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Crucial Conversations Skills (EBOOK BUNDLE)

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How Do You Communicate When the Stakes Are High? Learn how with these TWO GROUNDBREAKING BOOKS in ONE eBOOK PACKAGE! In any organization, the best laid plans boil down to one simple thing: how well we come together to bring them to fruition. But more often than not, we end up dealing with people who come across as disagreeable, stubborn, or even obstructive. And emotions flare up. How Do You Communicate When the Stakes Are High? Learn how with these TWO GROUNDBREAKING BOOKS in ONE eBOOK PACKAGE! In any organization, the best laid plans boil down to one simple thing: how well we come together to bring them to fruition. But more often than not, we end up dealing with people who come across as disagreeable, stubborn, or even obstructive. And emotions flare up. The only way to get things done is to step up to the plate . . . by stepping back from our emotions. Written by a team of experts from the world-renowned training firm VitalSmarts, these two books provide the skills you need to make every interaction fruitful and productive in even the most emotional situations. eBook package includes: CRUCIAL CONVERSATIONS The New York Times bestselling Crucial Conversations has sparked a revolution in how people communicate to achieve common goals. Now, the revised second edition builds on this decade-long legacy of success to get professionals at every level and in all professions talking with partners, bosses, employees, clients—not at them. Learn proven methods for turning the focus of hot-button discussions—job performance, customer satisfaction, interpersonal matters—away from subjective points of view and toward productive, mutually beneficial conclusions. “[Crucial Conversations] draws our attention to those defining moments that literally shape our lives, our relationships, and our world. . . . This book deserves to take its place as one of the key thought leadership contributions of our time.” —from the Foreword by Stephen R. Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People “The quality of your life comes out of the quality of your dialogues and conversations. Here’s how to instantly uplift your crucial conversations.” —Mark Victor Hansen, co-creator of the #1 New York Times bestselling series Chicken Soup for the Soul® CRUCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY Hold anyone accountable. Master performance discussions. Get RESULTS. Broken promises, missed deadlines, poor behavior--they don't just make others' lives miserable; they can sap up to 50 percent of organizational performance and account for the vast majority of divorces. Crucial Accountability offers the tools for improving relationships in the workplace and in life and for resolving all these problems--permanently. PRAISE FOR CRUCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY: "Revolutionary ideas ... opportunities for breakthrough ..." -- Stephen R. Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People "Unleash the true potential of a relationship or organization and move it to the next level." -- Ken Blanchard, coauthor of The One Minute Manager "The most recommended and most effective resource in my library." -- Stacey Allerton Firth, Vice President, Human Resources, Ford of Canada "Brilliant strategies for those difficult discussions at home and in the workplace." -- Soledad O’Brien, CNN news anchor and producer "This book is the real deal.... Read it, underline it, learn from it. It's a gem.


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How Do You Communicate When the Stakes Are High? Learn how with these TWO GROUNDBREAKING BOOKS in ONE eBOOK PACKAGE! In any organization, the best laid plans boil down to one simple thing: how well we come together to bring them to fruition. But more often than not, we end up dealing with people who come across as disagreeable, stubborn, or even obstructive. And emotions flare up. How Do You Communicate When the Stakes Are High? Learn how with these TWO GROUNDBREAKING BOOKS in ONE eBOOK PACKAGE! In any organization, the best laid plans boil down to one simple thing: how well we come together to bring them to fruition. But more often than not, we end up dealing with people who come across as disagreeable, stubborn, or even obstructive. And emotions flare up. The only way to get things done is to step up to the plate . . . by stepping back from our emotions. Written by a team of experts from the world-renowned training firm VitalSmarts, these two books provide the skills you need to make every interaction fruitful and productive in even the most emotional situations. eBook package includes: CRUCIAL CONVERSATIONS The New York Times bestselling Crucial Conversations has sparked a revolution in how people communicate to achieve common goals. Now, the revised second edition builds on this decade-long legacy of success to get professionals at every level and in all professions talking with partners, bosses, employees, clients—not at them. Learn proven methods for turning the focus of hot-button discussions—job performance, customer satisfaction, interpersonal matters—away from subjective points of view and toward productive, mutually beneficial conclusions. “[Crucial Conversations] draws our attention to those defining moments that literally shape our lives, our relationships, and our world. . . . This book deserves to take its place as one of the key thought leadership contributions of our time.” —from the Foreword by Stephen R. Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People “The quality of your life comes out of the quality of your dialogues and conversations. Here’s how to instantly uplift your crucial conversations.” —Mark Victor Hansen, co-creator of the #1 New York Times bestselling series Chicken Soup for the Soul® CRUCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY Hold anyone accountable. Master performance discussions. Get RESULTS. Broken promises, missed deadlines, poor behavior--they don't just make others' lives miserable; they can sap up to 50 percent of organizational performance and account for the vast majority of divorces. Crucial Accountability offers the tools for improving relationships in the workplace and in life and for resolving all these problems--permanently. PRAISE FOR CRUCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY: "Revolutionary ideas ... opportunities for breakthrough ..." -- Stephen R. Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People "Unleash the true potential of a relationship or organization and move it to the next level." -- Ken Blanchard, coauthor of The One Minute Manager "The most recommended and most effective resource in my library." -- Stacey Allerton Firth, Vice President, Human Resources, Ford of Canada "Brilliant strategies for those difficult discussions at home and in the workplace." -- Soledad O’Brien, CNN news anchor and producer "This book is the real deal.... Read it, underline it, learn from it. It's a gem.

