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Wednesday Comics

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This outsized hardcover edition collects the entire critically acclaimed Wednesday Comics series that revisited the classic weekly newspaper full-page comics section. It features 16-different stories starring the World's Greatest Super Heroes including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, the Flash, Metamorpho and the Metal Men, written and Illustrated by some of This outsized hardcover edition collects the entire critically acclaimed Wednesday Comics series that revisited the classic weekly newspaper full-page comics section. It features 16-different stories starring the World's Greatest Super Heroes including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, the Flash, Metamorpho and the Metal Men, written and Illustrated by some of the comic industry's top talents. The 11" x 17" trim size to approximate the Sunday funnies was spearheaded by DCU Editorial Art Director Mark Chiarello, whose past editing credits include BATMAN BLACK AND WHITE, and DC: THE NEW FRONTIER. The full list of featured stories and creators is as follows: BATMAN, by the Eisner Award-winning 100 BULLETS team of writer Brian Azzarello and artist Eduardo Risso ADAM STRANGE, by writer/artist Paul Pope (BATMAN: YEAR 100) METAMORPHO, written by New York Times best-selling writer Neil Gaiman with Art by Eisner Award-winner Michael Allred (Madman) THE DEMON AND CATWOMAN, written by Walter Simonson (Thor, MANHUNTER) with Art by famed DC cover artist Brian Stelfreeze DEADMAN, written by Dave Bullock and Vinton Heuck, Art by Dave Bullock KAMANDI, written by Dave Gibbons (WATCHMEN, GREEN LANTERN CORPS) with Art by Ryan Sook (Buffy The Vampire Slayer, ARKHAM ASYLUM: LIVING HELL) SUPERMAN, written by John Arcudi (The Mask) with Art by Lee Bermejo (JOKER) WONDER WOMAN, written and illustrated by Ben Caldwell (Dare Detectives) GREEN LANTERN, written by Kurt Busiek (TRINITY, ASTRO CITY) with Art by Joe Quiñones (TEEN TITANS GO!) TEEN TITANS, written by Eddie Berganza with Art by Sean Galloway SUPERGIRL, written by Jimmy Palmiotti (JONAH HEX) with Art by Amanda Conner (POWER GIRL) HAWKMAN, written and illustrated by Kyle Baker (PLASTIC MAN, Special Forces) SGT. ROCK, written by Adam Kubert (SUPERMAN: LAST SON), ilustrated by legendary comics artist Joe Kubert THE FLASH, written by Karl Kerschl (TEEN TITANS YEAR ONE, THE FLASH: THE FASTEST MAN ALIVE) and Brenden Fletcher, illustrated by Karl Kerschl METAL MEN, written by Dan DiDio with Art by Ian Churchill (SUPERGIRL)


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This outsized hardcover edition collects the entire critically acclaimed Wednesday Comics series that revisited the classic weekly newspaper full-page comics section. It features 16-different stories starring the World's Greatest Super Heroes including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, the Flash, Metamorpho and the Metal Men, written and Illustrated by some of This outsized hardcover edition collects the entire critically acclaimed Wednesday Comics series that revisited the classic weekly newspaper full-page comics section. It features 16-different stories starring the World's Greatest Super Heroes including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, the Flash, Metamorpho and the Metal Men, written and Illustrated by some of the comic industry's top talents. The 11" x 17" trim size to approximate the Sunday funnies was spearheaded by DCU Editorial Art Director Mark Chiarello, whose past editing credits include BATMAN BLACK AND WHITE, and DC: THE NEW FRONTIER. The full list of featured stories and creators is as follows: BATMAN, by the Eisner Award-winning 100 BULLETS team of writer Brian Azzarello and artist Eduardo Risso ADAM STRANGE, by writer/artist Paul Pope (BATMAN: YEAR 100) METAMORPHO, written by New York Times best-selling writer Neil Gaiman with Art by Eisner Award-winner Michael Allred (Madman) THE DEMON AND CATWOMAN, written by Walter Simonson (Thor, MANHUNTER) with Art by famed DC cover artist Brian Stelfreeze DEADMAN, written by Dave Bullock and Vinton Heuck, Art by Dave Bullock KAMANDI, written by Dave Gibbons (WATCHMEN, GREEN LANTERN CORPS) with Art by Ryan Sook (Buffy The Vampire Slayer, ARKHAM ASYLUM: LIVING HELL) SUPERMAN, written by John Arcudi (The Mask) with Art by Lee Bermejo (JOKER) WONDER WOMAN, written and illustrated by Ben Caldwell (Dare Detectives) GREEN LANTERN, written by Kurt Busiek (TRINITY, ASTRO CITY) with Art by Joe Quiñones (TEEN TITANS GO!) TEEN TITANS, written by Eddie Berganza with Art by Sean Galloway SUPERGIRL, written by Jimmy Palmiotti (JONAH HEX) with Art by Amanda Conner (POWER GIRL) HAWKMAN, written and illustrated by Kyle Baker (PLASTIC MAN, Special Forces) SGT. ROCK, written by Adam Kubert (SUPERMAN: LAST SON), ilustrated by legendary comics artist Joe Kubert THE FLASH, written by Karl Kerschl (TEEN TITANS YEAR ONE, THE FLASH: THE FASTEST MAN ALIVE) and Brenden Fletcher, illustrated by Karl Kerschl METAL MEN, written by Dan DiDio with Art by Ian Churchill (SUPERGIRL)

