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Lisey's Story by Stephen King Unabridged CD Audiobook..

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Unabridged CD Audiobook 16 CDs / 19 hours long


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Unabridged CD Audiobook 16 CDs / 19 hours long

30 review for Lisey's Story by Stephen King Unabridged CD Audiobook..

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Sparks

    It's a "love story" done "Stephen King" style and so perfectly done that my first thought after finishing was to read the novel a second time. The characters are so genuine and universal that everyone will love them, and the story is both magical and heart-breaking at exactly the same time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adrianne

    All I can say is that getting to the last page was a relief. Reading this novel was like staring at a cow for five hours.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “I loved you then and I love you now and I have loved you every second in between." This is a book about Lisey Landon, the widow of a famous author, Scott Landon. There are two main stories within the book - that of Lisey's story in the present, and that of her dead husband's life. Lisey is clearing out her husband's writing space in their home which leads to a series of events that force her to recall memories and realities about her late husband. I loved this book. And I mean LOVED it. Initiall “I loved you then and I love you now and I have loved you every second in between." This is a book about Lisey Landon, the widow of a famous author, Scott Landon. There are two main stories within the book - that of Lisey's story in the present, and that of her dead husband's life. Lisey is clearing out her husband's writing space in their home which leads to a series of events that force her to recall memories and realities about her late husband. I loved this book. And I mean LOVED it. Initially, I found it quite hard to get into, but I kept at it and it has really paid off. For me, it hits close to home. The messages it sends about grief and getting over the loss of a loved one really rang true for myself. So many parts of the book just caused me to reread the same section over and over, finding comfort in the fact that we all experience those same feelings. "Sometimes she'd go a whole day without thinking of him or missing him. Why not? She had quite a full life, and really, he'd often been hard to deal with and hard to live with. A project, the Yankee old times like her very own Dad might have said. And then sometimes a day would come, a gray one (or a sunny one) when she missed him so fiercely she felt empty, not a woman at all anymore but just a dead tree filled with cold November blow. She felt like that now, felt like hollering his name and hollering him home, and her heart turned sick with the thought of the years ahead and she wondered what good love was if it came to this, to even ten seconds of feeling like this." It also speaks strongly about marriage, and the emotional complexities that make up a long marriage. At times it felt like I wasn't sure if Lisey and Scott even liked each other, but this often appears to be the case with marriage - it's not all sunshine and rainbows. Their love was still there and their love was strong. The snippets into Scott's childhood were another highlight. Harrowing and heartfelt and heartbreaking and scary... The relationship between him and his father and his brother was so well written. I felt so emotionally invested in these parts of the story. We also delve deeply into the relationship that Lisey has with her sisters, which is truly fascinating. It's an odd book in that it seems that King fans either love this book or hate it, and thankfully I am one of the former. This has been a true pleasure. I already can't wait to reread this one. Edit: Reread in November 2018 and loved it even more than the first time! Now number 4 in my list of top King books.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Lisey Debusher Landon is the widow of Scott Landon, the Stephen King stand-in here, an author who achieved fame in his early 20’s and never let go, soon becoming and then remaining a best-selling novelist. King weaves several time lines, Landon’s bizarre childhood and his relationship with his father and brother, the courtship of Landon and Lisey, an assassination attempt on Landon by a psycho, Landon’s later illness, and the present. Lisey, two years after Scott’s death, is still tidying up his Lisey Debusher Landon is the widow of Scott Landon, the Stephen King stand-in here, an author who achieved fame in his early 20’s and never let go, soon becoming and then remaining a best-selling novelist. King weaves several time lines, Landon’s bizarre childhood and his relationship with his father and brother, the courtship of Landon and Lisey, an assassination attempt on Landon by a psycho, Landon’s later illness, and the present. Lisey, two years after Scott’s death, is still tidying up his affairs, beset by a scholarly pair from a university with their greedy paws eager for his accumulated notes and unpublished writings. Her relationship with Scott is paralleled by her relationship with her siblings, three sisters, one of whom is seriously deranged, and falls into catatonia after an emotional blow. A present day psycho seeks her out and forces Lisey to confront some repressed knowledge, about Landon and herself. There is much in here about personal use of language. Lisey uses “smuck” instead of the usual four letter expletive, behavior learned from Scott. The word “bool” figures prominently as well. There are many sayings that probably originated in King’s Maine background. He adds to these, giving the piece some texture. He also fills the mouths of the tale’s psychos with a bit of verbal drool that is never explained. How explain madness? There are many instances in which King parallels/echoes images across scenes, noting the state of at least two pairs of underpants, faces smeared with blood that resemble clowns. There are repeated mentions of stations of the cross, although it is never really clear that the connection is that deep. The story is engaging. Too long of course, but what can one do? King gets in his writing about children under stress, a favorite pastime of his. There is otherworldly material here as well that requires willing suspension of disbelief. But this is Stephen King after all. Does one really expect such to be absent? I enjoyed reading the book. The texture was fun, the references to other artists, musicians, writers. It was not scary the way some of his books have been. I will have no nightmares as a result of reading Lisey’s Story. It is a good read, not a great one. A few other King Family items I have reviewed by Stephen King The Shining Doctor Sleep Under the Dome Duma Key Revival by Joe Hill NOS4A2 The Fireman 20th Century Ghosts Heart-Shaped Box

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Reading this makes me think of all the literary critics Stephen King has had to put up with over the years. If a reader does not like his writing, that’s fine, “to each his own” as the saying goes. I’ve been on the outside looking in and in the minority opinion plenty of times, but I can usually see how someone could like a work, or even more frequently, respect the hard work that went in to creating a published book. Some of Stephen King’s critics have been nasty, defaming not only his writing a Reading this makes me think of all the literary critics Stephen King has had to put up with over the years. If a reader does not like his writing, that’s fine, “to each his own” as the saying goes. I’ve been on the outside looking in and in the minority opinion plenty of times, but I can usually see how someone could like a work, or even more frequently, respect the hard work that went in to creating a published book. Some of Stephen King’s critics have been nasty, defaming not only his writing ability but his intelligence. I won’t state names and I won’t repeat the rubbish, but it is frequently pathetic. Like a spoiled kid crying sour grapes because he’s jealous. Easy for a literature type or academic to play the high castle card, ridiculing King and his success for appealing to the masses, for selling out, for playing upon the lowest common denominator. This was exceptionally well written. King’s prose is clear and imaginative, his style is progressive and resonant with emotion. This is a romance, but a gothic, melancholy novel, full of loss and grief and longing. There is magic realism that touches on fantasy of the Bradbury kind, close to the earth and yet fleeting and peripheral. Apparently, when King was hit by a car and almost died, in the late 90s, he returned home during his convalescence to see his books and personal items packed up in boxes, having been rearranged by his wife Tabitha. This made him think of what his office would look like after he was dead, with Tabby given the unenviable task of going through her famous husband’s papers. Lisey Landon was the surviving wife of famous novelist Scott Landon. As the story begins, he has been dead some two years or so. Much of the narrative is internal monologue and remembrances of Lisey’s happier times with her husband. But like all marriages, they had good and bad times and like many creative people, her late husband was a complicated man and with some dark secrets with which to contend. He was haunted by elements of his past and his family was a torturous and dysfunctional type, the kind of childhood that was survived rather than treasured and enjoyed. When Lisey is confronted with an insane man who wants Scott’s old manuscripts and notes, she is forced to endure a present nightmare while also compelled to relive some of her darker times with Scott. Psychologically terrifying in a domestic setting, King has demonstrated his great range as a writer. This is unlike any other book of his I have read and interestingly, King has stated this is his favorite. It is noteworthy that the book is dedicated to Tabby and is memorable that the narrative is filled with terms of endearment and with love language between the two. Every couple has their own ways of communicating, some in code and some without saying anything at all. Whether partially autobiographical or not, King has provided an unguarded glimpse into the life and love of two people who have shared and loved and then gone on ahead apart, divided by that singular loneliness that will come for each of us. Romantic and at times heartbreaking, this is still Stephen King and fans will find his horrific magic present and engaging. Though not one of my favorites, I can see where someone would love this book and I can certainly respect his great talent.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Kuhn

