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Electroboy: A Memoir of Mania

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Electroboy is an emotionally frenzied memoir that reveals with kaleidoscopic intensity the terrifying world of manic depression. For years Andy Behrman hid his raging mania behind a larger-than-life personality. He sought a high wherever he could find one and changed jobs the way some people change outfits: filmmaker, PR agent, art dealer, stripper-whatever made him feel l Electroboy is an emotionally frenzied memoir that reveals with kaleidoscopic intensity the terrifying world of manic depression. For years Andy Behrman hid his raging mania behind a larger-than-life personality. He sought a high wherever he could find one and changed jobs the way some people change outfits: filmmaker, PR agent, art dealer, stripper-whatever made him feel like a cartoon character, invincible and bright. Misdiagnosed by psychiatrists and psychotherapists for years, his condition exacted a terrible price: out-of-control euphoric highs and tornadolike rages of depression that put his life in jeopardy. Ignoring his crescendoing illness, Behrman struggled to keep up appearances, clinging to the golden-boy image he had cultivated in his youth. But when he turned to art forgery, he found himself the subject of a scandal lapped up by the New York media, then incarcerated, then under house arrest. And for the first time the golden boy didn’t have a ready escape hatch from his unraveling life. Ingesting handfuls of antidepressants and tranquilizers and feeling his mind lose traction, he opted for the last resort: electroshock therapy. At once hilarious and harrowing, Electroboy paints a mesmerizing portrait of a man held hostage by his in-satiable desire to consume. Along the way, it shows us the New York that never sleeps: a world of strip clubs, after-hours dives, and twenty-four-hour coffee shops, whose cheap seductions offer comfort to the city’s lonely souls. This unforgettable memoir is a unique contribution to the literature of mental illness and introduces a writer whose energy may well keep you up all night. From the Hardcover edition.


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Electroboy is an emotionally frenzied memoir that reveals with kaleidoscopic intensity the terrifying world of manic depression. For years Andy Behrman hid his raging mania behind a larger-than-life personality. He sought a high wherever he could find one and changed jobs the way some people change outfits: filmmaker, PR agent, art dealer, stripper-whatever made him feel l Electroboy is an emotionally frenzied memoir that reveals with kaleidoscopic intensity the terrifying world of manic depression. For years Andy Behrman hid his raging mania behind a larger-than-life personality. He sought a high wherever he could find one and changed jobs the way some people change outfits: filmmaker, PR agent, art dealer, stripper-whatever made him feel like a cartoon character, invincible and bright. Misdiagnosed by psychiatrists and psychotherapists for years, his condition exacted a terrible price: out-of-control euphoric highs and tornadolike rages of depression that put his life in jeopardy. Ignoring his crescendoing illness, Behrman struggled to keep up appearances, clinging to the golden-boy image he had cultivated in his youth. But when he turned to art forgery, he found himself the subject of a scandal lapped up by the New York media, then incarcerated, then under house arrest. And for the first time the golden boy didn’t have a ready escape hatch from his unraveling life. Ingesting handfuls of antidepressants and tranquilizers and feeling his mind lose traction, he opted for the last resort: electroshock therapy. At once hilarious and harrowing, Electroboy paints a mesmerizing portrait of a man held hostage by his in-satiable desire to consume. Along the way, it shows us the New York that never sleeps: a world of strip clubs, after-hours dives, and twenty-four-hour coffee shops, whose cheap seductions offer comfort to the city’s lonely souls. This unforgettable memoir is a unique contribution to the literature of mental illness and introduces a writer whose energy may well keep you up all night. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for Electroboy: A Memoir of Mania