30 review for Wednesday Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I've tried this behemoth several times, but never made it all the way through -- gave it a more serious shot this time and I'm glad I did. This sort of project shows off why DC serves up my superhero comics of choice, despite the fact that the company as a whole flounders and gets it wrong almost constantly in comparison to the House of Ideas. But Wednesday Comics is equal parts art, retro camp, classic, and bizarre. I love that. I love reading through the comments and seeing that everyone I've tried this behemoth several times, but never made it all the way through -- gave it a more serious shot this time and I'm glad I did. This sort of project shows off why DC serves up my superhero comics of choice, despite the fact that the company as a whole flounders and gets it wrong almost constantly in comparison to the House of Ideas. But Wednesday Comics is equal parts art, retro camp, classic, and bizarre. I love that. I love reading through the comments and seeing that everyone has vastly different takes on what the winners and losers in this collection are. I love that this structurally simple book of fifteen stories turned me on to characters and artists I'd never considered before, while other creators that I thought could do no wrong really just couldn't seem to make it happen. I love that DC made sure to use an equal sampling of A-list and C-list characters in assembling this project. If monthly DC comics were as varied, continuity-free, well-drawn and utterly screwball as this collection -- hell, I might even start buying monthly comics again. I often try to write these superhero reviews to an audience of people who don't read superhero comics, and in that vein I'll say that this is a book I'd like to show my friends who are book snobs and design snobs -- who look at my collection of identically-sized, identically-printed graphic novels and roll their eyes. And because everyone else is doing it, here's my list of good-to-crap: 1. Adam Strange by Paul Pope (This is an artist I came to the collection distinctly DISliking and a character I knew almost nothing about. But HOLY CRAP IT IS INSANE AND BRILLIANT.) 2. Green Lantern by Busiek and Quinones (Busiek is a guy that can just write any character in any format. And the art is UNBELIEVABLE. I would collect a series of this in a second.) 3. Kamandi by Gibbons and Sook (The most intelligently-written of the bunch. Gibbons' grey matter puts everyone else to shame.) 4. Superman by Arcudi and Bermejo (This story is forgettable, but the art is insane. INSANE.) 5. Supergirl by Palmiotti and Conner (I've always found Palmiotti distastefully bad, but this story is adorable and funny and uses great side characters.) 6. Metamorpho by Gaiman and Allred (This team at their worst is still going to be pretty neat. This was pretty neat. Gaiman does a great impression of Peter Milligan doing an impression of Mike Allred.) 7. Flash by Kerschl and Fletcher (This story would be higher on the list if it made any sense. Said another way, this story makes absolutely no sense whatsoever and is still ambitious and well-designed enough to be in the top 50%.) 8. Batman by Azzarello and Risso (I am so utterly bored by this team's ability to be completely adequate.) 9. Deadman by Bullock and Heuck (Award for most second-rate use of a second-rate character by a second-rate creative team. This is right around what I expect from a regular monthly superhero comic.) 10. Sgt Rock by Kubert and son (This should have been higher on the list for overall serviceability, but I just don't like the Kuberts, and I don't think they worked very hard on this or tried to come up with any new twists on a standard war comic.) 11. The Demon and Catwoman by Simonson and Stelfreeze (Probably my highest hopes for the whole collection. Simonson is a genius, but has he ever read a Catwoman comic? And Stelfreeze might just not be that interesting when paints aren't involved.) 12. Teen Titans by Berganza and Galloway (It looked cool, but this was probably the worst writing of the bunch. Not confusing; just stupid.) 13. Wonder Woman by Ben Caldwell (I feel super bad because I'd guess more work went into this story than any other, but I couldn't even read this. It was pretty, but it had like a million panels per page and I don't think Wonder Woman even got into costume until the last two of them. Maybe I'll try it one more time, since it seems like no one else gave it a shot either.) 14. Metal Men by Didio and Garcia-Lopez(Guess what? The EIC with no writing experience wrote a story and it's totally boring, sexist and uses dated cultural references. Whoda thunk?) 15. Hawkman by Kyle Baker (I consider Baker a genre-redefining renaissance man. And I get that this is obviously an experiment with 3D comic art, which I've dabbled in myself. But what happened? Why is this horrifically ugly? Why did he decide to like, not draw it? Why did this get printed at all?)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Like with all anthologies, the rating is really splitting the difference. Some of the stories here were fantastic, others... not so much. The best stories were The Demon and the Catwoman (Teaming up Catwoman and Etrigan was... unexpected. It ended up being fun, even if Catwoman was largely absent in the middle.), Deadman (A character I know little about, but a very interesting story that seemed to really work to his stengths.), Kamandi (Post-apocalyptic and fabulous), Supergirl (Cute Like with all anthologies, the rating is really splitting the difference. Some of the stories here were fantastic, others... not so much. The best stories were The Demon and the Catwoman (Teaming up Catwoman and Etrigan was... unexpected. It ended up being fun, even if Catwoman was largely absent in the middle.), Deadman (A character I know little about, but a very interesting story that seemed to really work to his stengths.), Kamandi (Post-apocalyptic and fabulous), Supergirl (Cute and somewhat silly, and co-starring the Super Pets.), and Metamorpho (A bit of an affectionate parody, though the periodic table pages may have been over-ambitious. The joke ran a little thin.) The Batman, Adam Strange, Hawkman, and Sgt. Rock stories were just not to my taste, though I really disliked the art in Hawkman. I did like the Teen Titans story, but wasn't a fan of the art. The Wonder Woman story I simply couldn't get through because of the style. The rest were good enough. As a whole, there was far more good than bad in the collection, and I'd recommend it to anyone who likes a little camp and a little retro in their comics.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sridhar Reddy

