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Perfect Match by Jodi Picoult Unabridged CD Audiobook

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Unabridged CD Audiobook 12 CDs / 14 houea lonf.... Narrated by Carol Monda , Susan Bennett, Michele O. Medlin


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Unabridged CD Audiobook 12 CDs / 14 houea lonf.... Narrated by Carol Monda , Susan Bennett, Michele O. Medlin

30 review for Perfect Match by Jodi Picoult Unabridged CD Audiobook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Crumb

    Consider this: What would you do in the name of justice? What would you do if someone harmed your child? And what would you do to protect them? These are the questions Nina Frost was faced with after she found out that her son, Nathaniel, was sexually abused. Nina made a living as an assistant district attorney. Her job was to prosecute the child molestors and rapists that preyed on little girls and boys. In her subconscious, she reasoned with herself that through this line of work, her perfect wo Consider this: What would you do in the name of justice? What would you do if someone harmed your child? And what would you do to protect them? These are the questions Nina Frost was faced with after she found out that her son, Nathaniel, was sexually abused. Nina made a living as an assistant district attorney. Her job was to prosecute the child molestors and rapists that preyed on little girls and boys. In her subconscious, she reasoned with herself that through this line of work, her perfect world could never be touched by the poison that she had locked away on a daily basis. How could Nina be so wrong? When I pick up a book by Jodi Picoult, I know I am being placed in capable hands. She is an expert at the art of the written word. She is unafraid to approach controversial and sensitive topics and does so with grace and refinement. If I could use one word to describe this book.. it would simply be exceptional.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Trigger: the sexual assault of a child. This was a gut wrenching novel to read. Like many of Jodi Picoult’s novels you will have an internal debate on if justice through the court system is the best route. Though most of us would agree we should never take the law into our hand, we are also not blind to the injustices of our judicial system and corrections system. This powerful novel has twists and turns right up into the last couple pages. I was very engrossed in the plot. I did struggle with N Trigger: the sexual assault of a child. This was a gut wrenching novel to read. Like many of Jodi Picoult’s novels you will have an internal debate on if justice through the court system is the best route. Though most of us would agree we should never take the law into our hand, we are also not blind to the injustices of our judicial system and corrections system. This powerful novel has twists and turns right up into the last couple pages. I was very engrossed in the plot. I did struggle with Nina’s character; because I found her to be a bit obnoxious and arrogant (know it all for sure). However, as a group the characters were intriguing. My quick and simple overall: be prepared that this is an emotionally powerful novel. You’ll be entertained but you will have internal struggles of debate.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this avidly – JP is a good writer – she draws characters well, pitches a story, and does her research. But there is a flaw in this book – Nina, commits murder in order to “protect” her sexually abused son from his abuser, and in doing so severely compounds the trauma suffered by him with the possibility that she may go to prison. Nina goes for the quick fix, the self-serving impassioned unthinking response – but, isn’t maternal instinct actually much stronger, much tougher, than that? I c I read this avidly – JP is a good writer – she draws characters well, pitches a story, and does her research. But there is a flaw in this book – Nina, commits murder in order to “protect” her sexually abused son from his abuser, and in doing so severely compounds the trauma suffered by him with the possibility that she may go to prison. Nina goes for the quick fix, the self-serving impassioned unthinking response – but, isn’t maternal instinct actually much stronger, much tougher, than that? I can remember absolute terror engulfing me one night when faced with the realisation that my young children could be left motherless should anything happen to me. I remember willing myself to ... keep well...stay alive ...above all BE THERE.... So, as I read, and admittedly read somewhat compulsively, Nina became more and more infuriating. She didn't behave like a mother behaves, she is arrogant, she is selfish, she is a know all, and by the end of the book I thoroughly disliked her – in fact come the court room summing up my sympathies lay squarely with the prosecution. At one point Nina reflects that in a “perfect world, love should be the only excuse one needs” ....uhhhh....no... loving is never an excuse for despicable appalling behaviour, loving is never "an excuse" for anything – and now I am getting as judgemental as Nina. That’s probably enough Jodie Picoult for while.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anikka