  1. 4 out of 5

    Oriana

    I wrote a really insensitive review of this a couple years ago—you can see in the comments some people reacting to my bone-headed-ness with grace and sensitivity, just the opposite of the way I reacted to this book & its author. I feel shitty about it, so I'm redoing this review. Sorry if that's a bit revisionist-history of me. I also want to say that I don't have any kind of psych background, and little context to understand manic personality disorder. To be completely honest, I think my lon I wrote a really insensitive review of this a couple years ago—you can see in the comments some people reacting to my bone-headed-ness with grace and sensitivity, just the opposite of the way I reacted to this book & its author. I feel shitty about it, so I'm redoing this review. Sorry if that's a bit revisionist-history of me. I also want to say that I don't have any kind of psych background, and little context to understand manic personality disorder. To be completely honest, I think my longtime partner may have tendency toward some kind of mania, or bipolar, or something, and I happened to find this book when he was in sort of a tough place. Which is a roundabout way of saying that my expectation was that this would be a memoir of acting out / diagnosis / recovery, something I could maybe learn from, that could shed a bit of light on something I was adjacently experiencing and help me gain some clarity about it. It did not do that at all. Electroboy is not a book about diagnosing and dealing with the reality of manic-depressive disorder. It's a memoir of a person who runs as fast and far away from sanity and salvation as he possibly can, for a really long time. Andy Behrman comes across as a spoiled rich kid from the get. He has a crazy amount of sex and does an astounding amount of drugs. His morality is dubious and extremely fluid. He hurts all the people around him, with varying degrees of intent and satisfaction. He is incredibly narcissistic. He is way, way, way out of control, and is virtually unchecked for most of his life. (Where were his parents? Where were his friends? Why was no one paying attention to this volatile, self-destructive person?) Here are some things Andy does. He stays up for days, answering classified ads and going to strangers' homes to snort coke and have orgies. He runs and works at various PR agencies—very successfully, in fact—launching and enhancing the careers of a while slew of awful people. He also works as a go-go boy and sometimes prostitute. He makes and drops friends at a, well, manic pace, just as quickly as he meets and discards therapists and medications. And even when he's on a cocktail of a dozen different different meds, he still "gets restless" and goes out to take huge amounts of drugs and sleep with hookers. I think the point was that the reader would feel bad for him, because the mania is driving him or whatever, but he was just so unapologetic, so boastful, so preening and proud. He never really faced what he was doing, never took responsibility for all the damage he'd wrought, for all the people he'd hurt. It was all very hard to stomach, and very hard to enjoy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Liz Wright

    Sometimes, being a therapist, you forget what real true mania looks like because you don’t get to see it too often. Granted, you see some hypomania, but you don’t see the graphicness of true mania: $20,000 Barney’s shopping sprees, prostitution, 3 a.m. random travel to wherever, or lying, cheating, and stealing without fear of getting caught. Reading this book was like watching a horrible TV special on fast-forward (horrible because it made you feel uncomfortable for Behrman and also for the peo Sometimes, being a therapist, you forget what real true mania looks like because you don’t get to see it too often. Granted, you see some hypomania, but you don’t see the graphicness of true mania: $20,000 Barney’s shopping sprees, prostitution, 3 a.m. random travel to wherever, or lying, cheating, and stealing without fear of getting caught. Reading this book was like watching a horrible TV special on fast-forward (horrible because it made you feel uncomfortable for Behrman and also for the people he knew, not because it was written poorly). I read paragraphs out loud to other therapists and they told me to stop because they couldn’t follow what he was talking about. I sat and shook my head, thinking, “You did WHAT?” I definitely suggest this book to anyone who is interested in knowing what a full-blown manic episode looks like and all the possible ways that the psychiatric community can deal with it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Daniels

    One of my absolute favorite books. Fast-paced and highly entertaining. I read it for the second time this year.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Charles Michael Fischer

