Hot Best Seller

Elvis in Vegas: How the King Reinvented the Las Vegas Show

Availability: Ready to download

The story of how Las Vegas saved Elvis and Elvis saved Las Vegas in the greatest musical comeback of all time. The conventional wisdom is that Las Vegas is what destroyed Elvis Presley, launching him on a downward spiral of drugs, boredom, erratic stage behavior, and eventually his fatal overdose. But in Elvis in Vegas, Richard Zoglin takes an alternate view, arguing that V The story of how Las Vegas saved Elvis and Elvis saved Las Vegas in the greatest musical comeback of all time. The conventional wisdom is that Las Vegas is what destroyed Elvis Presley, launching him on a downward spiral of drugs, boredom, erratic stage behavior, and eventually his fatal overdose. But in Elvis in Vegas, Richard Zoglin takes an alternate view, arguing that Vegas is where the King of Rock and Roll resurrected his career, reinvented himself as a performer, and created the most exciting show in Vegas history. Elvis’s 1969 opening night in Vegas was his first time back on a live stage in more than eight years. His career had gone sour—bad movies, and mediocre pop songs that no longer made the charts. He’d been dismissed by most critics as over the hill. But in Vegas he played the biggest showroom in the biggest hotel in the city, drawing more people for his four-week engagement than any other show in Vegas history. His performance got rave reviews, “Suspicious Minds” gave him his first number-one hit in seven years, and Elvis became Vegas’s biggest star. Over the next seven years, he performed more than 600 shows there, and sold out every one. Las Vegas was changed too. The intimate night-club-style shows of the Rat Pack, who made Vegas the nation’s premier live-entertainment center in the 1950s and ‘60s, catered largely to well-heeled older gamblers. Elvis brought a new kind of experience: an over-the-top, rock-concert-like extravaganza. He set a new bar for Vegas performers, with the biggest salary, the biggest musical production, and the biggest promotion campaign the city had ever seen. In doing so, he opened the door to a new generation of pop/rock performers, and brought a new audience to Vegas—a mass audience from Middle America that Vegas depends on for its success to this day. A classic comeback tale set against the backdrop of Las Vegas’s golden age, Richard Zoglin’s Elvis in Vegas is a feel-good story for the ages.


Compare

The story of how Las Vegas saved Elvis and Elvis saved Las Vegas in the greatest musical comeback of all time. The conventional wisdom is that Las Vegas is what destroyed Elvis Presley, launching him on a downward spiral of drugs, boredom, erratic stage behavior, and eventually his fatal overdose. But in Elvis in Vegas, Richard Zoglin takes an alternate view, arguing that V The story of how Las Vegas saved Elvis and Elvis saved Las Vegas in the greatest musical comeback of all time. The conventional wisdom is that Las Vegas is what destroyed Elvis Presley, launching him on a downward spiral of drugs, boredom, erratic stage behavior, and eventually his fatal overdose. But in Elvis in Vegas, Richard Zoglin takes an alternate view, arguing that Vegas is where the King of Rock and Roll resurrected his career, reinvented himself as a performer, and created the most exciting show in Vegas history. Elvis’s 1969 opening night in Vegas was his first time back on a live stage in more than eight years. His career had gone sour—bad movies, and mediocre pop songs that no longer made the charts. He’d been dismissed by most critics as over the hill. But in Vegas he played the biggest showroom in the biggest hotel in the city, drawing more people for his four-week engagement than any other show in Vegas history. His performance got rave reviews, “Suspicious Minds” gave him his first number-one hit in seven years, and Elvis became Vegas’s biggest star. Over the next seven years, he performed more than 600 shows there, and sold out every one. Las Vegas was changed too. The intimate night-club-style shows of the Rat Pack, who made Vegas the nation’s premier live-entertainment center in the 1950s and ‘60s, catered largely to well-heeled older gamblers. Elvis brought a new kind of experience: an over-the-top, rock-concert-like extravaganza. He set a new bar for Vegas performers, with the biggest salary, the biggest musical production, and the biggest promotion campaign the city had ever seen. In doing so, he opened the door to a new generation of pop/rock performers, and brought a new audience to Vegas—a mass audience from Middle America that Vegas depends on for its success to this day. A classic comeback tale set against the backdrop of Las Vegas’s golden age, Richard Zoglin’s Elvis in Vegas is a feel-good story for the ages.