30 review for Crucial Conversations Skills (EBOOK BUNDLE)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristy Tillman

    If you want to really help people excel in life - this is a must have book on communication. It really deals with so much more than communication and confrontation. The chapter on motivation has given me so much more understanding on how people are motivated and it gave me some really great tools to help others and myself get unstuck. I also loved this quote on safety "At the foundation of every successful confrontation lies safety. When others feel frightened or nervous or otherwise unsafe, you If you want to really help people excel in life - this is a must have book on communication. It really deals with so much more than communication and confrontation. The chapter on motivation has given me so much more understanding on how people are motivated and it gave me some really great tools to help others and myself get unstuck. I also loved this quote on safety "At the foundation of every successful confrontation lies safety. When others feel frightened or nervous or otherwise unsafe, you can't talk about anything. But if you can create safety, you can talk with almost anyone about almost anything - even about failed promises."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    I'm not much of a confrontational person because I lose control when emotions and stakes are high. But after reading this book, I really do feel like I could talk to anyone about anything, if I had the time to plan for it. It takes preparation to make a crucial confrontation go well. What I liked from the book is how the authors encourage you to have your crucial confrontations. So often we shy out of them and endure the unpleasant consequences. It's almost always worth it to have them. Ano I'm not much of a confrontational person because I lose control when emotions and stakes are high. But after reading this book, I really do feel like I could talk to anyone about anything, if I had the time to plan for it. It takes preparation to make a crucial confrontation go well. What I liked from the book is how the authors encourage you to have your crucial confrontations. So often we shy out of them and endure the unpleasant consequences. It's almost always worth it to have them. Another main point I really liked is how they tell you to get your story straight. We so often assign horrible character traits to someone causing us grief. Instead, we need to ask ourselves, 'Why would a rational, intelligent person act this way?' And examine if we are part of the problem. Those are only a few of the great steps to having a successful conversation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sunny