    "Wednesday Comics" is a throwback to a bygone era of when comic strips had a prominent place in the American newspaper. Originally published in 2009 as oversized broadsheet tabloids printed weekly on newsprint, the series harkens the full-page glory of old Winsor McCay strips with the full color of the Sunday pages in the 70s and 80s. The final results are imbalanced in that many of the storylines cannot keep up with the splendid artwork and regal format of the series. But at their wo "Wednesday Comics" is a throwback to a bygone era of when comic strips had a prominent place in the American newspaper. Originally published in 2009 as oversized broadsheet tabloids printed weekly on newsprint, the series harkens the full-page glory of old Winsor McCay strips with the full color of the Sunday pages in the 70s and 80s. The final results are imbalanced in that many of the storylines cannot keep up with the splendid artwork and regal format of the series. But at their worst the stories are entertaining, and at their best they are pure magic. Examples of the latter are "Kamandi: The Last Boy on Earth" by Dave Gibbons and Ryan Sook, and "Strange Adventures" by Paul Pope. Both of these stories embody the classic pulp of the Sunday pages, bringing back the mystique of "Prince Valiant" and "The Phantom" respectively. Many stories in this collection do not work in that they defy the classic format by opting for a modern aesthetic that doesn't translate. In particular, the "Teen Titans" storyline by Eddie Berganza with art by Sean Galloway reflects a modern animated feel, feeling more like an artistically accomplished version of "Pokemon" rather than a classic pulp comic strip. Furthermore, John Arcudi and Lee Bermejo's "Superman" story opts for photorealism, which does not fit at all as a newsprint story. It reads more like a full-color advert. But in all, the hardcover collection of these stories is a simple sight to behold. The large format allows us to explore each frame and fall into them, unlike the microscopic reduction that we find in today's newspapers. If anything, 'Wednesday Comics' is an urgent plea to newspapers to bring back large-format Sunday comic strips, as it eloquently and stunningly makes the case for the level of enjoyment and wonderment that these works of art bring to the reader. Recommended for purists of comics and sequential art.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    Wednesday Comics was a 12-week experiment DC Comics ran last summer. Every week a new newspaper-sized comic was released with each page continuing a character’s story from the week before. Of course major characters like Batman, Superman, and Green Lantern were featured, but some of the more compelling stories featured Kamandi, the last human on a future world inhabited by sentient animals; and Metamorpho, whose ability to transform into any element is lampooned by writer Neil Gaiman. Wednesday Comics was a 12-week experiment DC Comics ran last summer. Every week a new newspaper-sized comic was released with each page continuing a character’s story from the week before. Of course major characters like Batman, Superman, and Green Lantern were featured, but some of the more compelling stories featured Kamandi, the last human on a future world inhabited by sentient animals; and Metamorpho, whose ability to transform into any element is lampooned by writer Neil Gaiman. Since it was experimental, results vary. Deadman, a character I’m not typically interested in, has a great story and the team of Dave Bullock and Vinton Heuck make excellent use of the oversize page. On the other hand, the Wonder Woman story by Ben Caldwell reads like a layout nightmare. My favorite stories were the Metamorpho one mentioned above and Jimmy Palmiotti and Amanda Conner’s Supergirl. Those two are easily the most fun in the collection. Final word: this is an extremely oversized hardcover so expect it to be huge.