    “She would have thought two years was enough time for the strangeness to rub off, but it wasn’t; time apparently did nothing but blunt grief’s sharpest edge so that it hacked rather than sliced.” In an interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Stephen King named “Lisey’s Story” as the best book he ever wrote. It’s a deeply personal story with a passionate marriage providing a strong anchor at its core, which King pulls from his relationship with his wife Tabitha. But, it’s also covers a wide range o “She would have thought two years was enough time for the strangeness to rub off, but it wasn’t; time apparently did nothing but blunt grief’s sharpest edge so that it hacked rather than sliced.” In an interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Stephen King named “Lisey’s Story” as the best book he ever wrote. It’s a deeply personal story with a passionate marriage providing a strong anchor at its core, which King pulls from his relationship with his wife Tabitha. But, it’s also covers a wide range of themes including grief, addiction, child abuse, and even mental instability. He wrote this story after overcoming his additions in the ‘80s and his near life ending accident in 1999, when he was struck by a Van on a walk. His wife took time during his recovery to redecorate his office. Seeing his manuscripts and effects packed away, was part of the inspiration of this novel. This is not an easy read and the first third requires considerable concentration. The story follows a widow, Lisey Landon, after the untimely death of her husband, Scott Landon. Scott was a critically acclaimed novelist and King leverages a bit of obscure literary references to set the stage. We are also introduced to the internal language of Lisey and Scott, which is even more confusing due to references to repressed supernatural events. However, the vague references of past events, become all the more satisfying as the story plays out. Once again, King’s ability to make the supernatural believable is fully on display in this novel. He not only creates his own slang, but the motivation, dialog, and actions are incredibly well thought out. King is at the top of his game in terms of vocabulary, imagery, and storytelling. “By then the whole world had slowed down, and what she kept returning to—as the tongue keeps returning to the surface of a badly chipped tooth—was how utter smooth that movement had been, as if the gun had been mounted on a gimbal.” But what really differentiates “Lisey’s Story”, from many of his prior works, is how deep we get into the thoughts and feeling of the MC. This novel is short on dialog and the first half is even short on action. What we do get is way down deep into Lisey’s thinking and her relationships. We get exposed to her inner most thoughts, and the book isn’t even first-person narration. It’s this deep dig into her grief, her fight to deal with a reality that is on the edge of insanity, that makes this novel so special. I can't imagine the intensity of thought it took King to write this novel (and also in the same vein - Gerald's Game). I wonder if King had dropped the supernatural from this book, if he would have replaced it with pure addiction and mental instability, while keeping the rest of the storyline, if he would have had a real literary masterpiece that his critics could not ignore. I know King does not care about his critics, nor do I, but it would have been an interesting experiment in how the book was received and how it sold. In the end, I’m glad he stayed true to himself, as it’s a perfect Stephen King novel. He makes the unbelievable believable and connects you to characters in a way few others can. He takes you to a place that we all drink from, and can be as beautiful or as horrifying as we imagine. This is a Stephen King masterpiece.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    It started out fairly well. Youngish widow going through her brilliant writer husband's papers...maybe it was a thinly veiled biography of King's wife Tabitha? Maybe it would be good. Its initial promise wore thin after about the 70th time the word "smucking" appeared. After about the 5th time the main character called her sister "Manda Bunny", the promise was not only rubbed off the book, it was replaced with a bit of sandpaper that grated directly against your nerves. Stephen King could have do It started out fairly well. Youngish widow going through her brilliant writer husband's papers...maybe it was a thinly veiled biography of King's wife Tabitha? Maybe it would be good. Its initial promise wore thin after about the 70th time the word "smucking" appeared. After about the 5th time the main character called her sister "Manda Bunny", the promise was not only rubbed off the book, it was replaced with a bit of sandpaper that grated directly against your nerves. Stephen King could have done wonderful things with this book if he'd not immediately become cloying (Gott in Himmel, how many times did we need to be reminded that Lisey, the main character, and her husband Scott, the brilliant writer, had catch phrases and inside jokes and used the word "smuck" instead of the more satisfying F word? I'd guess at least once every page). When King tried to bring a somewhat realistic and on its own meaty story (meaty because a story about what the surviving spouse of a luminary goes through after the spouse's death is an interesting story enough, not to mention the meatiness of the mental illnesses he sort of wrote about, like self mutilation and catatonia) into the realm of the supernatural, he didn't seem to be trying too hard. Booya moon? Whatever. King is ever readable, and the book wasn't without its charms, but it could have been so much more. It could have been a masterpiece, given the theme and given the talent of the writer, who somehow compelled me to finish this treacly mess.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    Major bomb. & actually strikingly pretentious as well! The search for anything salvageable in this junkyard is an impossible task. You owe it to yourself, invest your time on something better. May possibly tie for worst Stephen King novel with "Insomnia." Or "The Tommyknockers..."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jamieson