    I thought this was a good book overall. I was using this as a review and research material for a concept I am also putting together called "brutiful conversations". This book is essentially about the art of confronting other individuals in as safe a way as possible which allows individuals to articulate some of their challenging thoughts and messages they often want to convey to other colleagues or family members but are unable to do so for a variety of reasons. Not be up able to have these conv I thought this was a good book overall. I was using this as a review and research material for a concept I am also putting together called "brutiful conversations". This book is essentially about the art of confronting other individuals in as safe a way as possible which allows individuals to articulate some of their challenging thoughts and messages they often want to convey to other colleagues or family members but are unable to do so for a variety of reasons. Not be up able to have these conversations can have hugely deleterious effects on any organisation or even a household as well where people don’t have the ability to speak truth to power or to articulate what it is that is gnawing away deep deep inside of their minds. This was a follow on from another book called crucial conversations. I highly recommend both of these books; and here are my favourite bits from the book: •In the best companies people will hold a crucial confrontation face-to-face and in the moment.This of course takes skill. •We can’t go in determined to fix everyone else and expect to get the results we are really after, we can only really ever change ourselves. •Perhaps the largest mistake we are making is exaggerating the cost of confronting an issue, This stems from the erroneous belief that the existing world always punishes people who are naive enough to speak their minds. •Effective problem solvers observe an infraction and then tell themselves a more complete and accurate story. Instead of asking what’s the matter with that person? They ask why would a reasonable rational and decent person do things like that? In asking this humanising question the individual is able to routinely master crucial confrontations and adapt to any situation. Instead of arguing the others are misbehaving only because of personal characteristics influence conversation Masters look to the environment and ask what other sources of influence are acting on this person? What is causing this person to do that?. •Admitting that problem might stem from several different causes changes our whole approach. We aren't certain, we aren’t smug, we aren't angry and we slowdown, we're curious instead of being boiling mad. We feel the need to gather in all data rather Then charge in guns all blazing. We moved from Judge jury and executioner to curious participant. •When others know that you value them as a person and care about their interests they will give you an amazing amount of leeway. They will let you say almost anything. That’s why your four-year-old granddaughter can tell you that you are fat without offending you. You know that she loves and respects you and that her motives are pure. This after all is an innocent child. However if what you say or how you say it causes others to conclude that you do not respect him or that you have selfish and perverse motives nothing you say will work. •First imagine what others might Mistakenly conclude. Second immediately explain that this is what you DO NOT not mean. Third as a contrasting point explain what you do Very clearly mean. The important part is the do not portion of the statement. Explaining about you do not mean early in the conversation when giving them feedback. •Here are some of the factors that Ricky considers as he contemplates the reason why he thinks his wife is always staying out late with work and what some of the logical arguments may be for her to be doing that and why she may not just simply be having an affair. Number one Ricky knows that Eleanor has a strong desire to succeed she is climbing the ladder at work and is willing to pay the price. Number two she may be avoiding talking to Ricky because she worries about having an ugly confrontation with him. Number three he is clearly contributing. He has taken to making sarcastic comments about the time she spends with her boss he has been much less affectionate lately. Of course she finds less joy in being around him. Number four Eleanor has seemed especially anxious about their expenses that could be showing up in her acceptance of more overtime. And the five they work schedules are keeping them from spending much time together which can’t be helping. As Ricky explores other explanations something profound happens to him he calms down. Of course he is careful to not let this line of reasoning talk him into blaming himself. His goal is simply to balance the lying cheating wife story with other possibilities. He wants to be able to enter the conversation without adrenaline rushing through his veins turning him into a argumentative monster. The effect of this is significant. The new story creates a sense of curiosity and compassion. He begins to hold his suspicions more tentatively. He still wants to talk but is less inclined to become emotional and leap in with that accusation.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh Steimle

    It's been a little while since I read Crucial Conversations, so maybe I'm forgetting things, but it seems to me like this book is more or less more of the same. In that sense, it's good stuff. But if you're looking for something exciting and new that gives you valuable information on top of what you already learned from Crucial Conversations, well, not so much. I'd treat it more as an appendix to the original as opposed to a new volume. I'd give it four stars for the content, but only three sinc It's been a little while since I read Crucial Conversations, so maybe I'm forgetting things, but it seems to me like this book is more or less more of the same. In that sense, it's good stuff. But if you're looking for something exciting and new that gives you valuable information on top of what you already learned from Crucial Conversations, well, not so much. I'd treat it more as an appendix to the original as opposed to a new volume. I'd give it four stars for the content, but only three since I think it would have been better to just add this material into a new and expanded version of Crucial Conversations.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    This is an interesting book with many great suggestions for handling confrontations. The suggestions are well thought out and make a lot of sense. However, for me, they process of preparing and handling personal confrontations is to detailed and lengthy that by the time I get through the process, the person I am involved with will have died of old age. In real life situations where confrontations come up so quickly, are so involved and complicated, the intense evaluation of the situation is subj This is an interesting book with many great suggestions for handling confrontations. The suggestions are well thought out and make a lot of sense. However, for me, they process of preparing and handling personal confrontations is to detailed and lengthy that by the time I get through the process, the person I am involved with will have died of old age. In real life situations where confrontations come up so quickly, are so involved and complicated, the intense evaluation of the situation is subject to error. The real questions may not be discovered until too late in the process. I wonder how effective this intense on-the-spot evaluation process will actually work in real time for me. I do intend to at least try the process.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Bond