  5. 5 out of 5

    M

    DC's "newspaper experiment" is a sight to behold and a treasure to read. Collecting the 12-issue series which allowed populars writers, artists, and characters to be crafted in classic newspaper-style format, Wednesday Comics offers treats for everyone. Brian Azzarello provides a gritty Batman murder mystery, Walt Simonson pairs up the Demon with Catwoman for a mystical theft, and Ben Caldwell offers a visually stunning Wonder Woman tale; other highlights include Kamandi by Dave Gibbons, Amanda DC's "newspaper experiment" is a sight to behold and a treasure to read. Collecting the 12-issue series which allowed populars writers, artists, and characters to be crafted in classic newspaper-style format, Wednesday Comics offers treats for everyone. Brian Azzarello provides a gritty Batman murder mystery, Walt Simonson pairs up the Demon with Catwoman for a mystical theft, and Ben Caldwell offers a visually stunning Wonder Woman tale; other highlights include Kamandi by Dave Gibbons, Amanda Conner's Supergirl, and Dave Bullock's Deadman. yet for my money, the greatest tale is the Metamorpho collaboration between Neil Gaiman and Mike Allred - exquisite!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    Public library copy. I'd love to add this $50 book to my own library someday. I think even the most sophisticated comic book reader won't like all the stories presented here, but there's enough diversity that at least a few tales should appeal to the masses. I really enjoyed the long, vertical presentation with bigger pages (blown up art) compared to the size standardization of most books, but it does make for unusual handling trying to find comfort. For those complaining about discom Public library copy. I'd love to add this $50 book to my own library someday. I think even the most sophisticated comic book reader won't like all the stories presented here, but there's enough diversity that at least a few tales should appeal to the masses. I really enjoyed the long, vertical presentation with bigger pages (blown up art) compared to the size standardization of most books, but it does make for unusual handling trying to find comfort. For those complaining about discomfort reading comics from a heavy iPad I imagine this would be worse. Most stories are 12 pages long and I found I was only able to typically read one story per sitting because of the odd shape, size, and weight of the book. If on the occasion I read two stories in a row I had to reposition myself and the book. As a parent of young girls the Supergirl story was easily the most popular in my household due to Amanda Conner's cute, personalized art style. My oldest is a huge Wonder Woman fan, but found it immensely difficult to waddle through the tiny, dense panels of that story so that was a disappointment as I am sure she did not read the entire story. The small presentation affected their opinion of the art, which I thought was good, they did not, but the small panels did not let the artwork breathe. The same dense criticism could be aimed at the Dead Man story. The Kumandi story was terrific in a Prince Valiant kind of way. It had the heart, adventure, and spirit by design of those old newspaper action adventures. Drawn lovely. The Flash story was a neat time travel story and had an interesting way of leading the readers eye all over the page. The Adam Strange story by Paul Pope was fine, but it wasn't as great as I expected. Perhaps had I read the book out of order and read Kumandi after Adam Strange I'd feel different. I like anything Paul Pope creates, whereas my wife is not a fan of his art style or Charles Burns and dismisses their work at a glance. As I follow writer and artist creators rather than corporate characters the other winners, for me, were (not surprisingly): the Neil Gaiman and Michal Allred Metamorpho story, which introduced Snakes/Chutes and Ladders and found a clever way to use dialogue with every acronym (I think, mind you, I did not verify by counting) from the Periodic Chart. The Brian Azzarello and Edwardo Risso Batman story was good but not great. The Dos Kubert Sgt. Rock story (which I enjoyed and my children did not) was a great reminder how nobody draws WWII Sgt. Rock stories better than Joe Kubert. I even liked the Hawk Man story, which was about as close as anyone got to writing a JLA story. The Metal Men; the Teen Titans; The Demon (meets Catwoman); the Green Lantern, and the Superman stories were all more visually arresting than the plots, which isn't to say they're not good, but I just didn't find those works as interesting.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    I like that DC Comics tries new & different things with their creative projects, such as this very book and Solo: top industry talent(*) (view spoiler)[(*): In the case of 'Wednesday Comics', one story is written by Dan DiDio, whom I would hesitate to consider 'top industry talent'. (hide spoiler)] collaborating on short stories. This book allowed me to read stuff from some of my favourite creators, but also to discover new ones as well. As with any colle I like that DC Comics tries new & different things with their creative projects, such as this very book and Solo: top industry talent(*) (view spoiler)[(*): In the case of 'Wednesday Comics', one story is written by Dan DiDio, whom I would hesitate to consider 'top industry talent'. (hide spoiler)] collaborating on short stories. This book allowed me to read stuff from some of my favourite creators, but also to discover new ones as well. As with any collection of the sort, and depending on your tastes, you are bound to find some great stories and a few not-so-great ones, which leave you scratching your head wondering how this stuff got to be included in the first place. Tastes are as varied as people, so when I rate the stories a certain way, it is very possible that you will disagree with one or a few - or maybe even all of them - and that's okay; that's normal. The best way to enjoy this book is to read it slowly, maybe even only a few pages at a time, in order to better appreciate the art on newspaper-sized sheets. There are stories that I wanted to read before others - some of which were disappointing - and some stories that I put off until later - some of which were better than I'd expected. 5 stars Surprisingly - for me, anyway - the Supergirl story was the best part of the book. It is light-hearted, funny, vibrantly coloured. It is also the only story to which I would award 5 stars. 4 stars The Batman story could've gotten 5 stars if only ther had been more to it. It seems pretty sparse when compared with other stories that exploit the over-sized format to its fullest potential. Such stories include the Wonder Woman, the Metal Men, and the Flash. The Hawkman story was actually a lot of fun - I had noticed a certain trend in popular opinion on Goodreads that basically does not look favourably on Kyle Baker's contribution, so I was pleasantly surprised with this story. Superman and Metamorpho, as well as the 1-page bonus Plastic Man story round out the 4 stars category. 3 stars Green Lantern, Kamandi, Sgt. Rock, Adam Strange, Deadman, the team-up of The Demon & Catwoman . 2 stars The story starring the Teen Titans was interestingly rendered - almost like a cartoon, I'd say - but was utterly pointless. 1 measly star The 'bonus' 1-page [no-]story starring The Creeper, who I don't get or see the point of. Please, DC: do me a favour and just leave the crap out next time, m'kay?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Throughout the 30s, 40s, and 50s, adventure strips dominated the Sunday newspaper comics pages. Oversized, full color pages featured the thrilling tales of Prince Valiant, Tarzan, Flash Gordon, and countless others. Under the guidance of DC art director Mark Chiarello, Wednesday Comics successfully re-captured this lost era with a series of oversized weeklies à la the Sunday funnies (dubbed Wednesday rather than Sunday in honor of the day new comics arrive in stores). This beautiful 11"x17" 200-page h Throughout the 30s, 40s, and 50s, adventure strips dominated the Sunday newspaper comics pages. Oversized, full color pages featured the thrilling tales of Prince Valiant, Tarzan, Flash Gordon, and countless others. Under the guidance of DC art director Mark Chiarello, Wednesday Comics successfully re-captured this lost era with a series of oversized weeklies à la the Sunday funnies (dubbed Wednesday rather than Sunday in honor of the day new comics arrive in stores). This beautiful 11"x17" 200-page hardcover volume collects all the tales from the incredible 12-week run. While each featured A-list talent, some stories work better than others. Jack Kirby's creation Kamandi: The Last Boy on Earth (expertly rendered by writer Dave Gibbons and artist Ryan Sook); Paul Pope's unique take on Adam Strange; and especially Hawkman as delightfully envisioned by Kyle Baker lovingly embrace the format and lessons of their antecedents. Other excellent tales include writer Brian Azzarello's and artist Eduardo Risso's noir-infused Batman; the charming Silver Age style science fiction adventure of the Green Lantern (Kurt Busiek, writer and Joe Quiñones, art); the Karl Kerschi/Brenden Fletcher unique time travel take on The Flash; and an unusual team-up of The Demon and Catwoman (imagined by writer Walter Simonson and artist Brian Stelfreeze). Regardless of the story, one mood permeates the entire volume: fun. Combine all this with previously unpublished strips starring Plastic Man and Creeper, original sketches, and Chiarello's impressive book design, and Wednesday Comics quickly emerges as must-experience for all classic comic book fans.