    I read this entire book in one night - no easy feat at over 400 pages, but it was so engrossing that I couldn't put it down. Picoult does such an incredible amount of research for every one of her books that, even if you don't like the story, you are guarenteed to come away with knowledge that could help you win "Who Wants to be a Millionaire". Reading too many Picoult books can get kind of annoying, as they all follow the same basic formula - even though the end is supposed to surprise you, aft I read this entire book in one night - no easy feat at over 400 pages, but it was so engrossing that I couldn't put it down. Picoult does such an incredible amount of research for every one of her books that, even if you don't like the story, you are guarenteed to come away with knowledge that could help you win "Who Wants to be a Millionaire". Reading too many Picoult books can get kind of annoying, as they all follow the same basic formula - even though the end is supposed to surprise you, after awhile, you know what to expect. Plus, the characters always get away with what they have done. Even though I become attached to the characters and don't want them to go to jail, in the back of my mind, I want one to get put away, just to mix things up!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Books Ring Mah Bell

    reading the contents of my shampoo bottle was more riveting.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Mandly

    I hated this book, but I can't decide if it was the lame plot, overwrought characters or the horrible narrator. I can't believe I stuck with it till the end. I'm not going to waste anymore time on this book except to say that people do not smell like caramel or taste like sugar unless they just ate a donut.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vasia

    classic jodi picoult. troubled family, hot debated issue, extremelly well written metaphors, a law suit and a twist ending . i'm at a point where i've read enough by jodi picoult to expect more or less what is going to happen next, however i still find myself devouring every paperback with her name on i can get my hands on in less then 24-hours time. the woman ,once again, delivers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    Got this in Costa Rica because there was nothing else remotely decent and figured that I'd enjoyed Sister's Keeper enough. However, was let down and just felt that this was hastily written and overly complicated. Plus, explored pretty much the same themes as before and did not do as good a job at exploring the shades of grey. Found myself more annoyed with the mother than anything else and not especially caring about the outcome...next!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Precis: The story follows the reaction of a family to finding out their child has been abused. I found this book quite disturbing, for all the wrong reasons. I mean for reasons probably not intended by the author. First, the US judicial system and it's disadvantages for children victims of abuse, was detailed. It sounds medieval. Modern technology, used to help these children in Britain is not used at all in America. Children have to give evidence like adults. I found myself repelled by the method Precis: The story follows the reaction of a family to finding out their child has been abused. I found this book quite disturbing, for all the wrong reasons. I mean for reasons probably not intended by the author. First, the US judicial system and it's disadvantages for children victims of abuse, was detailed. It sounds medieval. Modern technology, used to help these children in Britain is not used at all in America. Children have to give evidence like adults. I found myself repelled by the method in America, and thankful that I am raising my children elsewhere. Then, the main character, is not at all nice. She is overbearing, rude, short tempered, lacking any patience, lives a double standard (she seems to encourage parents to put their children through the court system by omitting to inform them about the negative effects, when she knows full well she would not put her child through that same system). This unpleasant woman has a fabulous husband who adores her, though he is irritated by her, (which is okay) and a best friend/adorer who thinks she is a goddess, and can do no wrong. Quite simply he is totally unbelievable, and doesn't even seem that necessary to the story. The main character jumps to conclusions about who has abused her child and kills that person. She does this so fast, that she can have no regard for the sanctity of human life at all, and deserves to be flung into jail for the rest of her life. Her son does not deserve that, but he does not deserve such a minging mother anyway. I do not think the woman is a good mum. She isn't there much, she puts him into school when she supposes he is unwell (without trying to discover if he is or not) after dosing him up. In every description of her spending time with him, she is forcing him to do things that suit her needs, and have nothing to do with his, even when he has been abused, and is traumatised. She has a lot of memories of cute times with him, but they seem unreal. How can this monster of a mother have those recollections? Besides, they are the recollections of a stay at home mum, not a full on working mum. There was so little evidence that this guy was the one who had hurt her son that the fact that she killed him was truly amazing. If she had but waited, the DNA report would have come back. She didn't, although later in court, the fact that the DNA testing showed a match was held in her favour as proof that she had reasonably thought the abuser was the man she murdered. This woman is changed very little by having committed murder. She can trade witty comments the same, can give a great summing up the same, it made me want the world to be rid of her. Why kill him in court? She could easily have done it on the night she watched him through his lounge window, why do it in court? The conclusion, where it is revealed that her husband has murdered the true abuser is simply terrifying. It more or less says, if you live in America, and your child is abused, the only recourse you have to justice that will not harm your child is to kill the abuser. And if you get it wrong, you are not a bad person as you were trying to get it right. You should get away with it. I dread the future for that boy, living with two murderers (they are a perfect match after all), denied the chance to participate in justice for his abuser. Thank God he is not real.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heather *Awkward Queen and Unicorn Twin*