    A very interesting and helpful resource in dealing with those uncomfortable situations that often waste time and leave with hurt feelings. However, it was quite a convoluted way to explain common sense, especially since there was too often little in exact details to handling a situation. To put it simply, imagine reading a book on how to change the oil in a car. If this author wrote that book, you would know all the signs leading up to changing the oil, but none on exactly how to do it. Still, t A very interesting and helpful resource in dealing with those uncomfortable situations that often waste time and leave with hurt feelings. However, it was quite a convoluted way to explain common sense, especially since there was too often little in exact details to handling a situation. To put it simply, imagine reading a book on how to change the oil in a car. If this author wrote that book, you would know all the signs leading up to changing the oil, but none on exactly how to do it. Still, this book does provide helpful information, and the additional activities with the website truly gives you all the tools in seeing the signs of a crucial confrontation, analyzing those signs, and ultimately coming up with your own solution.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mina Soare

    Clear-cut and well-organised, but how applicable? This is a often-recommended book: it has everyday scenarios, clear acronyms and a cohesive structure. As a person who grimly goes alea iacta est into confrontations, the book presents numerous elegant options. They are all applicable, accessible to all and obviously better alternatives to "throw it out there and outrun the others until they run out of steam and they are willing to listen". So far, the only issue I have found is that it di Clear-cut and well-organised, but how applicable? This is a often-recommended book: it has everyday scenarios, clear acronyms and a cohesive structure. As a person who grimly goes alea iacta est into confrontations, the book presents numerous elegant options. They are all applicable, accessible to all and obviously better alternatives to "throw it out there and outrun the others until they run out of steam and they are willing to listen". So far, the only issue I have found is that it didn't cram in enough examples to allow the reader to practice the mechanism on, only enough to exemplify it. Practice irl, it is.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marsha

    It is a helpful resource for dealing with uncomfortable situations. I have already experienced success in its application. The principles it uses to guide accountability conversations are wholistic and well grounded, rather than a set of gimmicks or tricks to get people to bend to the desired outcome. The process leads to a win-win situation with both parties becoming better people.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denise Nutt-Beers

    The business communication ideas in this book are sound. However, there are two example stories in this book that should banish it back to the 1950s. In one, the author uses the term “hussy” to describe a woman - clearly unacceptable in 2019, particularly in a business setting. In the other example, a husband tries to coerce his wife into an intimate encounter when she clearly says no. This is not a communication issue for the business environment. It perpetuates patriarchal stereotypes - clearl The business communication ideas in this book are sound. However, there are two example stories in this book that should banish it back to the 1950s. In one, the author uses the term “hussy” to describe a woman - clearly unacceptable in 2019, particularly in a business setting. In the other example, a husband tries to coerce his wife into an intimate encounter when she clearly says no. This is not a communication issue for the business environment. It perpetuates patriarchal stereotypes - clearly unacceptable for the business world. Perhaps the author could take a moment to review the audience for the book. These outdated ideas about women have no place in the current business climate. I gave it two stars for the excellent ideas it offers, but they are lost in the misogyny.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dhara Parekh

    I didn't know how much I needed this book until I read it for one of my classes. As someone who has had hard time confronting people all her life, this was a precious little tool to learn those little techniques that could be used to have a proper 'accountability conversation' with someone you need to confront.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    From beginning to quarter end of the book is very hard to understand, perhaps there were a lot of metaphors? however the end part is easily understandable and relate able.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chrisanne

    Riveting and sooooo applicable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Richfuel

    Crucial Accountability “If something comes up, let me know right away.” Then decide together. THE BIG IDEAS FROM EACH STEP: Choose What and If • What - Ask yourself what you really want. You can talk about the content, the pattern, or the relationship. To stay focused, ask what you really want. • If - Are you talking yourself out of an accountability discussion? Don’t let fear substitute for reason. Think carefully not just about the risks o Crucial Accountability “If something comes up, let me know right away.” Then decide together. THE BIG IDEAS FROM EACH STEP: Choose What and If • What - Ask yourself what you really want. You can talk about the content, the pattern, or the relationship. To stay focused, ask what you really want. • If - Are you talking yourself out of an accountability discussion? Don’t let fear substitute for reason. Think carefully not just about the risks of having the conversation but also about the risks of not having it. Master my stories Instead of assuming the worst and then acting in ways that confirm your story, stop and tell the rest of the story. Ask: “why would a reasonable person not do what he or she promised?“ “What role might I have played?“ When you see the other person as a human being rather than a villain, you’re ready to begin. Describe the gap Make it safe by starting with the facts and describing the gap between what was expected and what was observed. Tentatively share your story or only after you’ve shared your fax. And with a question to help diagnose. Make it motivating and easy After you’ve paused to diagnose, listen for motivation and ability. Remember you rarely need power. In fact, power puts you at risk. Instead, make it motivating and make it easy. To do that, explore the six sources of influence. Remember to consider the social and structural sources of influence. Agree on a plan and follow up. Remember who does what by win and then follow what this idea is simple and services it’s own reminder. Then asked to make sure you’re not leaving out any details or missing any possible barriers. Stay focused and flexible As other issues come up, don’t meander; consciously choose whether to change the conversation to the new issue. Waive the new infraction. If it’s more serious or time sensitive, deal with it. If it is not, don’t get sidetracked.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barry Davis