    As I read Lisey’s Story by Stephen King, I am reminded why I love King’s work so much. It is constantly changing, constantly evolving. Each book is a different experiment. Each book is a different tale; yet no two are the same. King has gone beyond the horror genre with Lisey’s Story and written a, dare I say it, literary masterpiece. Its part horror, part love story, part tribute to a woman’s husband. It’s part creepshow, part romance and absolutely unclassifiable. King has written a novel that, As I read Lisey’s Story by Stephen King, I am reminded why I love King’s work so much. It is constantly changing, constantly evolving. Each book is a different experiment. Each book is a different tale; yet no two are the same. King has gone beyond the horror genre with Lisey’s Story and written a, dare I say it, literary masterpiece. Its part horror, part love story, part tribute to a woman’s husband. It’s part creepshow, part romance and absolutely unclassifiable. King has written a novel that, while hard to classify, has a heart that beats at its centre.I keep wanting to speed forward while reading Lisey’s Story. Normally, when I read a Stephen King book, I can zip through it in two to three days; regardless of size. I just can’t do that with this one, the words won’t let me. King’s prose is so beautiful, so melodic, it’s impossible to speed through, it’s impossible to read as fast as I normally do.It feels like I’m drinking in the words, drinking in the story. It feels like I’m dancing with Lisey, floating through her flashbacks, her dealings with Zack McCool. But the dance has a dark edge to it, as if my partner will drop me on the floor and trod on me with sharp heeled shoes at any moment. I keep waiting for the other shoe to drop, or the bottom to fall out.Because I know it’s coming. In the end, no matter how beautiful the novel is, I know it’s a Stephen King novel and that something grim is going on, something darker is waiting at the edges of my vision for it’s turn to float onto the page like a dark shadow. It’s just a matter of waiting for it, wading my way through Kings most literary effort yet, and waiting for the monster to show its face. I don’t understand the many negative reviews for Lisey’s Story. I just don’t get it. This novel is beautiful, heartbreaking and mesmerizing; what’s not to like? I think those who don’t like it are just expecting King to shovel out one more horror book after another; they don’t want to give him a chance to try anything different, anything beautiful. To the naysayer’s, I say: read it again. Take off the blinders and slip into Boo’ya Moon. Your stay will be far more enjoyable with an open mind and a heart that bleeds.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I've been reading a lot of "New" Stephen King lately, books that I've put off reading because I was afraid that they would not be as good as "Old" Stephen King. I wish I had not, because while "New" King is different, he is still The King. I listened to it on audio, but kind of followed along in the book too, sort of. Mare Winningham did a good job reading, and after a while I got used to her voices, although I think that she added a bit too much to the story. She made certain characters sound t I've been reading a lot of "New" Stephen King lately, books that I've put off reading because I was afraid that they would not be as good as "Old" Stephen King. I wish I had not, because while "New" King is different, he is still The King. I listened to it on audio, but kind of followed along in the book too, sort of. Mare Winningham did a good job reading, and after a while I got used to her voices, although I think that she added a bit too much to the story. She made certain characters sound too much alike for my taste, specifically Jim Dooley, Sparky Landon and Amanda Debusher. Amanda was different because she was given a more feminine voice, and no "hillbilly" at all, but the underlying voice was the same, and that bothered me. Anyway, moving on to the story itself. I wasn't sure what to make of this book when I started it, but I absolutely loved it. Dark and creepy, this one actually gave me goosebumps in a few spots. Listening to the events in Scott's childhood cellar were one of those times. To be honest, that part was scarier to me than the Longboy. I also found the running theme on mental illness interesting. King always has a slightly skewed way of viewing the world, and I thought it was perfectly fitting that he should describe mental illness the way he did in this book. Not as something internal, but as something external, either worming it's way into you, or by calling you to it... and then keeping you there. But even with all the creepiness, this was really a beautiful story of love and loyalty and trust and acceptance. And sacrifice. A friend of mine mentioned that she felt it was a love letter from King to his wife. I can understand that, but there is a lot more to this story than that. My book has the tagline, "Their love was just the first chapter", and I think that's perfectly fitting for how I viewed this book. This book is like a patchwork quilt of King's appreciation for the things that got him where he is today. Tabitha King is definitely at the head of that list, but she's by far not the only recipient of a tip of King's hat. His description of the Longboy, and of Boo'ya Moon in general reminded me strongly of H.P. Lovecraft's writing. Not just his atrocious beastly creations, but also Lovecraft's theory that sometimes what's left unseen and unexplained is far scarier than explained phenomena, regardless of how awful it may be. In this, I felt like King was paying homage to what he grew up reading. He also makes reference to his own creations, Derry, Castle Rock (which in itself is a homage to William Golding's "Lord of the Flies"), Dark Score Lake, Norris Ridgewick, and of course, there were several ties to the Dark Tower and The Talisman, specifically the phrase "Light out for the territories". Scott's ability to "boom" to Boo'ya Moon is reminiscent of Jack's ability to shift from the Territories to this world in "The Talisman". All in all, I really enjoyed this story. I look forward to King's next book. I will certainly not put it off as I did this one and "Duma Key". BOOL! The End.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J.C.

    Smucking smucking oh my god so much smmmmuckkking!! Do you know what i mean, babyluv? Can you feel this smucking annoyance towards this smucking book? Sure you can. Every great artist produces a smucking turd every now and again. Smuck the smuckers who think everything has to be so smucking perfect all the smucking time. annoyed at all the smuckings? Yeah me too. Try reading 300+ pages of that plus other made-up language that repeats itself in almost EVERY paragraph. To be honest, the last 200 pa Smucking smucking oh my god so much smmmmuckkking!! Do you know what i mean, babyluv? Can you feel this smucking annoyance towards this smucking book? Sure you can. Every great artist produces a smucking turd every now and again. Smuck the smuckers who think everything has to be so smucking perfect all the smucking time. annoyed at all the smuckings? Yeah me too. Try reading 300+ pages of that plus other made-up language that repeats itself in almost EVERY paragraph. To be honest, the last 200 pages I did a lot of skipping. So I cheated, sue me. I honestly didn't care for the characters or the plot, it was not what i thought it was at all. Not only that but I honestly didnt get Scott and lisey's relationship at all, they never seemed real to me. Which is weird cause usually King's characters are fantastic and well developed. Here, not so much. Throughout the whole book I just kept thinking "ok, why is she doing that?" or "ok so now we're in the past-oh wait this is the future! no its the present....but then why is he there?" I understand Scott is some kind of ghost but...WHY!? Maybe I'm just not imaginative enough to understand. But seriously, this book confused me. I didn't understand any of the characters, and honestly I never got attached to any of them enough to care. And they all seemed so MANIC. Seriously, Lisey and everyone else all seemed seriously crazy, talking to themselves or figures of their imagination or cutting themselves. The only cahracters that seemed different were the sheriffs and deputies of the story, and all of them seemed quite stoic and by-the-book stereotypes. Which, considering King's previous work, is seriously surprising to me, almost to the point of shock. So I gave this turd two stars. Every great artist deserves some slack (King even says so in his "Author's Statement" at the end of the book), and King certainly deserves that much.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This book was selected for my NJ Bookclub because it has similar themes to our last read, Bag of Bones. I've previously read this one, or listened, because it was an audiobook, and so this time I read-read it. I loved the experience of the audio - the reader is great and the audio definitely brings the story to life in different ways than the text itself does, but reading this with my very own eyeballs is rewarding in its own way. First, it's a more active, involved experience. Audio is very pas This book was selected for my NJ Bookclub because it has similar themes to our last read, Bag of Bones. I've previously read this one, or listened, because it was an audiobook, and so this time I read-read it. I loved the experience of the audio - the reader is great and the audio definitely brings the story to life in different ways than the text itself does, but reading this with my very own eyeballs is rewarding in its own way. First, it's a more active, involved experience. Audio is very passive, right? You can listen while you multi-task, and it will go on without you if you get distracted or zone out or fall asleep. But reading this required me to really be present in the moment and in the story, and especially the writing, so I noticed things that I hadn't (or had and then forgot) the first time around. For instance, the writing. This is a very... flowy book. It's structured in such a way that the past and the present and memories and dreams are kind of intertwined and flow into and around each other. (Which I guess is what intertwined means. Whatever.) The writing will just kind of end, no punctuation or completion, and pick up in the next segment or section with a continuation from a different perspective or in memory or in a different time. It shifts between past tense and present tense and 3rd person limited and 3rd person omniscient, and all storylines and times and perspectives meld together. So you have to keep up to know where and when you are in the story... or maybe don't and just go with it. In the text, as I'm not usually a header reader, my eye just naturally skips the breaks and continues on. It's not the same kind of unbroken narrative as say, Cujo, which would have definitely benefited from some segmentation, but it almost feels as though it is at times. It has a kind of pseudo-stream of consciousness mixed with magical realism feel that works for the story, without feeling annoyingly tedious as I usually find both SOC and MR to be. So, good job there, King. But another thing that I noticed is that there are a lot of connections and links to his previous work, meaning his stories, characters, and themes, and to his own life. This is both good and bad. Someone who is very familiar with King's work might feel that it is either self-derivative or chock full of fun easter eggs and connections, depending on how charitable they are feeling at the time. I can see it both ways, but I tend to lean more toward the charitable side and I can enjoy the influences his previous work had on this story. For instance, for me, Andrew Landon had undertones of Mark Torrance (Jack's father) from The Shining. That he was cognizant of his abuse and had, in his mind or in reality, a reason for it, makes him a more understandable and relateable character for me, but I couldn't help making that connection because of the very similar feels of the characters when they were in their hectoring rages, and especially given the love that their sons both held for the men who hurt them and their family members. Lisey, though VERY different from her, had a bit of Dolores Claiborne in her nature, if only the stubbornness and backbone to wade through fire to help the people she loves. Lisey and Dolores don't have much else in common, but that stalwart quality makes up for a lot. We talked about Lisey a bit at my bookclub meeting last night, and it was pointed out that Lisey is one of the few women that King has written who doesn't really DO anything. She doesn't really have her own thing - she's purely there to be a support system for her sister, and then later her husband. And even after he's gone, she still does nothing but exist until she starts to clean out his office, and then the floodgates open and things start happening that makes her act accordingly. But, she's not a philanthropist, she doesn't volunteer, she's not on committees or boards or even have any hobbies that I can tell. She's really just something of a shim - the piece that holds something else stable and in place. Scott Landon had a bit of Jack Sawyer and Mike Noonan and King himself, and even though we never get to see Scott while he's alive (outside of flashbacks and memories), he is one of my favorite characters. His history and his story, and his methods of coping and adapting and his refusal to carry on the cycle of this madness, is commendable. I found myself often wishing that I could just give him a hug and comfort him, because he lived through so much hurt and pain. It made me feel a bit better that he found happiness and support and understanding in Lisey, even IF she had nothing outside of that role. That sentence probably sets the woman's lib and feminism movements back about a bazillion years, but I'm not sorry about it, and I'm not taking it back. He is such a tragic character that I'm happy he got to be happy for a while. Anyway, I'm rambling on now. What I'm getting at is that while I can see how he borrowed bits from his previous characters, I liked it more than not. I really liked how the story was actually plotted around Amanda (even though it's not MUCH of a plot, if I'm honest) while it's the history of Scott's life and Scott and Lisey's marriage that actually helps her recover. I loved the interactions of the sisters and how real and fucked up they were. Their names bugged the hell out of me, though. Jodotha? Cantata? Darlanna? Amanda's daughter Intermezzo? And Good Ma (mother) and Dandy (father)? Who would call their parents that? Weird. I still found the most creepy and disturbing scenes to be Scott's history of his father and brother, and they were, if anything, more heartbreaking this time around. It was easy for me to put myself in the place of a little boy having to deal with this stuff - trying to help someone who was into the bad-gunky, and I am somewhat in awe of the fact that he made it through and managed to move past it, while living with it. The concept of belief vs reality, or even of belief SHAPING reality is a strong one in this book. Boo'ya Moon is a kind of canvas place which seems to both exist on its own and yet also be whatever it is needed to be. It's got a dual nature just like everything else. In the light, it's healing and calm and something of a relaxing retreat.... but when darkness falls, it turns malevolent and threatening. Even in its lighter nature, it's dangerous though. Too much of a good thing always is. Boo'ya Moon is like the rooms that many of King's characters retreat to in their own minds to protect their innermost thoughts and selves from outside threats. But in this case, it's a real, or real enough, place that can actually hide and protect physically as well as only mentally when needed. Though the question of whether it's really real, or if it's only manifested because of expectation - shared delusion? - is one that I can't answer. This book is definitely one that makes me think - about the nature of love and how much of oneself it is safe to give to another, and how far we will go to help those we love. It was asked last night whether we, at the bookclub, would have stayed with someone like Scott. I had to think about it for a bit, but not long. If the fantastical element (Boo'ya Moon and the bad-gunky, etc) were removed, and it was just mental illness, would the question still be asked? I'd like to think not. We love who we love, and in doing so we accept them, flaws and all, and we help battle through the hard shit together. We become two.