    I firmly believe everyone should read what they want. What makes them happy. Be that shameless smut, or bad horror, or rapey bodice rippers. Read it all! I don't care! But I, as a reader, have a guilty secret. I'm a bit of a book snob. This trait emerged without warning when I was recently discussing reading with a friend. She likes to read Jodi Picoult, as does her husband, and I have always sneered at Picoult books because they sound like Lifetime movies. We were trying to find books in common, s I firmly believe everyone should read what they want. What makes them happy. Be that shameless smut, or bad horror, or rapey bodice rippers. Read it all! I don't care! But I, as a reader, have a guilty secret. I'm a bit of a book snob. This trait emerged without warning when I was recently discussing reading with a friend. She likes to read Jodi Picoult, as does her husband, and I have always sneered at Picoult books because they sound like Lifetime movies. We were trying to find books in common, so she gave me three Picoult books to read, which I reluctantly took. (I, in turn, plan on giving her 90s teen romance, so I guess we'll be on equal ground after that.) So, I wasn't wrong about Picoult books. It was exactly like a Lifetime movie. Admittedly, I've only seen one, which was in high school, when I tried one afternoon to see what the big deal about Lifetime movies was. I freaking HATED it. And I hated this book. I've read legal thrillers before, and I've read books dealing with child molestation before. I've read books about motherhood before. Somehow Picoult manages to handle none of these topics well or with any originality. The legal aspect was stale, the molestation didn't move me to sympathy, and the motherhood parts dripped with excessive sentimentality, and I wanted to kill them with fire. Everything sucked. The characters sucked, especially Nina. She was a prosecutor who seemed to have only a casual understanding and respect for the law. She made no logical choices. She was one-dimensional. All the characters were one-dimensional. Everything was so BORING and STUPID. This book was a perfect example of why I never read Picoult. The writing was pretty basic, but with odd moments of attempted poetry. For example, how does someone chewing wintergreen mints give off green sparks? WTF? I also hated the religious aspect. And to top it all off, this was written in first person present tense. ARE YOU KIDDING ME. So now I have to return this book to my friend and figure out how to politely tell her what I thought. I still have the two other Picoult books she gave me, but I definitely need to cleanse my reading palate thoroughly before I pick them up.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michele Zemel

    Excellent thought provoking book by an excellent author. Couldn't put it down. What does it mean to be a good mother? How far would you go in the name of love -- and justice? In the course of her everyday work, career-driven assistant district attorney Nina Frost prosecutes child molesters and works determinedly to ensure that a legal system with too many loopholes keeps these criminals behind bars. But when her own five-year-old son, Nathaniel, is traumatized by a sexual assault, Nina and her husb Excellent thought provoking book by an excellent author. Couldn't put it down. What does it mean to be a good mother? How far would you go in the name of love -- and justice? In the course of her everyday work, career-driven assistant district attorney Nina Frost prosecutes child molesters and works determinedly to ensure that a legal system with too many loopholes keeps these criminals behind bars. But when her own five-year-old son, Nathaniel, is traumatized by a sexual assault, Nina and her husband, Caleb, a quiet and methodical stone mason, are shattered, ripped apart by an enraging sense of helplessness in the face of a futile justice system that Nina knows all too well. In a heartbeat, Nina's absolute truths and convictions are turned upside down, and she hurtles toward a plan to exact her own justice for her son -- no matter the consequence, whatever the sacrifice.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aoibhínn

