyon, without a parachute, while on fire.  Another characteristic Millar flaw is a degree of gleeful nastiness reminiscent of the sort of teenage boy one's starting to worry about. That's here too, though again, framed forgivably; these days, the notion that the 1% are raised on entirely different moralities to the proles, to the extent of hunting poor children for sport, verges on stating the obvious. Turns out that's not just a product of broken social systems, though: they're descendants of an abortive invasion from another world, and the time has almost come to open the gate once more.  The battle between Crane and the cult plays out largely as you'd expect, all carefully choreographed violence, impossible escapes and smug quips. Albuquerque isn't an artist whose work excites me in the same way as some Millar collaborators, but he's very good, and pulls off both the micro-expressions and the macro-explosions this needs. Yes, it's clearly been in the works for a while, just from little details like how much territory ISIS controls, and in the meantime it's been overtaken by another, far more ambitious comic about the smartest man in the world fighting off an invasion from a nightmarish parallel Earth, Gillen and Wijngaard's Thunderbolt. But for the 20-odd minutes it takes to read a Millar collection, it's an entertainingly daft romp. Still, I can't help but feel that the inevitable Netflix adaptation risks being a right bloody slog, unless they pitch it somewhere between Crank and Ash Versus Evil Dead. (Edelweiss ARC)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm… I guess quite a few schoolchildren have tried to write a story featuring the brainiest person in the world, and failed to come up with anything that convinced. Mark Millar might be a better story-teller than a kid, and a lot more erudite for it, but on this evidence he's not up to it either. For one thing, he's gone the next logical step (ie counter-logical, for it buggers up any kind of storytelling nous), and made his brainiest person evs the safest person evs, so there is zero threat on Hmmm… I guess quite a few schoolchildren have tried to write a story featuring the brainiest person in the world, and failed to come up with anything that convinced. Mark Millar might be a better story-teller than a kid, and a lot more erudite for it, but on this evidence he's not up to it either. For one thing, he's gone the next logical step (ie counter-logical, for it buggers up any kind of storytelling nous), and made his brainiest person evs the safest person evs, so there is zero threat on these pages whatsoever. Get shot in a temple? Why, his eidetic memory will give him a Plan B window to jump out of, even if he's relying on Ms Average to fly past at the ideal nanosecond. Yup – "hmmm" isn't the word. We get a ragtag collection of exotic places, as our guy is on the trail of some ancient texts that tell of invasion from a parallel Earth, and because it has to be wrapped up in six tidy episodes it wraps itself up in six tidy episodes. Yup, not even the brightest brain on the planet can get a coherent path to the conclusion, for this ends in a very rushed and unconvincing manner. Taken as froth it's alright, but it's certainly no better than that. Two stars, while I feel generous.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    Brilliant, fast paced action graphic novel about a man who is the most intelligent man on earth . Edison Crane has a mind that is faster than Google. Not only can he speak any language, run a successful business and answer any question about anything, he can also protect the earth fighting enemies from another universe and enemies nearer home. Edison solves world problems and does so brilliantly. He is the man that governments call upon. When the world is threatened Edison risks life Brilliant, fast paced action graphic novel about a man who is the most intelligent man on earth . Edison Crane has a mind that is faster than Google. Not only can he speak any language, run a successful business and answer any question about anything, he can also protect the earth fighting enemies from another universe and enemies nearer home. Edison solves world problems and does so brilliantly. He is the man that governments call upon. When the world is threatened Edison risks life and limb to save the world using his intelligence with a flare! Alas not only one enemy threatens the earth but two, and Edison has to find a way to take on the alien invaders and protect the planet from an astroid that is hurtling towards earth. Can he do it? Yes he can! This is very enjoyable with so many unsupected twists and turns that keep the reader turning the pages. It is a roller coaster read with great artwork and definitely a series to follow. Copy provided via Edelweiss in exchange for an unbiased review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This one is pretty awesome. Not only is the character a kickass fighter, Einstein thinker, and ancient code breaker, but the artwork is killer. But there’s two things that make this comic unique. First is the way Millar represents the many parts of Edison’s subconscious: there are pages of this book drawn in large panels that show Edison solving the various problems. It’s him inside his brain in different roles that represent the many conflicts going on all at once. It’s hard for me to explain, This one is pretty awesome. Not only is the character a kickass fighter, Einstein thinker, and ancient code breaker, but the artwork is killer. But there’s two things that make this comic unique. First is the way Millar represents the many parts of Edison’s subconscious: there are pages of this book drawn in large panels that show Edison solving the various problems. It’s him inside his brain in different roles that represent the many conflicts going on all at once. It’s hard for me to explain, but it’s something I’ve never seen before. Second, the storytelling timeline is broken up in a couple episodes so that we see the end result of a chase or conflict and then the steps to get there. A little page flipping makes things clearer, but it is a great way to pull the reader in… Action and adventure. The Prodigy is one that shouldn’t be missed. For my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2019/09/06/pr... For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tarn Richardson

    Hugely enjoyable comic book pastiche of the world of the superhero, supervillan and masterminds who constantly save the planet from destruction. Beautifully illustrated, with some laugh out loud moments and gloriously ridiculous tongue-in-cheek scenes which both send up the superhero factory and engage and delight the reader. Definitely one for you to park your brain before reading, there's nothing here that one might call 'new' but there's still an originality and confidence in how M Hugely enjoyable comic book pastiche of the world of the superhero, supervillan and masterminds who constantly save the planet from destruction. Beautifully illustrated, with some laugh out loud moments and gloriously ridiculous tongue-in-cheek scenes which both send up the superhero factory and engage and delight the reader. Definitely one for you to park your brain before reading, there's nothing here that one might call 'new' but there's still an originality and confidence in how Mark Millar is willing (and able) to flaunt the rules and write something that will both delight and frustrate ardent superhero fans in equal measure. Personally, I really enjoyed it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dru

    Another book with this nu-Millar, who seems to show a bit of restraint when it comes to showing how awful his bad guys can be. This is a fine story. Sort of Bond meets Holmes. The one problem is that there is hardly any tension. Albuquerque's art is gorgeous and handles the action sequences very well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Lewis

    Inspirational and fun till the end. Feels like a movie--except no movie would get away with using such elaborate settings and set pieces for such short plot points. Seriously, this book is too short. 10/10 will read again

  20. 4 out of 5

    Travis Hartman

    Another fun blockbuster graphic novel from Mark Millar. If you're a fan of Millar's bombastic storytelling style than you're going to love this. On the other hand, if you're not a fan than this one won't sway you. Recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ollie Higgs

    A really entertaining read. Fast, Funny and wonderfully ridiculous. The type of story you can easily see being a film.

  22. 5 out of 5

    andrew y

    I can see how this would be a good Netflix series. I see less how it is a good comic. The art was nice though.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Decent book! Some fun bits! Sadly I saw the ending coming but if I hadn’t then it would have been five stars! Still good!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Lorenz

    3.5-Stars. Lots of style, little substance.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Fogg

    Reads like every other Mark Millar book. Art is pretty, though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Holmes

    INCREDIBLE! This is what I've been looking for. Sherlock Holmes? 007? Indiana Jones? It's all of that, but modern, and with a great main character! This is as fun as it gets!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    I like Mark Miller, and this book is drawn and written well. I’m on the lookout for the next ones.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    Really good I'm excited for the next set of issues.

  29. 5 out of 5

    James

    James Bond meets Tony Stark meets Evel Knievel meets Beethoven

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Meyer

    Tried to be like LIMITLESS, ends up being a washed up version of INDIANA JONES. Not as epic as Millar wants it to be IMO.

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