  13. 5 out of 5

    joyce g

    A love story. A Stephen King love story. Curious what color is your pool?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    I have such a love/hate relationship with this book. For one, it's full of twice-used ideas. Everything you find inside Lisey's Story is taken part and parcel from other King novels. The idea of being haunted by a spouse and one half of the marriage being an author is Bag of Bones to a Tee. You have the lush other world just beyond ours that is wonderful during the day, and horrible after dark, via Rose Madder. Then you have the character of "Zack McCool" who is John Shooter from "Secret Window, I have such a love/hate relationship with this book. For one, it's full of twice-used ideas. Everything you find inside Lisey's Story is taken part and parcel from other King novels. The idea of being haunted by a spouse and one half of the marriage being an author is Bag of Bones to a Tee. You have the lush other world just beyond ours that is wonderful during the day, and horrible after dark, via Rose Madder. Then you have the character of "Zack McCool" who is John Shooter from "Secret Window, Secret Garden" mixed with shadows of Annie Wilkes of Misery. It's one of the only novels wherein King steals heavily from himself. He's borrowed from numerous authors over his four-plus-decade career, but this time he's riding the Dean Koontz train into Repeatsville. If it's possible to plagiarize yourself, King does so in this novel. This and this alone is why I couldn't see rating the book five stars. With that being said, you're unlikely to find a better written King novel. I understand why it's King's personal favorite. But that doesn't mean I can ignore the blatant repetition. So what is a reviewer to do? This time around, I'm going with style over content. King's prose is gorgeous here, even moreso than in Bag of Bones, and that's saying something. There are entire chapters worth quoting, and King himself will tell you that's unlike him. He's been honest in the past about how he sometimes awkwardly stumbles and powers through scenes with sheer dumb will, and that's putting it nicely. Lisey's Story, while being your typical King novel content wise, is a beautiful product conceived by a man who has spent almost half a century publicly honing his craft. It has all the staples of a terrific King novel: the horror, the unfailing heart, and the uncanny ability the author possesses of writing believable and flawed women. My favorite part of this novel is early on, it is, truth be told, the only reason I finished the book the first time around, back when it came out in 2006. I will admit that the book is never quite as good, story wise, as it is during the scene wherein Scott is shot. Yes, the story is a struggle after that, mainly because it hops around through time like Bugs Bunny and Doctor Who's hyperactive love child. You must pay close attention in the later chapters or risk being left in King's dust. Still, these flashbacks and flash forwards and returns to present are touching and, at times, utterly heart rending. Scott's death (it's in the synopsis that he's dead, so I don't consider that information a spoiler) is probably the strongest-written section in the entire book. For this reread, I decided on the audiobook narrated by Mare Winningham. If you dig audiobooks, I highly recommend you do the same. She especially excels at performing Young Scott. If you click on "view spoiler", you should know that there are spoilers for other King novels aside from this one. What you will get if you clickety-clack that spoilery button are this book's tie ins to other King novels, and a conspiracy theory regarding Boo-ya Moon. (view spoiler)[ Conspiracy theory: I believe that Boo'ya Moon is the same place Mrs. Todd disappears to in the short story "Mrs. Todd's Shortcut." I also believe it's the same world Rose escapes into in Rose Madder. Of course all these places are part of the same multiverse, one that I call the King-verse. They are all simply different stops on different beams along the path to the Dark Tower. Tie ins: Andy Clutterbuck, the guy who took over for Alan Pangborn as sheriff of Castle County, makes an appearance. There is a small, one sentence nod to the Dark Tower. I missed coping it down while I was listening, but to paraphrase, it goes something like this: "In some tower's keep, everything was right with the world." Close enough for government work, anyway. (hide spoiler)] In summation: Other than the final Dark Tower novels, Lisey's Story was the best thing to come out of post-accident King. There have been other terrific novels since this one, but for a while after that van creamed him, I was concerned. I think we all were. Lisey's Story renewed my faith in King. Final Judgment: Rehashed hash can still get you high.