    Although this may not be one of Jodi Picoult's best novels, nevertheless it is still a good read. Most of Picoult's novel are about extraordinary situations that seem like they've come straight from newspaper headlines, and this one is no different – the sexual abuse of a five year old boy by a person they trusted. Perfect Match is well-written, with multiple narrators so the reader feels like they get to observe all sides of the story. The characters are engaging, intricately flawed and realist Although this may not be one of Jodi Picoult's best novels, nevertheless it is still a good read. Most of Picoult's novel are about extraordinary situations that seem like they've come straight from newspaper headlines, and this one is no different – the sexual abuse of a five year old boy by a person they trusted. Perfect Match is well-written, with multiple narrators so the reader feels like they get to observe all sides of the story. The characters are engaging, intricately flawed and realistic. I don’t want to give any spoilers away but the author does raise some interesting questions in the novel regarding the issue of 'an eye for an eye' and just how far is too far to go when a parent is seeking protection and justice for their child. There were some things in this book that I didn't like. Again I don't want to give away any spoilers, but I didn't like the ending of the novel. I felt that the verdict of the trial should have gone the other way. Four stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Characters: Nina, Caleb, and Nathaniel Frost Patrick Not my favorite JP book. The scenario didn't seem so plausible to me--I believe that sex abuse does happen; however, the scene described seem too contrived. The twist at the end reminded me of a really old Nancy Rosenberg (I think) novel. In her book the mom (also an attorney) murdered the man she believed raped she and her daughter in a home invasion. Later it was revealed that she murdered the wrong person who is a vile individual. In that boo Characters: Nina, Caleb, and Nathaniel Frost Patrick Not my favorite JP book. The scenario didn't seem so plausible to me--I believe that sex abuse does happen; however, the scene described seem too contrived. The twist at the end reminded me of a really old Nancy Rosenberg (I think) novel. In her book the mom (also an attorney) murdered the man she believed raped she and her daughter in a home invasion. Later it was revealed that she murdered the wrong person who is a vile individual. In that book the mom felt horrible due to the murder. In JP books the mom doesn't see overly upset when a wrong occurs that leads to a positive--Perfect Match, Change of Heart, The Tenth Circle. Does that represent human nature???

  14. 5 out of 5

    Petra Willemse

    This was brutal. I had to finish it, but I have no excuse for starting it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I'm embarrassed by my not only enjoying Jodi Picoult in the beginning, but by how I seem to continue enjoying it even when she churns out stuff like this. Perfect Match is contradictory and angsty and ridiculous. Adultery, murder, child abuse... it is so crammed with controversial topics that it runs the whole gauntlet of shocking and comes back round to boring. Which is exactly what the book club readers like, no? A little of nitty gritty to discuss over the tea and biscuits, but not so much th I'm embarrassed by my not only enjoying Jodi Picoult in the beginning, but by how I seem to continue enjoying it even when she churns out stuff like this. Perfect Match is contradictory and angsty and ridiculous. Adultery, murder, child abuse... it is so crammed with controversial topics that it runs the whole gauntlet of shocking and comes back round to boring. Which is exactly what the book club readers like, no? A little of nitty gritty to discuss over the tea and biscuits, but not so much that it's distasteful. Believe me, I'm not saying "Give me distasteful!" But I am saying "Stop giving me trite!" The books hinges on a coincidence that would barely ever ever happen in real life, but that's not what bothered me. (Fair play to Picoult for thinking of it.) What really riled me is this: (view spoiler)[ that the heroine (ha! heroine!) gets away with the murder - even though it is committed in front of a couple of hundred of people in a court of law. I mean, seriously? She gets away with it. Will any of Jodi Picoult's beloved and annoying creations ever be put behind bars? I bloody well hope so. (hide spoiler)] I gave this 2.5 stars but I know it won't put me off reading her others - if there are more to read. Blimey, have I read them all yet? I can't seem to help it: she is mindlessly addictive.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Britta

    "When we are struck at without a reason, we should strike back again very hard; I am sure we should - so hard as to teach the person who struck us never to do it again." ~Charlotte Bronte "[He] puts his big hands on my shoulders. I fell in love with [him] because of those hands, which can touch me as if I am a soap bubble certain to burst, yet are powerful enough to hold me together when I am in danger of falling to pieces." "You are only as invincible as your smallest weakness, and those are tiny "When we are struck at without a reason, we should strike back again very hard; I am sure we should - so hard as to teach the person who struck us never to do it again." ~Charlotte Bronte "[He] puts his big hands on my shoulders. I fell in love with [him] because of those hands, which can touch me as if I am a soap bubble certain to burst, yet are powerful enough to hold me together when I am in danger of falling to pieces." "You are only as invincible as your smallest weakness, and those are tiny indeed - the length of a sleeping baby's eyelash, the span of a child's hand. Life turns on a dime, and - it turns out - so does one's conscience." "Sometimes when you pick up your child you can feel the map of your own bones beneath your hands, or smell the scent of your skin in the nape of his neck. This is the most ebtraordinary thing about motherhood - finding a piece of yourself seperate and apart that all the same you could not live without." "Justification is a remarkable thing - takes all those solid lines and blurs them, so that honor becomes as supple as a willow, and ethics burst like soap bubbles." "It's not what you do with a child that brings you together... it is the fact that you are lucky enough to do it at all."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jen from Quebec :0)