30 review for Elvis in Vegas: How the King Reinvented the Las Vegas Show

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Elvis in Vegas: How the King Reinvented the Vegas Show by Richard Zoglin is a 2019 Simon & Schuster publication. A wildly entertaining and juicy piece of pop culture history!! Elvis truly resonated with my mother’s generation, back in the fifties and sixties, but not so much with me. He was before my time, and frankly, I just couldn’t understand what all the fuss was about. I didn’t see in him, what legions of fans apparently did. For decades, I sneered when someone mentioned Elvis as a pion Elvis in Vegas: How the King Reinvented the Vegas Show by Richard Zoglin is a 2019 Simon & Schuster publication. A wildly entertaining and juicy piece of pop culture history!! Elvis truly resonated with my mother’s generation, back in the fifties and sixties, but not so much with me. He was before my time, and frankly, I just couldn’t understand what all the fuss was about. I didn’t see in him, what legions of fans apparently did. For decades, I sneered when someone mentioned Elvis as a pioneer of rock and roll. I thought he was vastly overrated and felt that if a title, such as ‘The King of Rock and Roll’, must be applied, Chuck Berry was far more deserving of it than Elvis. However, these days, Elvis seems to slip further and further from our mainstream consciousness- unless you happen to be in Las Vegas, that is. Even now Elvis remains a mainstay in Sin City. In fact, very recently an Elvis impersonator performed the wedding ceremony for a popular ‘It’ couple, which made the rounds on social media. It was the first time I’d thought of Elvis in years. Elvis is synonymous with Vegas and the big theatrical stage show that became the norm once he set up a residency there. For many, however, it also signifies Elvis’s downfall- the place where he became a parody of himself, becoming bloated and out of shape and dependent on drugs, going through the motions with no enthusiasm. While it is true that Elvis became bored and restless, and fell prey to his own celebrity and gaudiness, Richard Zoglin shows us a different side of that coin- The author takes readers on a fascinating journey back to Vegas’ beginnings, through the age of mob -controlled casinos, the peak of night club performances, the ups and downs of the entertainment mecca, and through Elvis’s tenure as Vegas’ top draw. I never realized what a big impact Elvis had on Vegas. I guess I never really thought about how his show transformed the city and the future of all other popular shows and spectacular stage performances since then. If not for Elvis, I’m not sure what path Vegas may have traveled down, but I don’t think it would have flourished in the same way. For the record, this is not another Elvis biography, nor is it a dry history of Vegas. While some familiar ground is covered, this book is more of an analysis of how the city and its entertainment venues changed and adjusted over time, and how it evolved into the entertainment epicenter it is today. It also offers up many titillating details about major Vegas acts, like Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack. These are lesser known, and less flattering stories about the nightclub acts, some of which would certainly raise eyebrows today. It is also a nostalgic journey. I’d forgotten about some of the performers mentioned in this book and do remember how popular they were. I’d also forgotten how Howard Hughes took over Vegas for a time, shoving the mob out of the way. It was a bit weird to hear people like Florence Henderson and Paul Anka lament the lack of mob protection. When the mob was running things- Vegas was a safe place!! Wow! The author spent a bit too much time with Frank Sinatra. I realize he was the name most associated with Vegas before Elvis stepped into his shoes, and for some, his legacy is still steeped in Vegas lore. But I did grow a bit weary of Frank, wishing we could hurry up and move on into new territory. Vegas went through an identity crisis a time or two, especially as rock music began to become a dominant force, pushing crooners like Frank Sinatra to the sidelines. No rock performer or group wanted to play Vegas. It just wasn’t cool. It was where one ended up in their twilight years. But in many ways Elvis changed all that. Shows like Cirque du Soleil and performers like Celine Dion owe Elvis a debt of gratitude. Without him and his elaborate stage shows, it is unlikely that Vegas would be what it is today. Trust me, one doesn’t need to be an Elvis fan to enjoy this book. I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys history or pop culture. The author has written a dazzling Vegas showcase giving Elvis a bit of overdue credit, and this time I must concur- he was a pioneer after all- a Vegas pioneer, and this time he earned the respect. So, let’s hand it to him. Elvis changed Vegas, gave it a new lease on life, one the city continues to benefit from, and will for some time to come.