  15. 5 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    I listened to the audio version of this book, and I got so tired of Mare Winningham reading all of the ridiculous nonsense words, that I couldn't even finish it. She was a great narrator, and I actually felt sorry for her. The story went nowhere, and it was hard to care about the characters. This is one of King's worst, IMO

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    “There was a lot they didn’t tell you about death, she had discovered, and one of the biggies was how long it took the ones you loved most to die in your heart.” Scott still speaks to Lisey, in her mind. He tells her to follow the clues, follow the bools. Her husband, a famous writer, died a few years ago. She spends nights remembering him, remembering his life, his near death, his other world. “I think most kids have a place they go to when they’re scared or lonely or just plain bored. They call “There was a lot they didn’t tell you about death, she had discovered, and one of the biggies was how long it took the ones you loved most to die in your heart.” Scott still speaks to Lisey, in her mind. He tells her to follow the clues, follow the bools. Her husband, a famous writer, died a few years ago. She spends nights remembering him, remembering his life, his near death, his other world. “I think most kids have a place they go to when they’re scared or lonely or just plain bored. They call it NeverLand or the Shire, Boo’ya Moon if they’ve got big imaginations and make it up for themselves. Most of them forget. The talented few – like Scott – harness their dreams and turn them into horses.” As Lisey struggles to cope with the loss of her husband, and the memories, and the constant drawing into something else, something more, something she will learn is her story, Lisey’s story, a maniac comes into her life and threatens her with a dead cat in the mailbox; he wants Scott’s stuff; he considers himself one of Scott’s biggest fans. Life never says “enough” it seems, one thing after another. Her sister has a nervous breakdown and cuts her body everywhere and ends up catatonic. Lisey has to help her. In King’s world, everything the characters go through connect; they all have a greater purpose. The poetic language pleases the heart. King mentions in the end he wrote this from the heart and not the head. The story has some serious autobiographical similarities, yet strong points of differentiation. One point being King never knew his dad, and Scott’s dad plays a major role. These may be symbolic representations. King has written and talked about his absent father, and how much that hurt him (cut him). The story is violent, shocking in violence (in honor of King I dropped “shockingly”), yet contrasts with the beauty of the language and the love story. This is love story, King-style. A major theme is cutting, mutilation of the body, by self and others. Insanity also weaves into fabric of the story – Scott’s dad, Scott, Scott’s brother, Lisey’s sister. Stephen King confronts the issues we don’t want to talk about. He confronts the darkness. He speaks out for those nobody wants to hear, those too ashamed to speak up, those with secrets too taboo for confession. Scott’s imaginary world, Boo’ya Moon reminded me of Fairy Land in George Macdonald’s Phantastes and, in fact, adapts that as a nickname. You will want to walk the tropical beauty by day, but don’t come around at night; all becomes poison and the Laughers come out, and other things of which death would be a better meeting. Scott went to Boo’ya moon for his ideas, a place he spent to break from reality and write his stories. Psychologists, I learned in a class once, might call this “psychological flow,” the state of mind people experience when they perform certain activities, such as singing, writing, playing an instrument, or sports (he’s on fire!). The first half or so of the book had low energy. I almost didn’t get through to the second half. About forty-seven percent or so, things peak. They don’t pick up, they peak. The first half seemed to me like placing the pieces in a chess game. The second half seemed like a completely different game altogether, like a Roman Gladiator fight or something. King has said the book claims his favorite spot for those he wrote. I believe the book claims the most important of all I’ve read of his works. I’ve never read Dolores Claiborne or Rose Madder (and other reviews mention these books). The book will continue to speak his life after he leaves the living world. Did he write this for his readers, or for his wife, who knows him the way Lisey knew Scott, and still loved him for him and not for his books? I warned my wife once. I said, “Babe, I’m going to cry the day Stephen King dies if I’m still here.” The world will cry.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Red Fields

    This is the first King I'm reading in about 25 years. ETA: I don't really like it much. I had it on my TBR list since it came out. I suppose I read a good review of it somewhere. I'm almost 100 pages in and feh. Not much has happened and while I don't dislike the protagonist I find her kind of vapid and not interesting. There is way too much made up language that is DUMB. So that doesn't leave much, IMO. I'm stopping at page 320. I am not wasting any more of my time on this. It's waaaay too long. This is the first King I'm reading in about 25 years. ETA: I don't really like it much. I had it on my TBR list since it came out. I suppose I read a good review of it somewhere. I'm almost 100 pages in and feh. Not much has happened and while I don't dislike the protagonist I find her kind of vapid and not interesting. There is way too much made up language that is DUMB. So that doesn't leave much, IMO. I'm stopping at page 320. I am not wasting any more of my time on this. It's waaaay too long. I no longer care what happens.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Harris

    I always reserve a palate-cleanser for myself every time I finish reading the longlist for a literary prize, and this time, Lisey's Story was it. Compelling in spite of its slowness, and coloured with nostalgia, tenderness and loss, this is primarily a love story, with some vintage King touches thrown in (to be honest, those touches were interesting, but far less so than the love story, which was genuinely moving and new). The journeys into other worlds, the madman on the rampage, the stories of I always reserve a palate-cleanser for myself every time I finish reading the longlist for a literary prize, and this time, Lisey's Story was it. Compelling in spite of its slowness, and coloured with nostalgia, tenderness and loss, this is primarily a love story, with some vintage King touches thrown in (to be honest, those touches were interesting, but far less so than the love story, which was genuinely moving and new). The journeys into other worlds, the madman on the rampage, the stories of unhappy, abused childhood, even the stuff about writers and their divided attitude towards inspiration, which I've always found compelling - we've all had those before. But here there's an added ingredient, which I enjoyed very much: and of course, Stephen King is one of the few men of his generation who manages to write convincing female characters whilst mostly avoiding the pitfalls to which so many more "literary" male writers succumb: read a page or two of Amis or Hemingway, and you'll see what I mean...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cody | codysbookshelf

    Stephen King has broken my heart. While he often writes of the nature of grief and loss, in no novel or short story does he do it more effectively than in Lisey’s Story: a mature and delightfully strange look into the mourning process. Lisey Landon, widow of two years, must begin finally moving out from under the memories of her husband, famous novelist Scott Landon. It begins in his study, when she is cleaning out his papers; it ends in an inverted and mysterious version of our world. This was m Stephen King has broken my heart. While he often writes of the nature of grief and loss, in no novel or short story does he do it more effectively than in Lisey’s Story: a mature and delightfully strange look into the mourning process. Lisey Landon, widow of two years, must begin finally moving out from under the memories of her husband, famous novelist Scott Landon. It begins in his study, when she is cleaning out his papers; it ends in an inverted and mysterious version of our world. This was my second read of this particular book. My first time was when I was a high school freshman, at age 14. I liked it then, but much of it went over my head. In the intervening years I’ve lived a little and grown up and experienced life’s little beauties and been dealt serious loss. Though I’ve never been married, I lost my best friend of seventeen years, last year. At one point in the narrative Lisey remarks on the telepathy that forms between two people after years of closeness. I feel that. I’ve been there. Perhaps my emotional connection to this story amped up my enjoyment of it, but I really don’t think so; this is simply damn fine writing. It is King at his most literary, his most generous, his most emotional. The scenes from Scott’s childhood are among the author’s most frightening, the quiet moments of Lisey’ contemplation in Scott’s study some of King’s most nuanced. Stephen King is a talented writer, that much is true, but I feel this novel is from another world. Booya Moon, perhaps, or something much like it. In fact, I loved it so much I am now declaring it my favorite King book, and I’ve revised my top ten list: 1. Lisey’s Story 2. Revival 3. The Dead Zone 4. Needful Things 5. 11/22/63 6. Pet Sematary 7. The Green Mile 8. The Shining 9. Duma Key 10. The Dark Half