    Dang-- until the last 50 pages or so, this book was going to get a higher star rating. However, the ending was a bit too much of a 'picture perfect super happy' ending for my tastes; ESPECIALLY considering that the book deals with such negative topics! (sexual abuse, murder, rape, the flaws in the legal system, etc). I feel that the author took the easy way out + tried to tie things up into a pretty bow, and (by her own admission in the Author's Q+A section at the back of the book) actually went Dang-- until the last 50 pages or so, this book was going to get a higher star rating. However, the ending was a bit too much of a 'picture perfect super happy' ending for my tastes; ESPECIALLY considering that the book deals with such negative topics! (sexual abuse, murder, rape, the flaws in the legal system, etc). I feel that the author took the easy way out + tried to tie things up into a pretty bow, and (by her own admission in the Author's Q+A section at the back of the book) actually went out of her way to RESEARCH LOOPHOLES in the state laws of her Maine setting in order for everything to end well. Ugh. Disappointing. For the majority of the book, Jodi Picoult was quite brave in her writing, not shying away from topics that are not tackled very often in contemporary 'chick lit'. For example, she shows how sexually abused children are often denied justice in the USA, as her District Attorney main character, Nina, had only 7 convictions for every 60 cases. Children with learning disabilities are hit hardest, as they are often unable to be 'found competent to stand witness at trial'. To have a book use 450 pages to show that the legal system is flawed for helpless victims only to throw away that good writing for 50 pages of tripe at the end really rather ruined the entire novel for me. There are other thoughts that I have, as this is the 1st Jodi Picoult that I've read, but at the moment my emotions are hindering my writing! Bummer. --Jen from Quebec :0(

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I don't even know where to start on how terrible this book was. If I could give negative stars I would. It's laughable, the events that take place in the courtroom would never be allowed. I Could not stand any of the characters, especially the main femal character. I would actually be reading and have to stop and say outloud to myself "I can't believe how BAD this book is". Come on the ending, I would of enjoyed the book much more if her husband would of left her and she would of been sentenced I don't even know where to start on how terrible this book was. If I could give negative stars I would. It's laughable, the events that take place in the courtroom would never be allowed. I Could not stand any of the characters, especially the main femal character. I would actually be reading and have to stop and say outloud to myself "I can't believe how BAD this book is". Come on the ending, I would of enjoyed the book much more if her husband would of left her and she would of been sentenced to 20 years in prison that she had to serve. And then the big twist in the end, what her husband did to the other priest! (laughable)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Where do I start with this atrocious book? First of all, the main character Nina was a ridiculous c—t. Sorry, but it’s true. After finding out that her son is molested she decides to shoot the accused priest at the arraignment. How stupid is that? Even the angriest of parents wouldn’t do such a thing. If your child is molested your primary focus should be supporting and seeking help for your child. Not ending up in jail thereby reducing your son’s support system. And then… oopsie!! She killed the Where do I start with this atrocious book? First of all, the main character Nina was a ridiculous c—t. Sorry, but it’s true. After finding out that her son is molested she decides to shoot the accused priest at the arraignment. How stupid is that? Even the angriest of parents wouldn’t do such a thing. If your child is molested your primary focus should be supporting and seeking help for your child. Not ending up in jail thereby reducing your son’s support system. And then… oopsie!! She killed the wrong guy! So now she is going on trial for murder. And then she decides to have an affair with the police officer (because Jodi always has to cram a contrived romantic subplot in every one of her novels). The author clearly has an agenda against the husband and wants us to feel like Nina’s affair is justified. Except she never gives us a good reason as to why we shouldn’t like her husband besides the fact that he is a little distant. Additionally, the 5 year old kid was completely unrealistic in the way that he talked. He used elaborate metaphors and SAT words that no five year old kid would ever use. The most ludicrous part of the book was the ending. (view spoiler)[She gets away with it because of the “love of her kid” or some BS like that. Ridiculous! No one in real life would get away with that. Why does the author completely ignore the fact that she SHOT AND KILLED AN INNOCENT MAN! What about HIS family and friends who are mourning their loved one that was wrongfully accused of molestation and then killed? Picoult was trying to make a moral dilemma out of something that was pretty straightforward. (hide spoiler)] And THEN the next stupid twist reveals that (view spoiler)[the husband killed the REAL priest. Oh great! Now the kid has two murderous parents! Yipee! (hide spoiler)] This was the most ridiculous, pile of garbage I have ever had the misfortune of reading and I wouldn’t recommend this drivel to my worst enemy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Pickering