    Subtitled “Tools for Resolving Violated Expectations, Broken Commitments, and Bad Behavior,” this book is the updated version of “Crucial Conversations.” The authors are the leaders of Vitalsmarts, an innovator in best-practices training products and services. After describing exactly what “crucial accountability” is, the authors start in Part One by having the reader look in the mirror, determining what should be addressed personally before any discussion takes place. Choosing “what” and “if” f Subtitled “Tools for Resolving Violated Expectations, Broken Commitments, and Bad Behavior,” this book is the updated version of “Crucial Conversations.” The authors are the leaders of Vitalsmarts, an innovator in best-practices training products and services. After describing exactly what “crucial accountability” is, the authors start in Part One by having the reader look in the mirror, determining what should be addressed personally before any discussion takes place. Choosing “what” and “if” focuses on what conversation should take place, if any. They encourage you to “master your story,” being sure that your mind is in the right place before you say a word. In other words don’t assume you know what caused anyone to act the way they did! You’re probably wrong! Part Two focuses on “creating safety,” providing practical advice on how to start an accountability discussion, creating motivation for change, encouraging commitment and staying focused while being flexible in the face of the inevitable “curve balls” that often occur. Part Three, “Move to Action,” speaks to agreeing to a specific plan, following up, dealing with complicated problems, as well as a great chapter on what they call the “Yeah-Buts” (”I already tried that, and it didn’t work!”). This extremely practical book closes with a self-assessment for the readers to measure their skills in holding an accountability discussion, as well as presenting diagnostic questions for the author’s “Six Source Model” to assist in understanding why people do what they do (back to Master the Story). The six sources they suggest are 1) Self, Motivate (Pain and Pleasure), 2) Self, Enable (Strengths and Weaknesses), 3)Others, Motivate (Praise and Pressure), 4)Others, Enable (Helps and Hindrances). 5)Things, Motivate (Carrots and Sticks) and 6)Things, Enable (Bridges and Barriers). The appendix closes with advice on actions to take “When Things Go Right” as well as providing a collection of discussion questions for reading groups. An exceptional resource for anyone who needs to “have that talk,” whether at home or in the workplace!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Angela Lam

    This book addresses how to deal with disappointments, and to handle sensitive discussions around broken promises, missed expectations, and bad behaviour. [Vs "Crucial Conversations" deals with disagreements] The ideas and tips are good, probably one of the better books on communications. Especially since such scenarios are something that all of us face at work and at home, all the time. But, the writing's style is really convoluted, which makes the book a little hard to rea This book addresses how to deal with disappointments, and to handle sensitive discussions around broken promises, missed expectations, and bad behaviour. [Vs "Crucial Conversations" deals with disagreements] The ideas and tips are good, probably one of the better books on communications. Especially since such scenarios are something that all of us face at work and at home, all the time. But, the writing's style is really convoluted, which makes the book a little hard to read. E.g. this paragraph is supposed to say that adults also have peer pressure: "From the way adults talk, you'd think peer pressure disappears a few weeks after the senior prom. We constantly warn our chil­dren against the insidious forces wielded by their friends. Yet rarely do we consider the fact that those forces aren't switched off in some mystical ritual when we finish high school..." Could have been written in a simpler, more straightforward way? The authors tried to include chapter summaries + a key diagram (which helps a little), but since this is a how-to book (rather than a concept book), the devil's in the details, and the details are lost in the pages. Would have given it 5* if not for the writing. Book summary at: https://readingraphics.com/book-summa...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vasyl Pasternak