  2. 4 out of 5

    *TUDOR^QUEEN*

    On a personal note, my husband is a huge Elvis fan. If it's the weekend and he decides to have a few beers and gets a bit maudlin, I'll find him watching an old VHS tape of "Elvis in Hawaii" or "The '68 Comeback Special" and crying...especially when Elvis sings the song "If I can Dream", the closer to "The '68 Comeback Special". Also, our wedding first dance was to "Love me Tender", and I can still see our wedding guests surrounding us in a circle, with emotional expressions. My now 18 year old On a personal note, my husband is a huge Elvis fan. If it's the weekend and he decides to have a few beers and gets a bit maudlin, I'll find him watching an old VHS tape of "Elvis in Hawaii" or "The '68 Comeback Special" and crying...especially when Elvis sings the song "If I can Dream", the closer to "The '68 Comeback Special". Also, our wedding first dance was to "Love me Tender", and I can still see our wedding guests surrounding us in a circle, with emotional expressions. My now 18 year old son's band performs a mean "A Little Less Conversation" and "Blue Suede Shoes" which their audiences just love. I was lured into his legend back in the 80's when I read his ex-wife Priscilla Beaulieu Presley's autobiography called "Elvis & Me". It was also made into a mini-series. My gosh, that book was so juicy in details but honestly and well-written that my paperback was dog-eared before long! Elvis was such a fascinating individual, and all his friends and associates have so many interesting stories to tell. I've read many biographies about him over the years. As I sit here writing tonight, I'll be leaving for a road trip to Graceland tomorrow! I had my dream twenty years ago when I visited London and Liverpool for my Beatles/Monarchy passions, so now it's my husband's turn. So I delved into this tome anxious to read about Elvis, not realizing that there would be a big buildup...a comprehensive overview of the entertainment industry in Vegas...years before Elvis conquered it. It covered "The Rat Pack" consisting of Sammy Davis Jr., Dean Martin, Joey Bishop, Peter Lawford - and most importantly - Frank Sinatra! The stories about Frank Sinatra depicting his rages when he thought he'd been slighted, and the mafia connection lingering in his background...were compelling. The book is extremely well-researched and written, much like another book I've read this year, "Castle on Sunset". Even though I wasn't that interested in some of the old entertainers covered in the lead up to Elvis's Vegas triumph, the writing was so superb that I was willing to hang in there. However, at about the 45% point I got a tad frustrated and did a fast skim to arrive at my happy place, when Elvis was to take on Las Vegas with a spectacularly planned and executed show. So, at around 50% I was solidly in Elvis land, where I wanted to be. Little anecdotes were sprinkled throughout the book about him from the beginning, but I was anxious to read about Elvis and stay there. At this point in the book where Elvis was planning his show, calling the shots 100% about what he wanted for his musical presentation (and not cow towing to his manager Colonel Tom Parker), I got the chills...good ones! Hearing about the way Elvis coalesced his band, what songs he was going to sing (just the mention of them gave me more chills; "Suspicious Minds", "In the Ghetto", "Memories", etc.) The detailed accounts of his various stage jumpsuits, what celebrities visited him backstage, what the critics had to say. Then the years ahead where he fell into decline with obesity, drug addiction, silly banter between songs, etc., until his passing in August of 1977. I was about 85% through the book when it surprisingly ended, followed by extensive footnotes. So, I enjoyed the first half of the book, but REALLY enjoyed the next 35%. The cover of this book is brilliant, but a bit misleading if you were expecting the entire book to be about Elvis. Still, I'm going to rate this 3.5 stars bumped up to 4 because this was a quality book with great writing and historical research. Thank you to the publisher Simon & Schuster who provided an advance reader copy via NetGalley.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ylenia