  9. 4 out of 5

    J.

    This was a gloriously fantastic idea, and at the best of times, the huge size is magnificent for showcasing the art. That being said, the stories and art are incredibly inconsistent. The best stories, like Metamorpho, Flash, the Demon, and Supergirl, all have a significant hook--particularly the Supergirl story, which is hilarious, and the Flash, which is like some awesome episode of Twilight Zone. The Superman and Wonder Woman stories both have incredible art, but neither one has a particularly This was a gloriously fantastic idea, and at the best of times, the huge size is magnificent for showcasing the art. That being said, the stories and art are incredibly inconsistent. The best stories, like Metamorpho, Flash, the Demon, and Supergirl, all have a significant hook--particularly the Supergirl story, which is hilarious, and the Flash, which is like some awesome episode of Twilight Zone. The Superman and Wonder Woman stories both have incredible art, but neither one has a particularly amazing story. But too many of these stories or just passable--Green Lantern, Hawkman, Strange Adventures, Kamandi, Metal Men, and even Batman all look good in the big size, but the story isn't big or interesting enough to really warrant any real attention. And one of them--the Teen Titans story--is awful in every way: the story is a muddle with too many characters, and too much tie-in to the "real" comics world, and the art looks like a cartoon--which might be good, except the palette is so bland it makes you want to take a nap instead of reading it. Overall, a cool idea, but the writers (and a few of the artists) didn't really live up to the over-sized expectations. (Also, (and I didn't think I'd ever say this,) this book is too big. It's ungainly to read, and I dropped it a few times trying to prop it up in some way. But that's sort of inherent in the idea, I guess.)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nour

    Batman: He's like a freakin' black-widow-magnet assassinator! All the women in his life die. And yet I still find it hard to ever sympathise with the bat. Kamandi: Cute lions and tigers <3 Too much narration, didn't like the narrative style overall really. Superman: Cute but boring, I would have been more interested in a genuine crisis of faith and the human race. Tied up too nicely, though not predictable, I'll give it that. Deadman: I wanted more backstory, interesting concep Batman: He's like a freakin' black-widow-magnet assassinator! All the women in his life die. And yet I still find it hard to ever sympathise with the bat. Kamandi: Cute lions and tigers <3 Too much narration, didn't like the narrative style overall really. Superman: Cute but boring, I would have been more interested in a genuine crisis of faith and the human race. Tied up too nicely, though not predictable, I'll give it that. Deadman: I wanted more backstory, interesting concept, not interesting enough to make me google the character. Perhaps it was the emphasized accent and cliched protagonist vernacular. Green Lantern: Enjoyed the most, learnt about a superhero that wasn't particularly very high on my radar. Metamorpho: Neil Gaiman writing. What more could I say? Teen Titans: Meh. Strange Adventures: are strange. Supergirl: Aww Streaky and Krypto, best bit was when Streaky attacked the mouse. Metal Men: Too much happening in a short span of time, good though. Wonder Woman: Un-engaging. Sgt. Rock: Nice to see someone without superpowers for a change? The Flash: WHAT! The Demon and Catwoman: you know you're a lit student when the most amusing part of this comic was the iambic pentameter and the nod to Shakespeare. Hawkman: And so we flap! Because Dinosaur island exists, randomly. What am I saying? After all this, I'm being pedantic about dinos??