    The book is full of recipes how to behave in tough conversations. Highly recommended to everyone, who works or leads groups

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Morgan

    Good companion to Crucial Conversations, focused specifically on dealing with accountability conversations. Useful read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    Perhaps there are some great ideas there but the book as a whole is poorly written. Unorganized.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shhhhh Ahhhhh

    Good book. Not sure I got as much out of this as I could have. I think I probably should have read Crucial Conversations first. That's on my short list now. My major takeaway from this book was safety. It hasn't really been a consideration of mine but the author goes through great pains to insist that safety be created and maintained for the duration of a confrontation, or else people will retreat to using silence or violence to attempt to make themselves safe. Confrontations happen in one on on Good book. Not sure I got as much out of this as I could have. I think I probably should have read Crucial Conversations first. That's on my short list now. My major takeaway from this book was safety. It hasn't really been a consideration of mine but the author goes through great pains to insist that safety be created and maintained for the duration of a confrontation, or else people will retreat to using silence or violence to attempt to make themselves safe. Confrontations happen in one on one conversations, not in a group environment where safety can't be established. Confrontations should address problems more than feelings in order to maintain the safe environment. All confrontation needs stem from problems, typically of violated expectations, and you have to choose which problem you want to address and which it is strategically wise to address. In business, this may involve work expectations that have been violated. You have to establish, in rapport, what the shortfall is, whether it be motivation or skills, before you can make any meaningful attempts to resolve problems. They also address steps for escalation if needed. I'll probably need a reread after reading Crucial Conversations so I can understand better.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Overall, a good read and definitely a resource I'm keeping at hand. The work originates from the authors' desire to capture and study what enables individuals to excel in accountability discussions. I especially enjoyed the chapters on emotional/psychological self-awareness ("Mastering Our Stories") and the down-to-earth techniques for stepping out silence to give voice to accountability failures ("Describing the Gap"). As with Crucial Conversations, I deeply enjoyed the authors' huma Overall, a good read and definitely a resource I'm keeping at hand. The work originates from the authors' desire to capture and study what enables individuals to excel in accountability discussions. I especially enjoyed the chapters on emotional/psychological self-awareness ("Mastering Our Stories") and the down-to-earth techniques for stepping out silence to give voice to accountability failures ("Describing the Gap"). As with Crucial Conversations, I deeply enjoyed the authors' humanist approach and find it especially affirming that they've based their philosophy and techniques off of observations of real people who are highly successful in holding accountability discussions. For some reason, this was a more difficult read than Crucial Conversations. I think one reason may be the unexpected shifts into scenarios which pepper the authors' descriptions of some (really powerful) philosophies and techniques. They got to be distracting at times. It could have been the same way in Crucial Conversations (it was a while ago since I've read it and I've lent my copy to my boyfriend), but I don't think so...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Billie Pritchett

    Crucial Accountability isn't a bad book, just not to my taste. I thought it would be more helpful than it was, and this could be my failing. The book offers advice about how to deal with problem situations in the workplace where you have to talk with an employee or colleague or superior and get them to understand when they've made a mistake or not followed procedure, etc. What made the book so difficult for me is that the book does not deliver a finite set of principles you can follow. What is good about the Crucial Accountability isn't a bad book, just not to my taste. I thought it would be more helpful than it was, and this could be my failing. The book offers advice about how to deal with problem situations in the workplace where you have to talk with an employee or colleague or superior and get them to understand when they've made a mistake or not followed procedure, etc. What made the book so difficult for me is that the book does not deliver a finite set of principles you can follow. What is good about the book, however, is that there is a diagnostic in the appendix where you can assess yourself and see what areas you need to work on. Then if you wanted, you could go back and read the chapters that are pertinent to the areas you would need to work on in holding yourself and others accountable for actions in the workplace. Again, not for me because I like lists. I can process information better if something is billed as 10 rules, seven habits, etc. Beyond that, I can't retain the info long-term.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mttyd