    My all time favorite ofJodi Picoult's books. It took me a long time to open a JP book simply because the subject matter she chooses makes me squirmy. I felt the same way about this one. Most of us don't want to read a book about such an uncomfortable subject. The molestation is only a small part of the book, it is just the catalyst. The story grabs you within the first few chapters and refuses to let go. JP takes us a roller coaster of emotions and twists of events that continue until the end. O My all time favorite ofJodi Picoult's books. It took me a long time to open a JP book simply because the subject matter she chooses makes me squirmy. I felt the same way about this one. Most of us don't want to read a book about such an uncomfortable subject. The molestation is only a small part of the book, it is just the catalyst. The story grabs you within the first few chapters and refuses to let go. JP takes us a roller coaster of emotions and twists of events that continue until the end. One of the most surprising things about this book is the fact that I liked it so much while not liking the main character. I have heard this from friends of mine too. I have loaned it to several friends and they have loved it and I have always received the same comment "I couldn't put it down. It was just so good!" I have only loaned it to women so far so I can't give a man's perspective. You won't waste your money on this one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    If you've read one of Jodi Picoult's book then you've read "Perfect Match". My friend gave me this book and its been staring at me for the last three months. I decided to give the book a read and I don't know how I made it to the end. It was such a classic Picoult read, filled with adultery, messy family drama, moral questions... everything you could possibly think of was in this book. For me, the book felt over-written and just TOO much. I mean, just how many topics can we cover in 450 pages? Re If you've read one of Jodi Picoult's book then you've read "Perfect Match". My friend gave me this book and its been staring at me for the last three months. I decided to give the book a read and I don't know how I made it to the end. It was such a classic Picoult read, filled with adultery, messy family drama, moral questions... everything you could possibly think of was in this book. For me, the book felt over-written and just TOO much. I mean, just how many topics can we cover in 450 pages? Regardless, its clear that you either love this book or detest it. I think I was more annoyed.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This book was well written and page-turning with a masterful plot. Picoult developed each character with suspense. However I was irritated with the main character, Nina...she was selfish and I often wanted to kick her. In this book I admired Attorney Fisher Carrington who seemed to be the only one exemplifying healthy relationships. He was a servant and savior. I wanted to give all the others therapy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    Jodi Picoult is one of my all time favorite authors. I anxiously await her new books each year. It has been awhile since I read Perfect Match but it is a book that definitely stays with you. Painful to read at times but well written and difficult to put down once you start. You can tell that as usual Jodi Picoult has done her research. As with quite a few of her books dealing with a tough subject can make for some emotional moments for sure. Recommended

  24. 4 out of 5

    Neelam Babul

    A gut-wrenching story. Like many of Jodi Picoult’s novels, you will ponder over whether justice through the court system is the best route or should one take matters into their own hands considering the gravity of the offense. Though most of us would agree we should let the law take its course, we are also aware of the loopholes and intricacies of the law and of our judicial system. The story revolved around Nina, a defense attorney who handles legal cases involving child sexual abuse. Her world A gut-wrenching story. Like many of Jodi Picoult’s novels, you will ponder over whether justice through the court system is the best route or should one take matters into their own hands considering the gravity of the offense. Though most of us would agree we should let the law take its course, we are also aware of the loopholes and intricacies of the law and of our judicial system. The story revolved around Nina, a defense attorney who handles legal cases involving child sexual abuse. Her world is turned upside down when her own son is a victim of abuse and she has to fight for justice for her son. An emotional and heart-wrenching story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Huether

    How far would a mother go to protect her child. Nina Frost, an Assistant District attorney goes beyond the justice system to avenge her son's sexual preditor. No one could see this coming. There are more twists and turns in the story, making it unforgettable. Jodi Picoult is one of my favorite authors.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    What a story! Picoult is my favorite author and all of her books seem to deal with some sort of moral or social dilemma. This was a superb drama. One that tugs at the heart of every parent out there. Who hasn't imagined being a vigilante of justice in the event that your child was victimized? The book was written in first person from many of the characters points of view. At first, when I was just getting to know and understand the characters, this was a little difficult to follow. I quickly over What a story! Picoult is my favorite author and all of her books seem to deal with some sort of moral or social dilemma. This was a superb drama. One that tugs at the heart of every parent out there. Who hasn't imagined being a vigilante of justice in the event that your child was victimized? The book was written in first person from many of the characters points of view. At first, when I was just getting to know and understand the characters, this was a little difficult to follow. I quickly overcame that problem and was sucked into the heart of this story. The characters were written with such depth; they really came to life for me as a reader. I both cried with them and rejoiced with them while I was reading. There was a huge plot twist about 2/3 of the way through the story that actually made me gasp out loud! And the ending, while a little short on explanation, left me very satisfied with the outcome of everyone. I read some of the other reviews out there on Goodreads and I was surprised to see that some people mentioned reading this book in one sitting. It was too intense of a read for me to be able to do that. Another excellent book by Jodi Picoult. This is why she is my favoite author.....