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This one was a mixed bag, but more good than bad. It has a pretty top notch group of creators. The idea was to recreate the old newspaper adventure comic strips, and this series were originally purposed as a series of tabloid sized newspapers. I read the hardcover, but I have to say I didn't care for the format. The book is HUGE, as in 14x20. It is supposed to the size of a tabloid newspaper, but it just seemed too awkward for me. I enjoyed most of the stories. I thought the weaker st This one was a mixed bag, but more good than bad. It has a pretty top notch group of creators. The idea was to recreate the old newspaper adventure comic strips, and this series were originally purposed as a series of tabloid sized newspapers. I read the hardcover, but I have to say I didn't care for the format. The book is HUGE, as in 14x20. It is supposed to the size of a tabloid newspaper, but it just seemed too awkward for me. I enjoyed most of the stories. I thought the weaker stories were Wonder Woman, Flash, Catwoman/Demon, and maybe Hawkman. The others were pretty strong. So overall, I did enjoy it, but I would have preferred to read it at standard comic size. Some people may like the bigger format, but I have heard mostly negative reactions. In any case, the stories did do a good job of capturing the old school adventure strip feel. The stories aren't the most cerebral (although Neil Gaiman did a great job at a Silver Age parody) but are still enjoyable.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Paul Pope's Strange Adventures was the best of the bunch!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    Fire everyone who isn't Paul Pope.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    DC Comics' inventive and imaginative Wednesday Comics is a mixed bag of stories and art but the general idea is pretty amazing. The throwback to old newspaper style pages was a treat although hard to physically handle at times (Its a HUGE book). There were some tremendous reads: Azzarello and Risso's Batman Gibbons and Sook's Kamandi Pope's Strange Adventures Palmiotti and Connor's Supergirl There were some that I couldn've done without: Arcudi and DC Comics' inventive and imaginative Wednesday Comics is a mixed bag of stories and art but the general idea is pretty amazing. The throwback to old newspaper style pages was a treat although hard to physically handle at times (Its a HUGE book). There were some tremendous reads: Azzarello and Risso's Batman Gibbons and Sook's Kamandi Pope's Strange Adventures Palmiotti and Connor's Supergirl There were some that I couldn've done without: Arcudi and Bermejo's Superman Gaiman and Allred's Metamorpho DiDio and Garcia-Lopez's Teen Titans Caldwell's Wonder Woman And of course there were tales in between. The overall book was such a unique event its hard to pass up. Really fun stuff.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steven Morton

    I am so glad I bought this in hardback.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Benzini

    Fantastic assortment of stories and art, in a great format

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ron Sadowski

    Read the original 12 issues serialization.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tom Malinowski

    For 12 consecutive weeks, DC released Wednesday Comics, a newspaper format featuring heroes such as Supergirl, Wonder Woman, The Flash, and more. Although comic books took over newspapers' telling of heroes, it's great to see a callback to the format, the formula, and the fun.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Keya

    A beautiful work of art and a must have for any serious comic fan. While you should be getting this for the art, the writing on most of the stories is nothing to scoff at. After reading this, even though it'd be ridiculous and unwieldy, I wish all comics were printed in this ultra large panel format. It really makes each panel something to marvel at. Anyways, enough with the gushing. Depending on your reading/art tastes your mileage will vary from story to story. My top picks were Supergirl, bot A beautiful work of art and a must have for any serious comic fan. While you should be getting this for the art, the writing on most of the stories is nothing to scoff at. After reading this, even though it'd be ridiculous and unwieldy, I wish all comics were printed in this ultra large panel format. It really makes each panel something to marvel at. Anyways, enough with the gushing. Depending on your reading/art tastes your mileage will vary from story to story. My top picks were Supergirl, both for Palmiotti and Gray's writing and Conner's art; Kamandi for the art mostly. The writing was solid, and even though it was in a Golden Age-y style, I was able to tolerate it, which is rare for me. Catwoman and The Demon, art was so-so, I mostly liked it because Selina was at her most sultry and I always like a good Etrigan cameo. Wonder Woman was visually interesting but that also hurt the narrative as it was really hard to follow at times and I didn't like the hundreds of panels on one page. Metal Men and Metamorpho were both a lot of fun. The