    Really loved the first couple chapters Really loved the first couple chapters. Although it seemed too many at times having examples of both work and personal issues helped to frame the concepts well. For me it seemed this book lost a little horsepower after the first few chapters. The concept of accountability comes from an authoritarian view rather than one of mutual benefit. I wish a few more chapters could have been written on personal accountability as I think one needs to master this before Really loved the first couple chapters Really loved the first couple chapters. Although it seemed too many at times having examples of both work and personal issues helped to frame the concepts well. For me it seemed this book lost a little horsepower after the first few chapters. The concept of accountability comes from an authoritarian view rather than one of mutual benefit. I wish a few more chapters could have been written on personal accountability as I think one needs to master this before attempting to hold others accountable. Good read overall. I would recommend.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sergey Shishkin

    Well structured and practical. My takeaways were: * Focus on what to confront: content, pattern or relationship; * Identify if the gap is motivational or lack of ability; * Identify personal, social and structural influences on both: motivation and ability. I see how Crucial Confrontations can be combined with Quiet Leadership: Six Steps to Transforming Performance at Work. Minus one star for not so useful companion content for the audio version of the book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chase

    This is a dry book, and could do with better storytelling, but then I guess I am just used to The Anatomy of Peace books being better written. That say there is some good information in this book, and a good approach to how to solve and hold crucial confrontations, just not in an easy to digest format, and I would not have normally read or listened to this book except that my hubby was assigned it at work and it's helpful for us to both read it and be able to discuss it. Not sure I wi This is a dry book, and could do with better storytelling, but then I guess I am just used to The Anatomy of Peace books being better written. That say there is some good information in this book, and a good approach to how to solve and hold crucial confrontations, just not in an easy to digest format, and I would not have normally read or listened to this book except that my hubby was assigned it at work and it's helpful for us to both read it and be able to discuss it. Not sure I will read the next one or not because this one was such a slaug.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Margo

    This is an excellent companion books to Crucial Conversations. This book focuses more on conversations where there is a significant difference in what was expected and what the outcome became. Tons of overlap with relationships and families, as well as highly applicable in business and work situations. It sounds strange and masochistic, but I am really excited to have a crucial confrontation situation in my line of work come up in the near future so I can practice the strategies presented in the This is an excellent companion books to Crucial Conversations. This book focuses more on conversations where there is a significant difference in what was expected and what the outcome became. Tons of overlap with relationships and families, as well as highly applicable in business and work situations. It sounds strange and masochistic, but I am really excited to have a crucial confrontation situation in my line of work come up in the near future so I can practice the strategies presented in the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve Campbell

    In an engaging and entertaining style, the authors trick their readers into learning how to engage in crucial confrontations that enable them to meet their goals and maintain healthy relationships. The authors begin by defining what they mean by crucial confrontations and then teach us what to do before, during, and after them. The book is loaded with stories and dialogues that illustrate each step of a crucial confrontation. The humor sprinkled throughout makes this book not only an informative In an engaging and entertaining style, the authors trick their readers into learning how to engage in crucial confrontations that enable them to meet their goals and maintain healthy relationships. The authors begin by defining what they mean by crucial confrontations and then teach us what to do before, during, and after them. The book is loaded with stories and dialogues that illustrate each step of a crucial confrontation. The humor sprinkled throughout makes this book not only an informative, but also an enjoyable read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jason Bourg

    This book is extremely relatable and should be standard high school education material. Not only will the techniques and topics of this book improve the lives of those who use them but it would cut through a lot of [email protected] that we deal with everyday. Extremely well thought out and written, I can't recommend this book enough. Looking for used copies to pass out to people. Unfortunately it appears to be out of print.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ayesha

    Everything these authors put out is pure gold! Like Crucial Conversations and Influencer, Crucial Confrontations is a handbook for life and leadership. I sincerely wish I had read it many years ago, it would have saved me years of heartache. The book is full of practical wisdom for creating accountability while remaining firmly grounded in the principles of honesty, sincerity and open communication. You can bet I'm going to keep this bible of problem resolution close at hand!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Will Mays

    The team walk you through the right thing to discuss (Getting the story right, and Content, Pattern, Relationship) and how to make it safe so the other party doesn't block you off by being defensive - and how to get back to safety if you leave it. A good book that with proper implementation in people's lives should make a profound impact to your relationships.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

    Really very good. I've heard rave reviews about the book both from my pastor and in the business setting, so perhaps I was thinking there was some incredible new thing I would learn. I think that I probably new and tried to practice a good 75% of this already. The goodness of the book is in the deliberate thought process that will lead me effective crucial confrontations 95% of the time.

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