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marti Dahlquist

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There was too much self justification in all of the characters for me to like this book. The main character barely missed a beat when it turns out she murdered the wrong person. She convinces her son that people who molest young boys are "bad" but it fails to register in her head that people who murder are also bad. I'd like to know that all professionals take their job seriously and treat each case as if it happened to a family member. The fact that her son was too special to endure what she had There was too much self justification in all of the characters for me to like this book. The main character barely missed a beat when it turns out she murdered the wrong person. She convinces her son that people who molest young boys are "bad" but it fails to register in her head that people who murder are also bad. I'd like to know that all professionals take their job seriously and treat each case as if it happened to a family member. The fact that her son was too special to endure what she had put other children through was obnoxious. The fact that every person involved with her trial bent over backwards to get her off was unsettling. It didn't make me want to ever have to rely on the legal system because apparently it is only on your side when you work for it. I realize this is fiction, but the story was just too terrible to enjoy. It was also quite obvious that the husband had something to do with the murder of the real molester. The fact that both he and the cat turned up dead at the same time led you to believe someone in the story did it. I normally enjoy Jodi Picoult, but not this one.....

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    This is my absolute favourite Jodi Picoult book. Although most people opt for 'My Sisters Keeper' and I don't blame them because that is amazing, I just think this book is so exciting- to a point where I read it in one sitting. Although many of Jodi's books have a 'shock' factor somewhere, that's partly why I love her writing, this was twist and turns all of the way through. The characters were so well developed and you could completely understand even when they behaved so erratically. It's a tr This is my absolute favourite Jodi Picoult book. Although most people opt for 'My Sisters Keeper' and I don't blame them because that is amazing, I just think this book is so exciting- to a point where I read it in one sitting. Although many of Jodi's books have a 'shock' factor somewhere, that's partly why I love her writing, this was twist and turns all of the way through. The characters were so well developed and you could completely understand even when they behaved so erratically. It's a truly great book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    This was yet another fantastic read from Jodi Picoult. I am slowly making my way through the books I haven’t read by her and I got a whole bunch from the library that included Perfect Match. What I love about Jodi’s books is that she really makes you care about her characters - what Nina does is absolutely wrong, but her reasons for doing it are absolutely sound. I wasn’t against her at all - you have to do what you have to do for your family. It obviously wasn’t all plain sailing, with other thi This was yet another fantastic read from Jodi Picoult. I am slowly making my way through the books I haven’t read by her and I got a whole bunch from the library that included Perfect Match. What I love about Jodi’s books is that she really makes you care about her characters - what Nina does is absolutely wrong, but her reasons for doing it are absolutely sound. I wasn’t against her at all - you have to do what you have to do for your family. It obviously wasn’t all plain sailing, with other things coming out, but I was on Nina’s side the whole damn time. It is one of my biggest frustrations that the court system in any country (particularly in the UK, though) cannot adequately punish somebody for a crime. Sexual abuse should be a life sentence without parole and I don’t care who that offends. Ditto murder and manslaughter and people who kill other people by accident (car accidents etc). So I felt a sense of justice by what Nina did, whether it was right or wrong. This was yet another brilliant, gripping read and I’m very excited to dive into another one of her backlist titles.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sol Florano