Flash had some interesting bits. Everything else was decent. The only exceptions being Teen Titans and Hawkman. Though I usually like teen teams (See Kyle/Yost New X-men, Avengers Academny, etc) Teen Titans has always failed to hook me. This story was no different. It didn't help that I wasn't a fan of the art either. It wasn't horrible, but it definitely wasn't my cup of tea. Everything about Hawkman always pisses me off so that was doomed to disappoint. I hate his ridiculous origin, I didn't like the writing, I didn't like that his wife is Hawkgirl even though he's Hawkman. Shouldn't she be Hawkwoman by now? Womens Studies 101 guys, look into it. I get that it was probably supposed to be over the top camp but still. . . ugh. Just ugh. Way to save the worst story for last DC. But despite its shortcomings Wednesday Comics is a huge success in my book. I wish other comic companies would give these kinds of projects a shot.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    In 2009, McSweeney’s 33 was the San Francisco Panorama, a reminder that, once upon a time, newspapers were beautiful, expansive, and artistic. Included in this one-time edition was a sixteen-page comics section, full-size and glorious, hearkening back to Will Eisner’s Spirit heyday and featuring work by contemporary cartooning geniuses like Art Spiegelman and Dan Clowes. The McSweeney’s experiment may have been partly inspired by DC’s twelve-week Wednesday Comics event, which began in July of 2009 and was In 2009, McSweeney’s 33 was the San Francisco Panorama, a reminder that, once upon a time, newspapers were beautiful, expansive, and artistic. Included in this one-time edition was a sixteen-page comics section, full-size and glorious, hearkening back to Will Eisner’s Spirit heyday and featuring work by contemporary cartooning geniuses like Art Spiegelman and Dan Clowes. The McSweeney’s experiment may have been partly inspired by DC’s twelve-week Wednesday Comics event, which began in July of 2009 and was collected this year. Forget Marvel’s uninspired Siege or DC’s convoluted Blackest Night (which, in all fairness, is as fun as superheroes battling zombies in space can be, but it’s just indigestible without years of buildup and foreknowledge); this is the one capes-n-tights collection from twenty-ten that deserves to be on your bookshelf. Except you’re going to need a really tall shelf. For twelve Wednesdays, DC published a fifteen page comics “newspaper,” collecting stories of its more famous (and even lesser known) characters in a monumental 14 x 20 format. To make this project even more impressive, the artistic teams on the series were comprised of some of the most innovative and creative talents in the industry. There’s an Adam Strange story by Paul Pope, Batman by Azzarello and Risso (the team that brought us the crime classic 100 Bullets), and Metamorpho by Mike Allred and Neil Gaiman. The oversized format is a reminder that digital comics readers can’t (currently) hope to reproduce the effect of outstanding comics design: the art in the panels and the art of the panels, composed and executed in order to be appreciated simultaneously as individual story elements as well as one, unified piece of artwork.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This is an excellent collection, a really fun (and really big) book. It includes fifteen over-sized newspaper-style stories showcasing the best of DC. Surprisingly, some of the second-tier characters' stories are the ones that really stand out. The Batman, Demon & Catwoman, Deadman, and Superman were okay, and Hawkman, Green Lantern, and Flash were great. My two favorite books when I was very young were Metal Men and Sgt. Rock, and I particularly enjoyed seeing them again, especially a Rock This is an excellent collection, a really fun (and really big) book. It includes fifteen over-sized newspaper-style stories showcasing the best of DC. Surprisingly, some of the second-tier characters' stories are the ones that really stand out. The Batman, Demon & Catwoman, Deadman, and Superman were okay, and Hawkman, Green Lantern, and Flash were great. My two favorite books when I was very young were Metal Men and Sgt. Rock, and I particularly enjoyed seeing them again, especially a Rock drawn by Joe Kubert. There are excellent Kamandi and Adam Strange stories, and a really wild and funny mod Metamorpho written by Neil Gaiman. I didn't much care for the style of the Wonder Woman, which had too many verbage balloons and too many little tiny drawings in odd lines that made it very difficult to follow the continuity, or the Teen Titans, just because I don't like the modern cartoonish style of the art work. The Hal Foster/Carmine Infantino style of the Hawkman and Adam Strange stories in the current volume are more to my taste. Or the Kirby-styled Kamandi. I was prepared to dislike the Supergirl (it's what I would have labeled a -girl story- back in the day), but it's rendered with considerable charm and skill and I was most impressed with it. Skip the introduction and the one-page Plastic Man at the end and you'll have hours of old-time comics goodness!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Russell Grant