    I love Elvis & I’ve always been fascinated by Las Vegas - so this book was an instant-purchase. The book in itself was really interesting - but some parts failed to engage me & hold my attention completely. This could also be my fault for not being in the right mood 🤷🏻♀ I love Elvis & I’ve always been fascinated by Las Vegas - so this book was an instant-purchase. The book in itself was really interesting - but some parts failed to engage me & hold my attention completely. This could also be my fault for not being in the right mood 🤷🏻‍♀️

  4. 5 out of 5

    Larinda Agee

    Oh, how I love all things Elvis! I am a huge fan and have read many books on his life and its many aspects. Finding particular interest in his "Vegas Years", I was elated to be approved to read this story. What I found was a wonderful comeback story of the adventures of Elvis in not only the development and impact Vegas made on his life but what he did for Las Vegas during its "golden age" as well. For fans and non-fans (Is there even such a human who would exist?!), this is a must read. I found Oh, how I love all things Elvis! I am a huge fan and have read many books on his life and its many aspects. Finding particular interest in his "Vegas Years", I was elated to be approved to read this story. What I found was a wonderful comeback story of the adventures of Elvis in not only the development and impact Vegas made on his life but what he did for Las Vegas during its "golden age" as well. For fans and non-fans (Is there even such a human who would exist?!), this is a must read. I found it incredibly well-written and insightful to many questions I have had about his years and time there. I highly recommend this!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    The title is rather misleading, as the first half has much more to do with the rise of Las Vegas as an entertainment capital, while the second half climaxes with Elvis' first run at the International Hotel (now the Westgate). That said, it's a very fascinating look at both Elvis and Vegas, and how neither were ever the same after they collided.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a fascinating look at the evolution of entertainment acts in Vegas. Yes, it's about Elvis, but in my opinion it's more focused on how the lounge and stage acts of Vegas evolved (or didn't, in some cases) with the tastes of the American public. There were a lot of interesting anecdotes about Sinatra, Wayne Newton, and others that really captured the attitudes and tastes of that time. It did a great job of being a breezy yet informative read about a few defining decades in American enterta This is a fascinating look at the evolution of entertainment acts in Vegas. Yes, it's about Elvis, but in my opinion it's more focused on how the lounge and stage acts of Vegas evolved (or didn't, in some cases) with the tastes of the American public. There were a lot of interesting anecdotes about Sinatra, Wayne Newton, and others that really captured the attitudes and tastes of that time. It did a great job of being a breezy yet informative read about a few defining decades in American entertainment in what is perhaps the most extra of extra-American cities.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    Elvis brought Vegas to the forefront just when it was on the decline. The rat pack and other famous acts brought in many older gamblers but Elvis made it hip and young and attractive to the fun seekers and hot rollers. While drugs,sex, rock and roll may have been on the menu the notion that his singing career was just reaching it's peak is an understatement. He truly set a new bar for opening acts to achieve bringing with him higher salaried performers, larger acts more than the prior intimate nigh Elvis brought Vegas to the forefront just when it was on the decline. The rat pack and other famous acts brought in many older gamblers but Elvis made it hip and young and attractive to the fun seekers and hot rollers. While drugs,sex, rock and roll may have been on the menu the notion that his singing career was just reaching it's peak is an understatement. He truly set a new bar for opening acts to achieve bringing with him higher salaried performers, larger acts more than the prior intimate night club style shows, swanier hotels, and high time players. He commanded an audience's attention like no other and while the truth be told he was on a downward spiral with drugs and erratic behavior he certainly will always be remembered as the King of Rock and Roll. This book was well written, evenly distributed and not too historical in nature as to create boredom for the younger audience of readers. I highly recommend this work!