    "Electroboy" is one of the better Bipolar memoirs I've read. I'd rank it up there with Marya Hornbacher's "Madness." I love the prose's frenetic pace that accurately captures mania: the racing/crowded thoughts, the embers inside your overstimulated brain, the compulsiveness and impulsiveness, the agitation, sleeplessness, etc. Behrman trusts readers to pick up on the style's expression of theme; as another reviewer wrote, Behrman "shows" mania. If you want mere information, try Google or a broch "Electroboy" is one of the better Bipolar memoirs I've read. I'd rank it up there with Marya Hornbacher's "Madness." I love the prose's frenetic pace that accurately captures mania: the racing/crowded thoughts, the embers inside your overstimulated brain, the compulsiveness and impulsiveness, the agitation, sleeplessness, etc. Behrman trusts readers to pick up on the style's expression of theme; as another reviewer wrote, Behrman "shows" mania. If you want mere information, try Google or a brochure, not a memoir. It goes without saying that you shouldn't expect a creative memoir to introduce you to the disease. Anyway, Behrman has a story to tell, unlike many Bipolar memoirs that boringly milk the premise ("I'm Bipolar"--yawn; who cares). That might sound harsh, but I'm Bipolar and more trees don't need to die for these repetitive books to flood the market, books that simply ride the premise. I also wasn't bothered by Behrman's privilege. He's upfront about it from jump, self-deprecating, and the moments of braggadocio are so clearly (at least to me) showing grandiosity (a symptom of high-octane mania) and posturing. Again, it's not his job to fill in those gaps for you and I appreciate his willingness to allow me, the reader, to participate in the reading of the text without dictating in sappy, dishonest self-help rhetoric.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Schmenny

    A memoir by one of those 80's yuppie schmucks. This one is afflicted with manic depression, emphasis on the manic part, so the more interesting parts of the book deal with his crazy, obsessive, reckless, scamming, over-sexed, money-burning frenzies. Oh, and he was involved in a major international art fraud case. I didn't like him, his writing style, or aspects of the book, but it was still interesting, and it reminded me of some of my manic friends, except on a grander, more screwed up scale. I c A memoir by one of those 80's yuppie schmucks. This one is afflicted with manic depression, emphasis on the manic part, so the more interesting parts of the book deal with his crazy, obsessive, reckless, scamming, over-sexed, money-burning frenzies. Oh, and he was involved in a major international art fraud case. I didn't like him, his writing style, or aspects of the book, but it was still interesting, and it reminded me of some of my manic friends, except on a grander, more screwed up scale. I checked out his website and he's now offering services advising other bipolar people. For $250 an hour, which made me think he's still a con man.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karen Tyrrell

    Electroboy: A Memoir of Mania by Andy Behrman hooked me in from the very start with his childhood obsessions, his manic episodes and shocking behaviour. One minute I was cringing, the next totally engaged with his art forging escapades and electro-shock therapy. Always emphathising with Andy Behrman the person, praying that he would somehow Recover and lead a normal life. Electroboy, the MOVIE comes out soon.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Micaela

    Omg. This was a total piece of garbage. I am so sick and tired of memoirs that have no depth! This was just a recounting of his "awesome times" and how much money he made and how he barely even was punished for art fraud. Oh, and he had electroshock therapy. He kinda threw that in there as a sidenote. AWFUL!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I forgot about this one, red it years ago. But on my quest to find a new "crazy" book, I remembered this little gem! I thoroughly enjoyed it, perhaps because of my own identification with a lot of it... I think you'd have to really WANT to read about mental illness (and how entertaining it is) to enjoy it...