    First off, the book itself is a sight to behold. Oversized like nothing out there in order to keep the newspaper format, the quality of print and paper is ridiculous. It's entertaining just to flip through, never mind reading it. Thankfully for the most part, all the stories are up to the large format challenge. the odd thing is, it's the second tear characters that do better. Dave Gibbons take on KAMANDI is one of the best shorts I've ever seen. Nail Gaiman and Michael Allred experiment like cr First off, the book itself is a sight to behold. Oversized like nothing out there in order to keep the newspaper format, the quality of print and paper is ridiculous. It's entertaining just to flip through, never mind reading it. Thankfully for the most part, all the stories are up to the large format challenge. the odd thing is, it's the second tear characters that do better. Dave Gibbons take on KAMANDI is one of the best shorts I've ever seen. Nail Gaiman and Michael Allred experiment like crazy with METAMORPHO, I can't imagine someone picking this up and not being mostly pleased. That's being said with the full admittance that I hated the Wonder Woman story that was such a confusing mess I bailed on it half way through. Amazing job this was, and it's one of the few projects like this that I wouldn't mind seeing a volume two of. Highly recommended. A

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Shafer

    The Good Superman: The story was fun and even if it wasn't lee Berejmo's art makes everything worthwile. Green lantern: was cool to go back to early Hal Jordan style for a bit. Teen titans: the art in here rocked and its always fun to see the brother routine from the Robins. Supergirl: Krypto. Nuff said. The flash: The comic within a comic style was cool. The Bad Batman: Confusing , and that last section was just EW. Metamorpho: The art was less than The Good Superman: The story was fun and even if it wasn't lee Berejmo's art makes everything worthwile. Green lantern: was cool to go back to early Hal Jordan style for a bit. Teen titans: the art in here rocked and its always fun to see the brother routine from the Robins. Supergirl: Krypto. Nuff said. The flash: The comic within a comic style was cool. The Bad Batman: Confusing , and that last section was just EW. Metamorpho: The art was less than good and the story tried to hard to be funny and also seemed to rely on knowing things about metamorphos history which doesn't work for this format. Demon and catwoman: Not nessacary , strange combination Deadman: Cool Character , uncool story Adam Strange: Forgettable Wonder woman: never been a character i liked so with the bad art and the first page not grabbing my attention i stopped reading. the other stories were fairly mediocre but the good stories make this book worthwhile.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    I was ambivalent the minute I heard about this experiment. The generation that fondly remembers the Sunday comic section as the most exciting entertainment all week outgrew comics around 1940. Harkening back to the days of yesteryear with newspaper comics had mistake written all over it, formatwise. And that was a shame because some of the art in this book was to die for. I'm a fan of standardization. Take lightbulbs for example: How would you like to have different manufacturers come up with a I was ambivalent the minute I heard about this experiment. The generation that fondly remembers the Sunday comic section as the most exciting entertainment all week outgrew comics around 1940. Harkening back to the days of yesteryear with newspaper comics had mistake written all over it, formatwise. And that was a shame because some of the art in this book was to die for. I'm a fan of standardization. Take lightbulbs for example: How would you like to have different manufacturers come up with a different style of screw thread, or snap fittings, all for a silly lightbulb -- it would drive you nuts. Similarly, I like standard dimensions of paperbacks, magazines, comics and graphic novels too. It just makes life easier. Every time I encounter an odd-shaped comic, I wonder where the hell I'm supposed to fit it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    A glorious, though only partly successful experiment. The format resembles the sunday comics and the stories are written to fit that. Most work and the rest are Batman and Wonder Woman. A wide range of artists and writers make this a interesting mix of stories and styles. The writers capable of being old school fare the best. The writers that came from the generation of writing for the trade really come across as almost unable to write a short story. The pictures A glorious, though only partly successful experiment. The format resembles the sunday comics and the stories are written to fit that. Most work and the rest are Batman and Wonder Woman. A wide range of artists and writers make this a interesting mix of stories and styles. The writers capable of being old school fare the best. The writers that came from the generation of writing for the trade really come across as almost unable to write a short story. The pictures are big and colorful, the stories are fun and old school and reminds you of what comics should be at their core. Plus, it gave me a nice warm fuzzy feel of nostalgia for visiting my grandparents and finding they'd saved us kids a big pile of sunday funnies to read in one lump sitting. Shame they never did a second try at this.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    The first experiment, releasing these stories in twelve newspaper installments, was fun and different. And then the decision to reprint them as complete stories in their original size was downright brilliant. As both an anthology and a beautiful showcase of the hottest artists of the day, it works exceptionally well. There are a few mediocre entries (most notably the Teen Titans one, which I had to force myself through) but the vast majority live up to the high expectations the unusual format di The first experiment, releasing these stories in twelve newspaper installments, was fun and different. And then the decision to reprint them as complete stories in their original size was downright brilliant. As both an anthology and a beautiful showcase of the hottest artists of the day, it works exceptionally well. There are a few mediocre entries (most notably the Teen Titans one, which I had to force myself through) but the vast majority live up to the high expectations the unusual format dictates. A few use the space particularly well, Gaiman's and Allred's Metamorpho and Bullock's and Heuck's Deadman. I have the individual issues and read a library copy of the hardcover, but it looks like slightly used copies are available for a reasonable price on Amazon. I think it's worth owning in addition to the newspaper issues.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Kline

    A solid collection of newspaper-style comics. Each comic was done by a different artist and there is a wide range of characters. As with most such compilations, there will be some hits and misses. I could not follow and could barely read the Wonder Woman comic. I'm not familiar with Deadman, Sgt. Rock, or the Metal Men, and their stories didn't do much to peek my interest. I mostly bought the collection for Lee Bermejo's art in the Superman story, which was very good. I would recommen A solid collection of newspaper-style comics. Each comic was done by a different artist and there is a wide range of characters. As with most such compilations, there will be some hits and misses. I could not follow and could barely read the Wonder Woman comic. I'm not familiar with Deadman, Sgt. Rock, or the Metal Men, and their stories didn't do much to peek my interest. I mostly bought the collection for Lee Bermejo's art in the Superman story, which was very good. I would recommend this for DC fans, it just didn't blow me away. Also, the size makes it difficult to read comfortably and even harder to shelve.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Originally presented as a 12 issue weekly series featuring 15 different stories, one page devoted to each story every week. The format was that of a newspaper, the collected version is an over sized book. I'm not crazy about either format. My favorite out of the 15 was the Flash story. Other than that, the rest were mediocre, including Batman and Superman. Some of the stories didn't do a real good job at capturing the serialized format, the way daily comics do in the newspaper. It really was a g Originally presented as a 12 issue weekly series featuring 15 different stories, one page devoted to each story every week. The format was that of a newspaper, the collected version is an over sized book. I'm not crazy about either format. My favorite out of the 15 was the Flash story. Other than that, the rest were mediocre, including Batman and Superman. Some of the stories didn't do a real good job at capturing the serialized format, the way daily comics do in the newspaper. It really was a gimmick of an idea, and nothing more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Don

    The idea was better then the execution. Most of the strips were average, at best. Only two of the fifteen strips that made the final cut ("Metamorpho" and "The Flash") took successful advantage of the over-sized format and one ("Wonder Woman") was almost unreadable. They weren't all bad, though. I enjoyed "Kamandi" quite a bit. The aforementioned "Metemorpho" was good. "Supergirl" was fun. However, overall, the book is just kind of standard superhero stuff.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lunchboxavenger

    Some amazing stories in here. I will ignore the Superman and Teen Titans for the sake of the score. Those two subtract a star each for the disappointment. Most notable are the Adam Strange and Hawkman stories. The Green Lantern one is a an excellent golden age era tale. The Wonder Woman set is a good story hampered by over eager layouts, if you aren't comfortable with the visual language of comics then this one will frustrate.

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