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Elvis in Vegas by Richard Zoglin is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late July. Elvis' tenure at Las Vegas’ International Hotel from 1969 to 1976 and the post-heyday of Vegas entertainment. The way I’d describe this narrative is its sense of ‘halting bravado’ - you can practically hear a ‘skrill’ of rewind during a Vegas Strip tourism newsreel, going dizzyingly forward and back through time, while you feel uncertain of what’s going to be exclaimed about next. Elvis’ show planning doesn’t eve Elvis in Vegas by Richard Zoglin is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late July. Elvis' tenure at Las Vegas’ International Hotel from 1969 to 1976 and the post-heyday of Vegas entertainment. The way I’d describe this narrative is its sense of ‘halting bravado’ - you can practically hear a ‘skrill’ of rewind during a Vegas Strip tourism newsreel, going dizzyingly forward and back through time, while you feel uncertain of what’s going to be exclaimed about next. Elvis’ show planning doesn’t even kick in until the 58% mark, where there are some cracks at his between-song banter, some indication of critic’s response, then it all winds down fast before his death in 1977. All things considered, it would’ve worked considerably better as a series of articles than a book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Elvis in Vegas takes readers through a the history of Las Vegas from the days it basically was a junction point on a railroad line through the development of the Strip with lots of interesting stories about the entertainers brought in to draw patrons into the casinos. Readers learn about the mob connections, easy divorce laws, the rise of nudity, the humiliation early black entertainers endured. Reading this book was a wonderful trip down memory lane. It’s a who’s who of those who developed Vega Elvis in Vegas takes readers through a the history of Las Vegas from the days it basically was a junction point on a railroad line through the development of the Strip with lots of interesting stories about the entertainers brought in to draw patrons into the casinos. Readers learn about the mob connections, easy divorce laws, the rise of nudity, the humiliation early black entertainers endured. Reading this book was a wonderful trip down memory lane. It’s a who’s who of those who developed Vegas into the entertainment capital of the world. It also tells how music changed, chronicling the shifts occurring after the Beatles arrived, and pop standards began to give way to rock. Mob control and management styles began to change when Howard Hughes arrived and started buying property. Hughes brought in a bottom line corporate approach that dispensed with a lot of the perks formerly enjoyed. The author devotes many pages to Frank Sinatra, his volatile temper, his group known as the Rat Pack, and explains why even though Sinatra didn’t particularly like Elvis or have any appreciation for his music, he was instrumental in Elvis’ career. The baton truly was passed from the old Vegas king to the one and only King of rock ‘n roll on July 31, 1969, Presley’s first live performance in nearly a decade. Elvis arrived and Vegas was never the same. This is such a fun, informative and culturally significant story. For those of us who became teenagers in the fifties, Elvis was a huge part of those years. The author does a very good job describing and drawing readers into the excitement of seeing Elvis live...even when viewing him from the nosebleed section of a convention center as I was fortunate to do. There’s no way to properly do justice to this book in a review...you must read it for yourselves. My hope is the teasers given will spike your interest. I voluntarily reviewed an advance copy of this book from NetGalley. Most highly recommend.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Drago