  9. 5 out of 5

    William

    This is great. Andy really did a great job structuring his novel. He gets the right amount and type of details in at the right time. You follow both the progression of his disease, but also the progression of the major points in his life--all dictated by his disease. It's a disease I share, so this book definitely has an extra appeal to me and other sufferers of mental illness. I think this is a great novel for friends and family of people with bipolar disorder to read. It's a well paced, and we This is great. Andy really did a great job structuring his novel. He gets the right amount and type of details in at the right time. You follow both the progression of his disease, but also the progression of the major points in his life--all dictated by his disease. It's a disease I share, so this book definitely has an extra appeal to me and other sufferers of mental illness. I think this is a great novel for friends and family of people with bipolar disorder to read. It's a well paced, and well organized chronicle of a peaking disorder. It's never over the top. It's very real. I imagine this is how Andy talks when he's at his therapist. I recognize much of the storytelling as the ways I tell my story to my therapist. First ten or fifteen pages in I wasn't so impressed, but as I kept reading and got to know Andy I was really digging it. I think what makes this nonfiction work so compatible with my story-telling tastes is that the tone of the writing isn't what's most important. Andy has a great way of keeping the content at the forefront of importance, and leaving stylistics to exist as unseen functions. I definitely recommend this to anyone interested in bipolar disorder. I might even lend it to my mom. There's some strange stuff in there, some parts about Andy's sexual life--his bipolar and strange sexual life--but I think all in all it's a book that wouldn't get your mother too worried about you. Andy touches upon all the familiar themes of living with mental illness. Great job, Andy. Really, great job!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    This is a weird book. It claims to be a memoir about living with manic depression/mania, but it's not very memoir-like at all, and the day-to-day life described doesn't sound a whole lot like bipolar depression either. The weirdest thing is the way it's written. Even though the guy is doing some really high-stakes and sometimes outrageous stuff and staying up for days at a time, the events are told in a sort of monotone, and the excitement of what's going on isn't really captured at all. It's so This is a weird book. It claims to be a memoir about living with manic depression/mania, but it's not very memoir-like at all, and the day-to-day life described doesn't sound a whole lot like bipolar depression either. The weirdest thing is the way it's written. Even though the guy is doing some really high-stakes and sometimes outrageous stuff and staying up for days at a time, the events are told in a sort of monotone, and the excitement of what's going on isn't really captured at all. It's sort of like a long list of zany and irresponsible stuff that happened. But despite the stylistic oddity, I can't put it down, and I can't put a finger on why. Some of what the guy's doing is interesting - the stuff about being an art dealer is what I find most interesting. The adventures in the porn and prostitution industries are kind of interesting as well, in that train-wreck kind of way. The guy is flying back and forth to different areas of the U.S., Europe, Asia, all over the place every few days, but the travel doesn't sound glamorous at all - you get no sense of scenery or time or anything, really. It comes across more like a record than a glimpse into the guy's soul.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sprin

    I've heard about this memoir for years, and finally read it. I like to read memoirs of people with mental illnesses. It was interesting enough to get through and it had many colorful moments. But as I started reading it, I realized something: It seems like all of the people with mental illnesses who write memoirs always come from very privileged backgrounds. Essentially, they are rich kids who go to ivy league colleges. I've never read a memoir of a person with mental illness who grew up poor. I I've heard about this memoir for years, and finally read it. I like to read memoirs of people with mental illnesses. It was interesting enough to get through and it had many colorful moments. But as I started reading it, I realized something: It seems like all of the people with mental illnesses who write memoirs always come from very privileged backgrounds. Essentially, they are rich kids who go to ivy league colleges. I've never read a memoir of a person with mental illness who grew up poor. It seems like a crazy person needs to come from a rich family in order to make anything of themselves. Andy Behrman is indeed intelligent, but he's a con-man. It's hard to relate to him. All in all, it made for an entertaining read. Although I'd like to read a memoir from a different economic perspective, if I could find one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mikelkpoet