    Seamlessly, Jodi Picoult has pulled me out of my too-long reader's block and back into the track of hard-hitting emotions, too-often hushed issues, and one hell of a ride in Perfect Match. Nina Frost is a prosecutor in Maine who tries to balance being a mother to her five year old son, Nathaniel, and a lawyer seeking justice to help ease the pain of molested children. But her world tilts precariously on its edge when they find out that their sweet little boy was a victim of the crime she so despe Seamlessly, Jodi Picoult has pulled me out of my too-long reader's block and back into the track of hard-hitting emotions, too-often hushed issues, and one hell of a ride in Perfect Match. Nina Frost is a prosecutor in Maine who tries to balance being a mother to her five year old son, Nathaniel, and a lawyer seeking justice to help ease the pain of molested children. But her world tilts precariously on its edge when they find out that their sweet little boy was a victim of the crime she so desperately works to eradicate. Quite the opposite of her husband's, Caleb's, stonework job, they find that the lives they've built are slowly crumbling around the trauma this might bring to the balance they've managed to form in their routine. The Frosts become one of those families raising their fists whilst hiding their faces for justice, putting their trust in the system Nina knows too well. She knows it will take years before the perpetrator, if Nathaniel ever chooses to name, will be sent to jail for an amount of time unequal to the amount of trauma and hurt he has managed to wedge in their family. So, when her son finally says a name, when they find his soiled underpants with dried semen and matched it to a man she thought they could trust, she took the matters into her own hands and did what every parent was wont to do: she protected her child the way she thought best. But with this action came a price she wasn't ready to face. The man she killed for her child's safety was innocent. What transpires next is a story of love so strong it changes who we are at the core. I am not ashamed to admit that this story has brought me to tears more times than any of hers did at first read. Perfect Match has this resounding quality to it that stays with the reader, long after s/he has closed the book and left the Frost to live with that ending. I think one of the main reasons why this novel hit me so hard is that I believe any crime committed against a child can never be forgiven, especially abuse. To take one's innocence, to take a child's purity, to change a kid's awe-struck wonder to fear-filled and untrusting gazes, is the worst thing anyone can do. It taints someone so pure, so trusting and malleable, and convinces them that it was their fault, that they were wrong, that everyone would think they were bad. How can anyone look into a child's eyes and want to hurt them and traumatize them? I have felt for Nina from the beginning. She knew the odds of obtaining justice: she knew the loops of the bowels of the system. She knew it too well that she knew it never works. But what she decided to do wasn't because she was a prosecutor. She was a mother, an instinctive role that commits to the protection of her child, no matter the consequence. She never wants her child, twice rendered mute by this experience, to feel that again, to relive all those moments over and over. She just wants everything to go back the way things were; before this incident swallowed them whole like a black hole and sucked everything into it. She just wanted it to stop. And stop it she did. She was prepared to face the consequences of what she'd done. After seeing so many people stand in the shoes she's filling now, she knew she had a way out. But when the staggering truth falls on her shoulders and the weight of the burden makes her question, not only her sanity but also, her actions, things take an interesting, albeit a grim, turn. I cannot even begin to fathom the way Nina felt. Or any of the characters did. To watch the foundation of everything just turn to dust is certainly not easy. But shots had been fired and there are consequences to face, just not the ones they were willing to face. As I was reading awhile ago, I had to stop when I reached the part when Nina took matters into her own hands. I sympathized with her and understood her actions after spending so much time watching, through a mother's eyes, the changes that has befallen her lovely child. I was in a moral dilemma, one I never thought I'd face before, just like she probably didn't, too. But it was there, staring at me with its ugly face. "Would I do what she had done?" And the answer is, yes. Without question, without hesitation. As parents, humans have instincts to protect and preserve their offsprings. And crudely, that's what Nina did. It may not serve as an excuse for her actions but it explained it pretty well. And I guess, that's where Picoult draws her writing prowess from. She takes these questions we try so hard not to think about and presses them onto us from all sides, forcing us to swallow the bitter truth that the world isn't black and white. We do not let ourselves think these thoughts, afraid of what they'd reveal about us, but when we do let these permeate through us, we'd know we'd be reduced to our instincts, to make the source of pain stop forever. I cannot bear to think the fate that has befallen Nathaniel would happen to anyone I love. But the truth is, they happen all around me, whether I know it or not. And try as I might to protect those I love, there exists that statistical probability that it might happen to one of them. Even if I shelter them to the best I could. Even if I teach them how to protect themselves. And if it happens, I could not tell you I would do what she did. I don't know if I have the guts. But, at the same time, I could not tell you I wouldn't do what she did. I don't know if I have the power to stop myself. Ms. Picoult writes with a clarity that shakes self-doubt in place of self-realization. Although the ending shocked me, a greater part of me was glad it ended the way it did. Maybe, just maybe, some families got their temporary happily-ever afters.

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