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Seas of Blood

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The city of Tak is the greatest den of thieves, pirates and cut-throats that the civilized world has ever seen! In this city of scum, there are two pirates infamous for their ruthless greed, their daring raids and their countless skirmishes with death. One of these villains is Abdul the Butcher. The other is YOU. Only one of you can be King of the Pirates. A wag The city of Tak is the greatest den of thieves, pirates and cut-throats that the civilized world has ever seen! In this city of scum, there are two pirates infamous for their ruthless greed, their daring raids and their countless skirmishes with death. One of these villains is Abdul the Butcher. The other is YOU. Only one of you can be King of the Pirates. A wager is laid, a race is on. But which of you will win? Two dice, a pencil and an eraser are all you need for this rip-roaring adventure. YOU decide which course to sail, which dangers to risk and which monsters to fight.


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The city of Tak is the greatest den of thieves, pirates and cut-throats that the civilized world has ever seen! In this city of scum, there are two pirates infamous for their ruthless greed, their daring raids and their countless skirmishes with death. One of these villains is Abdul the Butcher. The other is YOU. Only one of you can be King of the Pirates. A wag The city of Tak is the greatest den of thieves, pirates and cut-throats that the civilized world has ever seen! In this city of scum, there are two pirates infamous for their ruthless greed, their daring raids and their countless skirmishes with death. One of these villains is Abdul the Butcher. The other is YOU. Only one of you can be King of the Pirates. A wager is laid, a race is on. But which of you will win? Two dice, a pencil and an eraser are all you need for this rip-roaring adventure. YOU decide which course to sail, which dangers to risk and which monsters to fight.

30 review for Seas of Blood

  1. 5 out of 5

    David

    Unlike most gamebook stories that has you playing a hero (reluctant or otherwise) going after a villain, injustice, destiny, etc., this one casts you as a pirate and in a race to see who can plunder and pillage the most and fastest. I like the uniqueness of it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    A Competition Between Pirates 9 July 2012 This gamebook was actually very surprising, and also very ambitious. What surprised me even more is that the author this particular book was also the author of what I considered to be pretty much the worst of the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks that I had read to date. I would not necessarily call this one the best though since many of the earlier ones, while basic in many ways, bring back a lot of childhood memories. However Seas of Blood seems to tak A Competition Between Pirates 9 July 2012 This gamebook was actually very surprising, and also very ambitious. What surprised me even more is that the author this particular book was also the author of what I considered to be pretty much the worst of the Fighting Fantasy gamebooks that I had read to date. I would not necessarily call this one the best though since many of the earlier ones, while basic in many ways, bring back a lot of childhood memories. However Seas of Blood seems to take the gamebooks in a new direction, being more than simply making choices and fighting enemies. Seas of Blood brings in a new concept that, if played properly, makes the book much more difficult. There is still one direct route, and you need to find this route to be able to complete the book, but the way to successfully complete the book is quite different. The two new elements added is a scoring system (namely booty) and a timing system (namely the log). The whole idea is to complete the book within the time limit of 50 days and have a wealth in excess of 800 gold. If that sounds difficult that is because it is, and there are a number of entries in which you have to add days to your log book. However, it is not necessarily a book where you need to collect specific items. The further difference is that you are the captain of a pirate ship who has entered a competition with another pirate to see who is the best on the seas of blood. You have fifty days to get from your starting point to the end point with as much gold as possible, and in many cases your nemesis always seems to be one step ahead of you (he always arrives at the island before you). Also, the book has created a means of mass combat in that you have a crew who will fight on your behalf. However, unlike stamina, restoring your crew is a lot more difficult (and a lot more expensive). Also, part of the booty you collect are slaves, but at the end of the adventure the slaves are pretty much worthless: you need to sell them somewhere before you reach your final destination. Oh, and there is a map at the beginning of the story which gives you an idea of the routes that you can take to reach your goal, so you can pretty much pre-plan your route (especially if you are familiar with the story). In fact I am tempted to actually re-read this book using the appropriate dice system (as I am also tempted to do with Appointment with F.E.A.R.). I will finish off with something about this book that suddenly struck me as I was reading it: Champman borrowed a lot from the Odyssey. Simply by doing that increased my appreciation of the book to no end. When I originally read it I didn't pick up the references up (probably because I had never read the Odyssey at the time) but now, being as familiar with the story that I am, it is very clear. In a way I am not surprised that he borrowed from the Odyssey because, come on, Odysseus pretty much behaved like a pirate, at least in the first part of his journey before his crew were all killed off with the encounter with Scylla and Charybdis (and you can see the reference to Scylla, as well as a very Greek looking Trireme, on the cover). I first picked up the references when we arrived at an island inhabited by a young lady and she offered me some soup. I was a bit suspicious, so I turned it down, and sure enough my entire crew turned into animals. CIRCE! I screamed, and while you do fight her, fortunately (particularly since this is a book aimed at teenagers) you do not rape her as Odysseus did. You also encounter an island in which there is unattended cattle, and people familiar with the Odyssey will know to leave the cattle alone. Oh, and on this same island you meet up with some soldiers who, if you tell them of your story, give you a bag containing wind, and sure enough the crew become jealous and want to look inside (maybe that I why that scene in the Odyssey was so familiar, Homer stole it off of Seas of Blood). Finally, I should also mention that you fight a cyclops at the end.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Edwin McRae