    Electro Boy Review By Mikel K It’s called, “Electro Boy, a memoir of mania”, and a wild manic roller coaster of a book it is once the author leaves home and gets out on his own and becomes a drug ingesting sex fiend selling art that is not his to sell. Having fucked my life up quite a bit as a dual diagnosed bipolar alcoholic who can’t stay off a pot pipe if there is pot around, I found myself ewwwing and awinng at Andy’s adventures and the amount of medication that they finally put him on, and th Electro Boy Review By Mikel K It’s called, “Electro Boy, a memoir of mania”, and a wild manic roller coaster of a book it is once the author leaves home and gets out on his own and becomes a drug ingesting sex fiend selling art that is not his to sell. Having fucked my life up quite a bit as a dual diagnosed bipolar alcoholic who can’t stay off a pot pipe if there is pot around, I found myself ewwwing and awinng at Andy’s adventures and the amount of medication that they finally put him on, and the number of electroshock treatments that he goes through to stabilize him, if they indeed did stabilize him which I couldn’t fully tell by book’s end. I hope that Mr. Behrman’s worst days are behind him and I commend him for having the big brass balls to write such a tell all book. Other untreated bipolar human beings may read it, relate and seek help.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Juli Kinrich

    I'm generally not a fan of paragraphs that run on for a page or more, but in Behrman's case, it makes sense, serving to underscore this masterful account of his maniacal, overcharged life--both the internal one that had him hallucinating tattoos erupting on his skin and the external one that sent him jetting around the globe, fistfuls of cash in hand. powerful, stunning memoir. Behrman is jaw-droppingly brutal in his self-exposure. It takes real guts to hang your sins and shortcomings out on the I'm generally not a fan of paragraphs that run on for a page or more, but in Behrman's case, it makes sense, serving to underscore this masterful account of his maniacal, overcharged life--both the internal one that had him hallucinating tattoos erupting on his skin and the external one that sent him jetting around the globe, fistfuls of cash in hand. powerful, stunning memoir. Behrman is jaw-droppingly brutal in his self-exposure. It takes real guts to hang your sins and shortcomings out on the line for all to see. I love that he now works to take away the taboo of talking publicly about mental health. Here's hoping there's a second memoir in his future. I'd buy it in a heartbeat!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Littrell