  20. 5 out of 5

    Helen (Helena/Nell)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There's something special about Stephen King for me. I guess I'm a literary person at heart. Lots of Jane Austen and poetry, that's me. But I've always found King special. He recreates how I used to feel about Enid Blyton when I was a kid. Just a pleasure to read -- and once I pick up one of the books I can, if life permits, always finish it as a sitting. For me it's like eating a really delicious but slightly self-indulgent meal. Lemon mousse drizzled with good dark chocolate and whipped cream. L There's something special about Stephen King for me. I guess I'm a literary person at heart. Lots of Jane Austen and poetry, that's me. But I've always found King special. He recreates how I used to feel about Enid Blyton when I was a kid. Just a pleasure to read -- and once I pick up one of the books I can, if life permits, always finish it as a sitting. For me it's like eating a really delicious but slightly self-indulgent meal. Lemon mousse drizzled with good dark chocolate and whipped cream. Lisey's Story took two days, not one, but it was the same kind of intense experience for me as before. I had a lovely time reading it. There's another thing I should say about King novels. With my favourite ones, there is almost always a point where he disappoints me slightly (though I don't stop reading and I don't stop enjoying myself). In Dolores Claiborne it's the point where a character walks into a picture. Often, is the point where a psychological thriller turns into a fantasy romp. That was true in Insomnia. I like him best before he gets surreal - -often *just* before he does that thing. This novel is about a the wife of a dead novelist. Lots and lots of the detail is very close to King's own experience, so you do feel he's thinking right through that situation. It's dedicated to Tabitha, his wife, and if you buy into that scenario -- that she IS widowed and he (King himself) is gone -- loads of it seems intensely realistic. I think he does 'mine' his own life often, and quite a bit of it is in here, I think. I liked that about the book too. It makes me feel like King is a human being I know and like. It gets more complicated with a second plot element involving Lisey's sister who gets ill, mentally ill and goes blank, completely. Opts out. I believed that too. And I really liked the idea that one way of getting back to life, to mental health, was through creative imagination, but that if you stay out there in the dream-imagination space of our brains, you remain to all intents and purposes 'sick'. It starts to get surreal when we go back to the early relationship between Lisey and her dead husband -- and it appears there was a time -- in their early time together, when something peculiar happened -- he took her momentarily into another parallel world of some kind. It's very delicately handled. I believed it: I thought it was the kind of 'magic' that a novelist can do, that King is actually doing for me as I read the book. So mentally I hadn't got to the surreal stage then. And after that, there's loads about the novelist's early life, which was horrendous. But I still believed the idea that he could kind of vanish into another mental world, escape that way. Meanwhile, King's building the idea that this other world, this world of the imagination is realler than just symbolic. In this novel, people need to go there and when you get there not everything is roses. The 'other world' in it has a pool, what King calls 'the myth pool'. That was okay for me too. It reminded me very much of the wood between the worlds in C S Lewis's The Magician's Nephew. Back to my childhood again! And I really loved the nightmare creature who lives there - that image, the power of it, is as good as anything you can do in a poem. So of all the King novels, this one took me furthest into the 'magic' bit where he usually loses my allegiance slightly. It did it so successfully that I realise thinking back on it now, that I hadn't actually realised how far he'd gone surreal when the narrator's older brother becomes mentally ill in a way that is MORE than anything I think it really possible. And I found the attempted solution believable. In fact I believed this whole book -- I was right in there -- UNTIL just before the end. He lost me just before the end. It was this point where he called a tree in the other world 'the story tree'. It struck me as false. I'll go with the myth pool, and I don't mind the idea of someone reading a crucial story sitting under a tree. But please not The Story Tree. Having said that, I DID like this book. I liked loads about it. Most of it. The fact that it is really about writing appealed to me. And at the very end I really like the way Stephen King talks about his editor, Nan Graham, in his author's note at the end. He talks about the notes she sent back on his first stage ms: " I had first year French essays that came back cleaner". Really nice see someone do that -- acknowledge what difference a good editor can make -- even to the best-selling author in the world (I read that somewhere -- is he?). I guess he probably is. And that's my holiday reading over for the next three months....

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Go figure that Lisey's husband would be a writer - in a Stephen King book it's a rarity not to have a writer as a main male character, though it's nicer when he shakes things up a bit and features a doctor or a lawyer or a businessman or a psychotic old lady or something else. But maybe I'm being too picky. Anyway, Lisey's Story is an okay horror novel, but not one of my favourite King works. In fact it ranks down there in my view with the not-so-great of his works alongside The Tommyknockers (b Go figure that Lisey's husband would be a writer - in a Stephen King book it's a rarity not to have a writer as a main male character, though it's nicer when he shakes things up a bit and features a doctor or a lawyer or a businessman or a psychotic old lady or something else. But maybe I'm being too picky. Anyway, Lisey's Story is an okay horror novel, but not one of my favourite King works. In fact it ranks down there in my view with the not-so-great of his works alongside The Tommyknockers (but not nearly as bad as the crass and absurdly pointless Dreamcatcher). Don't get me wrong, King has written some genuinely unforgettable stuff like Pet Sematary, The Things They Left Behind and The Shining, but what set those books apart is that King isn't afraid to dive deep into the stories and really create something special, whereas in Lisey's Story it's more of an almost plot-lacking character study with more rambling observation than anything else. Lisey's Story also seems to be some sort of bizarre and not-so-subtle homage to Stephen King himself. I don't have anything against authors who write about characters a lot like themselves in terms of profession, physical appearance, personality, etc. etc., but when it's done in such a gushing, romantic sort of way it comes across as some sort of bizarre vanity project or something. I found the parts featuring Lisey on her own were more interesting, but still she just kept revolving around the topic of Scott and his brilliant writer's imagination. With a rather forced ending that feels like it was just tacked on later to wrap things up for the sake of getting the novel published, this is a book that fans of King's familiar writing style will no doubt enjoy more or less, but one that newcomers to the horror genre or more seasoned horror readers with a wider variety beyond Stephen King might quickly get bored of. It's a bit self-indulgent at times, there are many points at which the story just seems to wander off and go nowhere, and while Lisey's journey through time is engaging and there are many deep statements throughout to ponder over, it's a slow-burning book that some readers will love and others will hate.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mina Villalobos