    Zoglin does an excellent job of detailing the history of Las Vegas from its conception to the modern era and uses Elvis as a motif to package the entire narrative. The only real complaint I have is that the same anecdotes appear multiple times throughout (like Elvis's first reaction to Streisand opening the International Hotel). Engaging, easy ready.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bob Kuster

    A rockin and rollin good read !!! Elvis in Vegas was a pleasant surprise as the title made me think it would be all Elvis all the time. The book is so much more instead telling the story of the Las Vegas casino entertainment scene. Sinatra fans will be disappointed what they learn about Ol Blue Eyes. One for the money, two for the show, three get ready to read a good history.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    This book should have been titled "The Musical History of Vegas." There are 250 pages in the main part of the book, excluding "note and acknowledgments." The Elvis Vegas concert material starts on page 170, well over half way into the book. The book was very interesting, but the majority of it was about people and events before Elvis's arrive on the Vegas scene.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carol Custer

    This book is a must-read not only for Elvis fans, but for anyone interested in the history of Las Vegas. It's a fascinating insight into Las Vegas from its beginning to the present and how the city was influenced by changing times. The impact Elvis made on Las Vegas was huge - - and it was huge for his career as well. I saw Elvis live once in Las Vegas and though I've never been a huge fan, I liked him and his show was magical. I've seen Las Vegas change since the 70's when I first visited there This book is a must-read not only for Elvis fans, but for anyone interested in the history of Las Vegas. It's a fascinating insight into Las Vegas from its beginning to the present and how the city was influenced by changing times. The impact Elvis made on Las Vegas was huge - - and it was huge for his career as well. I saw Elvis live once in Las Vegas and though I've never been a huge fan, I liked him and his show was magical. I've seen Las Vegas change since the 70's when I first visited there and it was so interesting to read how these changes came about. A tremendous amount of research went into this book and it's well worth reading.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    If you love Vegas, Elvis, and the entertainers of Vegas, you will I’ve this book. As much a history of Vegas entertainment and the entertainers who played Vegas, as it is the story of Elvis’ Vegas comeback, this is just a great well written look at all these topics. Zoglin, who wrote a great biography of Bob Hope, really tells a great story here. Highly recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Henson

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I personally have not yet been to Las Vegas, so I did not know much about the history of Vegas, except of course how much Elvis loved Vegas, and how much Vegas loved Elvis. I learned so much about the history of the city in this book, and how it evolved through the years, especially the Rat Pack through to the Elvis years. Elvis would perform for the first time in Vegas on April 23, 1956 at the newly renovated New Frontier. The audience didn’t quite know what to t I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I personally have not yet been to Las Vegas, so I did not know much about the history of Vegas, except of course how much Elvis loved Vegas, and how much Vegas loved Elvis. I learned so much about the history of the city in this book, and how it evolved through the years, especially the Rat Pack through to the Elvis years. Elvis would perform for the first time in Vegas on April 23, 1956 at the newly renovated New Frontier. The audience didn’t quite know what to think of this young and rising star, and he got a mixed reception. However, after the army and nearly a decade of movies, Elvis would return to live performing. After his return to the stage in the ‘68 Comeback Special that aired December 3, 1968, the world was ready for Elvis Presley. Elvis never looked better. Still in his early 30’s, Elvis would in 1969 officially return to live performing at the new International Hotel in Vegas. His first show would be on July 31, 1969. He would perform two engagements a year, each engagement being two performances a night, for four weeks, without a night off. Elvis would play 636 shows in Vegas in seven years, and each one sold out, according to the hotel. His last Vegas engagement would be December of 1976. This book is perfect for any lover of Vegas, and of course Elvis. Elvis helped put Vegas back on the map during his time there, as people from all over the world and celebrities alike would flock to his shows. Long live Elvis Presley.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chad King

    The title should have been "Residency in Vegas: How Sinatra, Elvis and Hollywood Took Over Las Vegas." Yes, it talks about Elvis. And yes, Elvis had a significant impact on the modern Las Vegas show. But, as the book points out, Vegas developed into an entertainment mecca -- and one that could support an Elvis residency, no less -- due to the groundwork laid by hundreds of other artists, entertainers, promoters, developers, and builders beginning in the 1950s. Unfortunately the title doesn't con The title should have been "Residency in Vegas: How Sinatra, Elvis and Hollywood Took Over Las Vegas." Yes, it talks about Elvis. And yes, Elvis had a significant impact on the modern Las Vegas show. But, as the book points out, Vegas developed into an entertainment mecca -- and one that could support an Elvis residency, no less -- due to the groundwork laid by hundreds of other artists, entertainers, promoters, developers, and builders beginning in the 1950s. Unfortunately the title doesn't convey this part of the book (and it's not an insignificant part). The book is a worthwhile read for anyone interested in learning about how the Las Vegas entertainment industry developed between 1950 and 1980 or how Elvis impacted that development in the 1970's. Personally, I found the stories about Frank Sinatra more interesting than those about Elvis, so it was nice the author included those. I would have given it a 3.5, but I'll round up to a 4 for this one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    BrotherSkip