    I really got broadsided by nostalgia with this one. As a kid Seas of Blood was one of my favourites. As an adult, I can now see the frustratingly ad hoc design. Nothing quite makes sense. A shame, because the concept is still sound. Could be a good case for upcycling.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam Cleaver

    I loved these books as a kid. Must go back and re-read them to make a proper review. But just look at that art work too... amazing!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael Kelly

    Much better than Andrew Chapman's previous two contributions to the Fighting Fantasy. This piratical adventure, a contest between two pirates, is an interesting and unique premise. The ship's log system provides a deadline by which the finishing point in the race must be reached and a certain amount of treasure must be gathered in order to beat your rival (I confess that by the end I had only gathered half of what was needed). Most of the encounters are interesting, some are very chal Much better than Andrew Chapman's previous two contributions to the Fighting Fantasy. This piratical adventure, a contest between two pirates, is an interesting and unique premise. The ship's log system provides a deadline by which the finishing point in the race must be reached and a certain amount of treasure must be gathered in order to beat your rival (I confess that by the end I had only gathered half of what was needed). Most of the encounters are interesting, some are very challenging. There are some very arbitrary events, however, which grate a bit. Overall, the book was a fun diversion and not to be sniffed at. However, it is telling that having reached the end, I simply can't be arsed to play through it again to try to find enough treasure to win the contest. Having been through it once, a revisit simply doesn't appeal, not for quite some time at least.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael Reilly

    Sail the Inland Sea, plundering as only YOU can to win a wager with your greatest rival. This is far from a hero’s quest, instead offering the opportunity to play as a criminal, plundering loot from any source likely to fill your coffer with gold. You’ll travel from point-to-point, eagerly exploring the lands surrounding the sea and facing many troublesome developments on and under the water. It’s a challenge, a race, and a test of fortune – a swashbuckling adventure where only one man can claim Sail the Inland Sea, plundering as only YOU can to win a wager with your greatest rival. This is far from a hero’s quest, instead offering the opportunity to play as a criminal, plundering loot from any source likely to fill your coffer with gold. You’ll travel from point-to-point, eagerly exploring the lands surrounding the sea and facing many troublesome developments on and under the water. It’s a challenge, a race, and a test of fortune – a swashbuckling adventure where only one man can claim the ultimate prize! Seas of Blood includes all the hallmarks – both good and bad – of the Fighting Fantasy series. Risk and reward can feel somewhat imbalanced, resulting in lost opportunities that consume valuable time with little return. A few too many choices offer no obvious logic, nor allow opportunities for assistance from knowledge gained previously – add these occasional issues to the regularly occurring instances of failure due to unfortunate dice rolls and the growing frustration can be profoundly irritating. There are multiple routes to take, and various ways to approach many of the encounters, so you’ll uncover alternative strategies and outcomes on every playthrough, however, the adventure is only of modest length. Entertaining yet lacking any great depth.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Really enjoyed this one as for once you are the VILLIAN of the piece,but the way the days of your log was decided was pointless!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trisha Kirkendoll

  9. 5 out of 5

    Martin Jenkins

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  11. 5 out of 5

    SewIRead

  12. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Moon

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joel Jerónimo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Andren

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Machado

  17. 5 out of 5

    Duncan Horastead

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ruaidhri

  19. 4 out of 5

    John

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andy Ralls

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tiago Cardoso

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jorge

  23. 4 out of 5

    Halo Grottesco

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul Negus

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leo .

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dominic Creech

  27. 4 out of 5

    Linda Clark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karel Musil

  29. 5 out of 5

    Wolfgang Thorn

  30. 4 out of 5

    Speed

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