    As King grows older, his books seem to turn ever more emotionally overwhelming and wistful -and this one, particularly, very sweet. Lisey's Story has a thread of fundamental wrongness going through it that keeps the suspense going -the horror side of King's narrative is strong as ever, the descriptions of the physical hardships are engrossing and captivating in a level that makes you feel terribly uncomfortable, but there's another thread of horror, a very human, everyday thread, about love and As King grows older, his books seem to turn ever more emotionally overwhelming and wistful -and this one, particularly, very sweet. Lisey's Story has a thread of fundamental wrongness going through it that keeps the suspense going -the horror side of King's narrative is strong as ever, the descriptions of the physical hardships are engrossing and captivating in a level that makes you feel terribly uncomfortable, but there's another thread of horror, a very human, everyday thread, about love and loss, and how no matter how special we might be or feel we are, we all have to reach the end of the road, and there's no coming back home after that. The characters are all fantastic. Lisey and Scott are the romance story I always want to read, the one with hardships but that conquers everything -almost everything- with their love and respect for each other. The sisters are all... very sisterlike. It's funny and annoying and infuriating, but under all of that there's definitely love. I think this is the most tender book I've read from King, you can feel the way he craddles the story and the characters with infinite gentleness even as he breaks them and makes them go through hell. The narrative breaking into past, memories and present is a real page turner. I like to put down books on clean chapter breaks, so I had a hard time putting this one down. And when I finally finished it, it was with a deep sense of wistfulness. The dead ones still love. And we will always love them back. And that's the beautiful pain of this story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    Not too many years ago, I embarked on a Stephen King marathon (that lasted me a good two years in itself). I did re-read quite a lot of the great man’s books (quite a few of them for first time in original language) along with completing with the ones I missed/avoided. My only other ‘rule’ though, was to not re-read the ones I had read in recent times and therefore this one was skipped then and read now for first time in English. I’ve always been fond of this, ever since reading the Swedish tran Not too many years ago, I embarked on a Stephen King marathon (that lasted me a good two years in itself). I did re-read quite a lot of the great man’s books (quite a few of them for first time in original language) along with completing with the ones I missed/avoided. My only other ‘rule’ though, was to not re-read the ones I had read in recent times and therefore this one was skipped then and read now for first time in English. I’ve always been fond of this, ever since reading the Swedish translation, but obviously I didn’t get it all the way then, because this is a wonderful book! Not a horror story, not a fantasy story, but a story with a brilliant protagonist that has horror and fantasy parts to it. Writing is brilliant, pace is quite slow (if you know that you’re in for this, it’s never a problem) and the rewards is plentiful. Loads of references and easter eggs (but it never feels forced) and good set of characters. Yes the cute baby-like expressions and the many internal jokes and references between Scott Landon and his widowed wife Lisey are a bit annoying, but don’t we all have them? They really bring a feeling of reality to the story, more than anything I think. Other than that, the book’s fantastic. I have no idea what I was on reading my review from last time, but a four-star read this is not. The hard back is gorgeous also.

  24. 5 out of 5

    The Face of Your Father

    I've heard the critiques of this novel, them being that the novel is "too slow". Perhaps I can see where people would feel that way, but for me personally; I just couldn't turn the pages quick enough. This is definitely a novel that "takes its time", let us say. But with that time, King does some vital aspects to good storytelling; he devotes all the time to characters as they build with every page. He lets readers begin to become accustomed to the Landon's special language. By part two; the lan I've heard the critiques of this novel, them being that the novel is "too slow". Perhaps I can see where people would feel that way, but for me personally; I just couldn't turn the pages quick enough. This is definitely a novel that "takes its time", let us say. But with that time, King does some vital aspects to good storytelling; he devotes all the time to characters as they build with every page. He lets readers begin to become accustomed to the Landon's special language. By part two; the language is no longer personal or jarring to read; it's familiar. Also, the mystery of the novel is some of the best that I've seen King do. It is a novel that refuses to be categorized into a genre. It is a romance, a tragedy, a thriller, a crime novel, a mystery, a possible coming of age tale when Scott Landon begins to mention his childhood (Paul, Daddy, Bool, Blood Bool, The Bad Gunky etc etc..) and, of course, a touch of the possible supernatural to tape it all together. It is impossible for me to not enjoy a novel that takes such risks as these. This is a novel that would fit in perfectly within King's 1990s era. Now, King in the 90's is my all-time favorite King, the span of novels during that time is at the apex of his career. 2007's 'Lisey's Story' share many of the same qualities of those 1990's novels. It has the strong female protagonist that was so prominent for King in the 90's, there is graphic scenes of abuse which is a topic King covered heavily during the 90's, there is magical realism which also played a large part for King in the 90's, there are the other worlds than ours which was also featured in such 90's works like 'Rose Madder' and 'Insomnia', there is the vivid imagery that rivals both 'Insomnia' and 'Wizard & Glass', and finally, 'Lisey's Story' has the same wonderful imaginative storytelling of 'The Regulators'. When you read works from the 90's like 'Insomnia', 'Rose Madder', 'The Regulators', 'Desperation', 'The Wastelands', 'Wizard & Glass', 'The Langoliers' etc.. You bask in King's imagination that has gone wild and 'Lisey's Story' fits right in there with the very best. ‘Lisey’s Story’ is ‘The Talisman’ crossed with ‘Bag of Bones’ and it ultimately could be the most touching and thought provoking novel of King’s entire career.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Olivier Delaye

    Lisey’s Story is a bit of an oddball in Stephen King’s body of work (along with Gerald’s Game from what I’ve heard, although I haven’t read it myself) because of its near absence of plot and snail-like pace. However, what it lacks in plot, it makes up in characterization and introspection. So if you don’t like being inside characters’ heads for hundreds and hundreds of pages without much action going on, then this book is not for you. As for me, I find sharing Lisey’s thoughts and discovering wi Lisey’s Story is a bit of an oddball in Stephen King’s body of work (along with Gerald’s Game from what I’ve heard, although I haven’t read it myself) because of its near absence of plot and snail-like pace. However, what it lacks in plot, it makes up in characterization and introspection. So if you don’t like being inside characters’ heads for hundreds and hundreds of pages without much action going on, then this book is not for you. As for me, I find sharing Lisey’s thoughts and discovering with her bits and pieces of her late husband’s past a most fascinating and rewarding experience. I even like the made-up language they use together, and unlike some I do not think it makes the book hard to read. If anything, it creates a greater sense of intimacy between us readers and Lisey, and of course between Lisey and her husband Scott. Definitely one of my favorite Stephen King novels, and in my humble opinion one of his strongest.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marnie Krüger