    Dreadful sentences like "Elvis began wearing a jewel-studded cape, spreading it wide and bowing his head dramatically, like some weird cross between Dracula and Jesus" with too much filler material that has no bearing on the premise made this a disappointing read. Sinatra driving a golf cart through the front of the casino and throwing chairs after Howard Hughes squashed Frank's credit for not paying back his gambling losses is great Vegas folklore but does nothing to prove what Zoglin was tryin Dreadful sentences like "Elvis began wearing a jewel-studded cape, spreading it wide and bowing his head dramatically, like some weird cross between Dracula and Jesus" with too much filler material that has no bearing on the premise made this a disappointing read. Sinatra driving a golf cart through the front of the casino and throwing chairs after Howard Hughes squashed Frank's credit for not paying back his gambling losses is great Vegas folklore but does nothing to prove what Zoglin was trying to show. There are several factual errors, author opinions and the Vegas history is so overwhelming, the Elvis information after 1971 reads like the old school Cliff Notes with so much missing information.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deanna Stevens

    I was extremely disillusioned with this book. First of all, the title is a come on. Elvis is barely mentioned in the first 30% of this book. Secondly, this is more of a history of Las Vegas entertainment. I also felt the book was extremely negative. Going on about political incorrectness about certain performers dialogues. This was over 50 years ago let it go! I could not finish the book. When the author started ripping a part the Elvis movies I enjoyed I had seen enough. This is not a book for I was extremely disillusioned with this book. First of all, the title is a come on. Elvis is barely mentioned in the first 30% of this book. Secondly, this is more of a history of Las Vegas entertainment. I also felt the book was extremely negative. Going on about political incorrectness about certain performers dialogues. This was over 50 years ago let it go! I could not finish the book. When the author started ripping a part the Elvis movies I enjoyed I had seen enough. This is not a book for an Elvis fan! I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my open and honest opinion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Elvis in Vegas is great exploration of the history of Las Vegas entertainment and of Las Vegas itself. It is a comprehensive journey of Elvis' return to live performing. Richard Zoglin does a fantastic job of capturing this wonderful period of Elvis Presley's epic story. I highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in Elvis or Las Vegas. Thanks to #NetGalley for an arc of #ElvisInVegas.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mauberley

    More a survey of what passes for entertainment in Las Vegas than all about Elvis’ ‘triumphant’ return in 1969, it is still a well-researched and vividly written book. Those of a certain age will be reminded of all of the dreadful comedians who once populated the Ed Sullivan show: Buddy Hackett, Sheckey Green, Jack Carter...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I was 9 years old when Elvis passed away in 1977. My mom LOVED Elvis, and I was very familiar with him. Mom played his music a lot, watched his films on TV. And as a family we watched his concert from Hawaii. This book looks at his 1969 Vegas shows. It takes it's time getting there, but I didn't mind the wait. The book was full of nice tidbits and trivia. It reminds us that for 1969-1970, Elvis was on top of his game.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike Walter

    An Enjoyable Look at Vegas' History I probable would rename this book because it's not as much about Elvis as it is Las Vegas and its history of entertainment through the years. But I enjoyed it nonetheless.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jason Sands

    The title is sort of deceptive The title is sort of deceptive. This is more of a history of entertainment in Las Vegas than it is a book about Elvis. Still, I found it to be entertaining.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Smith

    A fun read, but not a lot of Elvis. I would have liked less pre-amble and Frank Sinatra and more Elvis and analysis of how of his Vegas comeback impacted the music industry. That said, what is here is very entertaining to read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David

    Surprisingly entertaining and informative book. A history of Las Vegas, a bio of Elvis. And how Elvis’s comeback launched Vegas into what we see there today.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian Rothbart

    The title is. Very misleading. Most of the book is a history of Las Vegas and not about Elvis. It's an interesting read, but some of his opions are way off base.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Excellent.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Fritzov

    This is almost like 2 books in one. First it's a book about the history of Las Vegas entertainment and secondly it's a book about how Elvis changed the city for ever.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jillian McKee Loera

    This book was 65% the history of Las Vegas entertainment, which I personally enjoyed, but the title may be misleading for hardcore Elvis fans.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    A really nice overview of the entertainment industry in Vegas and Elvis' comeback. Well worth the time to read this book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.