    The life and times of an extremophile The kind of manic self-indulgence and self-escape that Andy Behrman indulges in on a daily basis is almost beyond description, but he's a pretty good writer and gives it a shot here in a memoir sure to offend the burghers and to titillate and impress the fast lane crowd. For the first half of the book he goes from ups to upper ups and never seems to come down; or at least when he does come down it is a short-lived, relatively unremarkable period that he skips The life and times of an extremophile The kind of manic self-indulgence and self-escape that Andy Behrman indulges in on a daily basis is almost beyond description, but he's a pretty good writer and gives it a shot here in a memoir sure to offend the burghers and to titillate and impress the fast lane crowd. For the first half of the book he goes from ups to upper ups and never seems to come down; or at least when he does come down it is a short-lived, relatively unremarkable period that he skips over. Most of the time he is frantically busy buying and selling, hustling and chasing: dope, women, men, food, drink, clothes, airplanes, money, money and money. At one point he is making $20,000 a month doing PR for clients and hustling art work. He spends the money as fast as he makes it; actually sometimes he spends it faster than he makes it. His adventures include being a male escort, raising money for a film he never makes, stealing his sister's clients, developing his own publicity company, going from go-fer to international broker of fine art, multi-sexual sex gigs, cocaine, snorted and smoked, alcohol, marijuana, and pills, legal and illegal. If it's to be done, Andy-boy is the man to do it, and now. He can work sixteen-hour days weeks on end and still find time to roam the streets at three a.m. looking for excitement. He has so much frightful energy that he can do tasks in hours that would take most people days. On the other hand he can't sit still--literally. He says he has no choice, that before the day begins the decisions--to fly to Paris, to engage in marathon sex, to obsessively clean and scrub every square inch of his New York apartment, etc.--are made for him. He craves excitement and danger, and gets high by giving himself too much work to do, making him afraid he can't finish; and he gets high from shopping sprees where he spends more than he can afford. He's a madman of energy, an electrifying near genius who used to get off on tearing his hair out by the roots as a kid, who as an adult can't function without half a dozen different drugs pulsating through his veins and a dozen projects juggled between the hangover gloom and three a.m. He will try anything and anybody. His mind is superfast and his aggression is always threatening to spill over. In addition to stealing his sister's clients, he physically assaults her. When his girl friend of many years finally makes a permanent break from him he stalks her and her boyfriend. Left alone in someone's apartment for a minute he gets up and frantically goes through the drawers and cabinets. From my point of view the clinical malady that goes by the name of bipolar disorder is a kind of survival strategy: one runs around wildly in the spring and summer when there is something to gain, but when the long shadows of autumn arrive, depression takes over. One pulls the deer skin up over one's head and lays dormant burning body fat until the snows turn to tinkling streams, and then the mania returns. Such guys die young, I am told. And they cannot help themselves. Andy in particular cannot help himself. His internal chemistry drives him to extremes. Sadly manic depression, like schizophrenia and autism, are seldom if ever cured. The psychiatric profession prescribes pills, therapies, including electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), counsels and applies various theories in an effort to treat these disorders. What it usually comes up with is more pain and suffering. Behrman's experience is no exception. His crash and burn experience begins when he is indicted for art forgery. Thus begins a downward spiral into increased depression, more violent mood swings, and an increasing inability to function economically amid thoughts of suicide. As the book ends he is taking a regimen of pills that would choke a horse; he has undergone 19 sessions of ECT; his weight at last report was 245 pounds (normal for him would be about 185, so he's sixty pounds overweight). Whereas once he was able to work sixteen hour days, now he has trouble leaving his apartment. Although there is an attempt at a rosy glow as the book ends, it is clear that Andy Behrman is only the shadow of the man he once was. But I think all of us can identify to some extent with Behrman's state of mind. We are all driven at times to overindulgence, to manias of one sort or the other. We all fall into periods of self-doubt and depression. The difference really is one of degree. Yet, as they say in physics, more is different; and in Behrman's case it is dramatically and horribly different. When I feel depressed or anxious; when my brain chemistry points me toward some sort of undefined behavior to satisfy the gloom or restlessness, what I do is exercise. I have found that the troubles of the world and the wild cacophony running round my brain become muted and silenced by the sheer sense of physical exhaustion, a delicious state of mind that wants only water and rest, and then when there is physical rest perhaps something good to eat and then some work and then some sleep, and in this way the brain chemistry is reset. I don't say this will work for people like Behrman. Clearly it has not worked for many others. But I think it should have been (and should be!) tried. Notice that when he was manically working he was happy and healthy, at least for that period of time. Since everything about Behrman goes to extremes, perhaps only the most rigorous and extensive sort of physical exercise program will work. --Dennis Littrell, author of the mystery novel, “Teddy and Teri”

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gabe Labovitz

    I picked it up thinking it would be the "loosey-goosey" beach read after (re)reading The Silmarillion. And it was that; for the first half I read it just being annoyed at the entitled, smug Manhattanite, with too much money, drugs, sex at his disposal. But then the second half is more jarring, as Behrman describes his real battles with mental illness and his treatment regimens. I'm trying to remember: is this the book (a book? the book?) where the author got in trouble for plagiarizing most of i I picked it up thinking it would be the "loosey-goosey" beach read after (re)reading The Silmarillion. And it was that; for the first half I read it just being annoyed at the entitled, smug Manhattanite, with too much money, drugs, sex at his disposal. But then the second half is more jarring, as Behrman describes his real battles with mental illness and his treatment regimens. I'm trying to remember: is this the book (a book? the book?) where the author got in trouble for plagiarizing most of it? No matter, I enjoyed it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gina C.