    O, WOW! This is why I idolise King. He can take any topic throw in a crazy stalker and a celebrity author with a vivid imagination and bring to us a story that will live in us for ever. Not many male or female authors can write from the viewpoint of the opiste sex, but King is so good, you'll believe you are reading a female author's work. This is a must read for ever married couple out there. It truly teaches about love so strong and during that not even worlds apart can the lovers be separated, O, WOW! This is why I idolise King. He can take any topic throw in a crazy stalker and a celebrity author with a vivid imagination and bring to us a story that will live in us for ever. Not many male or female authors can write from the viewpoint of the opiste sex, but King is so good, you'll believe you are reading a female author's work. This is a must read for ever married couple out there. It truly teaches about love so strong and during that not even worlds apart can the lovers be separated, not even death in all its finality can end such love. Me, I envy Scott and Lisey. But no worries King fans, there is still all of the "Kingly" scary, gruesome factors in this book as well. He combines this epic love story with tragedy, monsters, and past doings to write in my opinion one of his best books. This one will definitely be going on my read again pile.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nick Iuppa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. LISEY’S STORY FIVE STARS An incredible tale of love and madness told, very much of the time, as an interior monologue in the mind of a grieving widow, and in the ramblings of a ten-year-old boy who lived through an unimaginable hell. That boy, Scott Landon (Scooter, ya Old Scoot – as his insane daddy called him) went on to become a best selling author, National Book Award winner, and discoverer (creator?) of Boo’ya Moon – a secret, magical place that both nourishes and kills. He’s a father murdere LISEY’S STORY FIVE STARS An incredible tale of love and madness told, very much of the time, as an interior monologue in the mind of a grieving widow, and in the ramblings of a ten-year-old boy who lived through an unimaginable hell. That boy, Scott Landon (Scooter, ya Old Scoot – as his insane daddy called him) went on to become a best selling author, National Book Award winner, and discoverer (creator?) of Boo’ya Moon – a secret, magical place that both nourishes and kills. He’s a father murderer too because he’s also a survivor. In Scott’s mind and the minds of so many readers, certainly, one of the very best things he ever did, maybe the key to his survival for so many years, was to marry little Lisey Debusher... youngest, littlest, and strongest of the Debusher sisters. She saved him. Lisa Landon is one strong woman let me tell you, and the fact may escape you if you just listen to her interior monologues. Oh yes, she’s in awe of Scott. Yes, she admires his work and his genius. She’s content to stand in the background, hold the ceremonial shovel that they gave her husband after he used it to dig the first spade of earth at the dedication of a new university library. But she’s just as quick to whack an intended murderer with it, just in time to save her Scott’s life. And the fact that they give credit for the heroic act to an uninvolved bystander is something that she just finds... funny. She’s with Scott, after all, she’s on the inside. Though no one knows the pain she has to share because of it. Lisey is so strong she can go to Boo’ya moon on her own. She can bring Scott back when he goes there to hide. Lisey finds her sister there and saves her too. After Scott dies and some madman decides he wants to kill Lisey to get Scott’s old papers (or more realistically, just for the thrill of it), Lisey sends the cops away. She doesn’t want or need their protection; she’s not even sure what she’s doing consciously. But inside she knows exactly what’s happening and how to get rid of the guy. And she does it. Then she confronts the same monster that stalked Scott all of his life and faces up to it. That’s how strong little Lisey is. Playing against the narrative of Lisey’s Story is the story of little Scottie Landon. Telling his girl/his wife about the horrific series of experiences is one of the challenges Scott faces, and he takes the whole book to reveal all the details. These details (let me tell you) allow Mr. King to display all his powers to shock and horrify. But that’s not the genius of this book. It’s the love story, and the love between Scott and Lisey (and maybe Steve and Tabatha King) glows on almost every page... never maudlin, never overstated; it’s just simply, beautifully there. I listened to the audiobook read by Mare Winningham, this time around. And it was impeccable, powerful, amazing. Slow and intimate it’s one of the best audiobook readings I’ve ever heard. She has to move back and forth between the voice of Lisey, and little Scott and Scott’s insane father... sometimes in the space of a single sentence. The performance is simply masterful. (Yikes! Six adjectives in one paragraph - five in a row... not good Nick.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    *****UPDATE: 8-25-2016....I am going to try this one again, since I've read more of King's books now, and after reading some of the Dark Tower books. I am sure I will have a better appreciation of this great book....I also should say: I think this was my first King read. I had not been acquainted well with his "universe". Yet, what I said about the "scare" I had was true--I watch horror movies all the time. NOTHING scares me, but there was a point in this book where I got so freaked out I couldn *****UPDATE: 8-25-2016....I am going to try this one again, since I've read more of King's books now, and after reading some of the Dark Tower books. I am sure I will have a better appreciation of this great book....I also should say: I think this was my first King read. I had not been acquainted well with his "universe". Yet, what I said about the "scare" I had was true--I watch horror movies all the time. NOTHING scares me, but there was a point in this book where I got so freaked out I couldn't pick it up again for another month or so....it was the middle of the night and I actually called the person who loaned this to me and yelled at them something like, "Thanks a lot!!! I can't sleep now...can't even turn off my light...why did you do this to me???" Yep--very rude of me. I just was not used to feeling fear....I can't remember what it was, but I had to pick up something mind-numbingly cheerful to get me through the night. ****First review: I liked MOST of this book. Especially the first two-thirds or so. I am a very hard person to scare, but there was at least one section that made me shiver and not want to turn the lights out, which says a lot for me. Unfortunately, I was not crazy about all the time spent in the "other world", for lack of a better phrase-a lot of time was spent in this supernatural world, which I wish had been a bit less, the real world scares were good enough for me. Similar to how I felt about Rose Madder a bit later. Over all, a very entertaining read, though, and I know many people who thought the supernatural world was the best part. Worth noting: This was King's personal favorite, wrote with Tabitha in his heart and mind...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    4.5 stars *NO SPOILERS HERE* Oh, as usual, I assume that you have already read the synopsis. Firstly, smucked, smucking, smuck... If you're about to read this book, these are terms you'll come to know very well. I should have counted the times and started a sort of "jelly baby count" competition. Now that it's said... I loved this book BUT, it was all a little bit too "smucking" lyrical at times and although this is usually one of Kings draw cards, when Lisey thinks, sometimes that rhythm becomes a 4.5 stars *NO SPOILERS HERE* Oh, as usual, I assume that you have already read the synopsis. Firstly, smucked, smucking, smuck... If you're about to read this book, these are terms you'll come to know very well. I should have counted the times and started a sort of "jelly baby count" competition. Now that it's said... I loved this book BUT, it was all a little bit too "smucking" lyrical at times and although this is usually one of Kings draw cards, when Lisey thinks, sometimes that rhythm becomes all too convoluted, if not, bordering on nonsense. That is to say, that being in Liseys head sometimes gets really smucking annoying. As usual, Im always too quick to lay out what annoyed me. Sorry. This really is a smucking brilliant story! Even though reading it from Liseys inner thoughts, was like trying to untangle a senseless and distracting riddle at times. Hmmm, I'm not quite sure if that was intended because the character is neurotic (with grief?), or if the author thinks that this is how a woman's mind works? No doubt a question for another day. If you've read this, I'm sure you'd also agree that the word "smucking" ain't going to stick ;) Liked: The word pool. Boo-ya moon. Bools. The Long Boy. So imaginative. Loved: The layers! So much going on and so beautifully interlaced. Also, the nostalgia he awakens. Disliked: The word "smucking" (It halted my flow every single time) and the jagged (at times confusing) narration. The Verdict: This book is as much about suspense and the unknown as it is about grief and family. It hits all the happy heart buttons whilst simultaneously ripping it out. True to King style, the drama appears slowly amidst a rolling sea of memories, imagery, thoughts and feelings. I've nursed this book for a while now, it's made me cry and laugh and get angry, but I think these emotions won't be drawn out in every reader, these moments were pulled from my own experience with loss. On the other hand, haven't we all dealt with that? Yet again, when it comes to tugging on the human condition, The King reigns supreme! I loved it. It's not his best, but it was only a small spill of annoyances that stole this half a star. Well worth your time and patience, and afterwards, Lisey's Story will stick to you like crazy-glue whether you like it or not.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dean liapis

    SOME SPOLIERS, NOTHING TOO SERIOUS Garbage. Stephen King has apparently lost all of his previously considerable talent. This book reads like a mismash of about 4 of his other books (most notably coming to mind, the Stand, Rose Madder and the Dark Half), and comes together like absolute crap. Booya moon is boring and uninteresting (the place is pretty much a sissyfied version of the territories from the tailsman with a character actually mentioning the territories at one point), and contains an "e SOME SPOLIERS, NOTHING TOO SERIOUS Garbage. Stephen King has apparently lost all of his previously considerable talent. This book reads like a mismash of about 4 of his other books (most notably coming to mind, the Stand, Rose Madder and the Dark Half), and comes together like absolute crap. Booya moon is boring and uninteresting (the place is pretty much a sissyfied version of the territories from the tailsman with a character actually mentioning the territories at one point), and contains an "evil monster" who is a big worm that isn't scary in the slightest. But it only comes out at night! OOOHHHHHH! The other bad guy (some idiot who cuts off chick's nipples with a can opener, and is basically the prototype for shooter in the dark half; his last name is even "Shooter") is some bumpkin that is really menacing as he threatens Lisey, a middle aged woman. Speaking of, the lead character, Lisey, is annoying and rather flat; you really don't care about her at all, or her immediate family. There is only one section that shows a glimmer of SK's old talent, a part about Lisey's husband's crazy ass family history, but it only lasts for about 25 pages. The ending attempts to redeem some semblance of quality, but falls flat. Skip this waste of time, and re-read IT or Christine

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