    His childhood touched my heart as it mirrors my own. It's as if I've told him my secrets and he's written them I this book. It pains me to see such an exceptionally bright individual become consumed by sex and drug addiction. As someone who's bipolar and cognoscente of my weaknesses, I see some of his in me. They are largely dormant but still existent when I'm manic. By comparison, I must admit to being a coward in comparison to Andy - I could never strip myself bare so publicly and for this we His childhood touched my heart as it mirrors my own. It's as if I've told him my secrets and he's written them I this book. It pains me to see such an exceptionally bright individual become consumed by sex and drug addiction. As someone who's bipolar and cognoscente of my weaknesses, I see some of his in me. They are largely dormant but still existent when I'm manic. By comparison, I must admit to being a coward in comparison to Andy - I could never strip myself bare so publicly and for this we must give him praise no matter how raunchy, crude or mildly pornographic parts of this book may be.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

    This was amazing because you really get to understand Andy's manic depression first hand. As a clinician this helped me get a better understanding of what patients are experiencing/feeling when managing their mental illness. Book also explores ECT which was very interesting. Highly recommend if you want to get a better idea of how someone is managing their mental illness, it definitely opens your eyes.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Mind blowing, eye opening, totally amazing. Told from the perspective of a Manic/Depressive (BiPolar) young man who would stay awake for days and spend thousands of dollars in one shopping trip, then crash. He relays his personal battles with himself and those around him, as well as his struggles to find a solution to the mania that is his life. I read this book many years ago, and it still stays with me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alissa Wolf

    "Electro Boy" is as a riveting, well-written, mind-bending read. The book takes the reader on a no-holds-barred journey into the psyche of the author and his struggles with bipolar disorder. I read this book when it was first released, and it has haunted me ever since. One of the best contemporary books about mental illness on the market, and wildly entertaining, despite the decidedly dark subject matter.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Koblos

    Great book! Grants you a direct view into the mind of a manic depressive. Most interestingly, he doesn't even realize that something is not quite right with him, until the very end of the book. Meanwhile his supposedly "all-too-normal" story takes you on a roller-coaster ride involving international art forgery, side gigs as a stripper, being the best dressed student on his campus, all related in a funny, exciting, and breathtaking way.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy Krichman Slutzky

    I get it, a bipolar memoir is bound to be a little difficult to follow. I'm sure it was no accident that the more the author understand and successfully treated his mental illness, the more the narrative became simplier, easier to follow. It is an accurate depiction of bipolar and how difficult some cases are to manage and medicate.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I have read this book 4 times now. I also wrote an essay on it as part of an assignment for my MSc Mental Health. It isn't a work of literary genius by any stretch. But the book is an incredible, personal account of living with bipolar disorder and the social issues that come with it. Really powerful stuff.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    A fascinating look into the inside world of bipolar disorder. During periods of undiagnosed mania Behmrman maxed out his credit card, stole art from an icon, fenced it in China and engaged in risky sex. All set in the backdrop of the manic 80's this book reads like a great novel but it's all true. I don't know why it hasn't been made into a movie yet.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    A memoir of mania so intense that you experience the bipolar roller coaster ride first hand... you're in it with Behrman and experience it as he does. An incredibly well-written memoir and an important read for anyone who has lived with bipolar disorder or cares for someone who does.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mia Siegert

    The narrative in ELECTROBOY along with the utter raw, grittiness of it is fantastic. It's gripping and a page turner, a great account of a person who did horrible things without shying clear of what they've done. I read this for an Abnormal Psychology course and never regretted it! :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Describing someone as bipolar has become too colloquial in our society. It's helpful to be reminded about what real mania and manic depression looks like. The writing was bland at times and almost monotonous.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This is an excellent depiction of bipolar disorder. I use it as a teaching tool in my General and Abnormal Psychology courses. The author writes as if in the throes of a manic episode and when he talks about depression you can feel his pain and hopelessness.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    My brother is bipolar so I had a special connection with this book, but it is well written and I found it to be a quick exciting read that anyone could get into.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hemingway

    Takes you on the roller coaster ride that is true manic-depression. Excellent book but like the disorder, very sad and disturbing at times.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christina Gerberich

    Electro Boy was awesome. It gave great insight to the perils of bipolar disorder. Andy Behrman showed both the good and the bad sides of the disease.

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