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The Huntress

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From the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling novel, The Alice Network, comes another fascinating historical novel about a battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot who join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America. In the aftermath of war, the hunter becomes the hunted… Bold, reckless Nina Markov From the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling novel, The Alice Network, comes another fascinating historical novel about a battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot who join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America. In the aftermath of war, the hunter becomes the hunted… Bold, reckless Nina Markova grows up on the icy edge of Soviet Russia, dreaming of flight and fearing nothing. When the tide of war sweeps over her homeland, she gambles everything to join the infamous Night Witches, an all-female night bomber regiment wreaking havoc on Hitler’s eastern front. But when she is downed behind enemy lines and thrown across the path of a lethal Nazi murderess known as the Huntress, Nina must use all her wits to survive. British war correspondent Ian Graham has witnessed the horrors of war from Omaha Beach to the Nuremberg Trials. He abandons journalism after the war to become a Nazi hunter, yet one target eludes him: the Huntress. Fierce, disciplined Ian must join forces with brazen, cocksure Nina, the only witness to escape the Huntress alive. But a shared secret could derail their mission, unless Ian and Nina force themselves to confront it. Seventeen-year-old Jordan McBride grows up in post WWII Boston, determined despite family opposition to become a photographer. At first delighted when her long-widowed father brings home a fiancée, Jordan grows increasingly disquieted by the soft-spoken German widow who seems to be hiding something. Armed only with her camera and her wits, Jordan delves into her new stepmother’s past and slowly realizes there are mysteries buried deep in her family. But Jordan’s search for the truth may threaten all she holds dear.


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From the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling novel, The Alice Network, comes another fascinating historical novel about a battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot who join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America. In the aftermath of war, the hunter becomes the hunted… Bold, reckless Nina Markov From the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling novel, The Alice Network, comes another fascinating historical novel about a battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot who join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America. In the aftermath of war, the hunter becomes the hunted… Bold, reckless Nina Markova grows up on the icy edge of Soviet Russia, dreaming of flight and fearing nothing. When the tide of war sweeps over her homeland, she gambles everything to join the infamous Night Witches, an all-female night bomber regiment wreaking havoc on Hitler’s eastern front. But when she is downed behind enemy lines and thrown across the path of a lethal Nazi murderess known as the Huntress, Nina must use all her wits to survive. British war correspondent Ian Graham has witnessed the horrors of war from Omaha Beach to the Nuremberg Trials. He abandons journalism after the war to become a Nazi hunter, yet one target eludes him: the Huntress. Fierce, disciplined Ian must join forces with brazen, cocksure Nina, the only witness to escape the Huntress alive. But a shared secret could derail their mission, unless Ian and Nina force themselves to confront it. Seventeen-year-old Jordan McBride grows up in post WWII Boston, determined despite family opposition to become a photographer. At first delighted when her long-widowed father brings home a fiancée, Jordan grows increasingly disquieted by the soft-spoken German widow who seems to be hiding something. Armed only with her camera and her wits, Jordan delves into her new stepmother’s past and slowly realizes there are mysteries buried deep in her family. But Jordan’s search for the truth may threaten all she holds dear.

30 review for The Huntress

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    There’ll be a chance, Nina Borisovna, her father had said. Don’t ask, when you see it. Just fucking take it. 4 1/2 stars. I love historical fiction that introduces me to little areas of history that school lessons and history books never taught me about. Fiction is my passion, but I love it even more when it uncovers oft-buried truths. Here, Quinn blends fact and fiction to tell a story about three women: a murderess on the run, an aspiring photographer who may be in danger in her own home, and There’ll be a chance, Nina Borisovna, her father had said. Don’t ask, when you see it. Just fucking take it. 4 1/2 stars. I love historical fiction that introduces me to little areas of history that school lessons and history books never taught me about. Fiction is my passion, but I love it even more when it uncovers oft-buried truths. Here, Quinn blends fact and fiction to tell a story about three women: a murderess on the run, an aspiring photographer who may be in danger in her own home, and one of the Nachthexen. The Night Witches. These Night Witches were very real. I've heard the term before, but knew very little about this all-female Soviet bomber regiment. In this book, Nina fights her way out of the coldness and poverty of Siberia, away from her abusive father and towards her dreams of flight. As a Soviet pilot, she finds her true place and family. But, as the book is split between several different years - and we know where Nina ends up - there is an air of sadness about these chapters too-- a looming sense that something is going to go horribly wrong. Some years later, in a completely different time and place, a young Bostonian named Jordan longs to be a photographer but is held back because she is a girl. Fortunately, it looks like her new stepmother could offer a solution. But Jordan is constantly haunted by a picture she took back when her father first introduced Annaliese. Just one picture that seemed, for a brief moment, to show another side to the woman. In yet another time - and note that there are roughly five years between each of the time periods - journalist Ian Graham tracks down monsters. And no monster plays on his mind more than die Jagerin. The Huntress. A Nazi. A cold-blooded killer. He pursues her, accompanied by the same Nina we've met before, and finds himself trekking across the ocean in his chase. It's a very rich character-driven story, with many layers and secrets. Each of the characters is so well-drawn and complex, with Nina being especially fabulous. It is in turn a portrait of women fighting the constraints placed upon them by the societies in which they live, and a thrilling pursuit of a terrifying female villain. I feel I should say it is not much of a mystery, if that is something you're expecting. Uncovering the Huntress's identity is not the main focus; exploring the lives and aspirations of Nina and Jordan is. The only thing I didn't like so much was the romance. It wasn't that I minded them being together, but I found it an unnecessary development that added nothing to the story. There was already so much going on. Still, it's a small complaint really. Quinn reintroduces the same split time/perspective technique she used in The Alice Network, but I think it worked much better here. All of the perspectives were interesting and exciting to me. What I love most about both of the Quinn books I've read is how she puts women back into the history they have long been written out of. She reminds us that women were pilots and spies and fighters and... yes, even murderers. I liked it a lot. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chaima ✨ شيماء

    “Building a generation is like building a wall—one good well-made brick at a time, one good well-made child at a time. Enough good bricks, you have a good wall. Enough good children, you have a generation that won’t start a world-enveloping war.” If ever a standalone novel cried out to become a full-fledged series, The Huntress is it. Quinn’s storytelling is suffused with grace, dazzle and heart—not to mention a sharp, saw-toothed edge of darkness. Telegraphed in clipped prose and dialogue that “Building a generation is like building a wall—one good well-made brick at a time, one good well-made child at a time. Enough good bricks, you have a good wall. Enough good children, you have a generation that won’t start a world-enveloping war.” If ever a standalone novel cried out to become a full-fledged series, The Huntress is it. Quinn’s storytelling is suffused with grace, dazzle and heart—not to mention a sharp, saw-toothed edge of darkness. Telegraphed in clipped prose and dialogue that's as taut as ship ropes and anchored in an ever-present undercurrent of tension that occasionally bursts into tiffs, The Huntress (mostly) maintains an impeccable pace, even as the novel veers from character to character, from past to present and back again. World War II is over, and former war correspondent Ian Graham is standing in its ashes. It might have been enough to say that they have all passed through a long, dark time and come out of it alive and strong. Ian might have turned aside and gone about his life, giddy with relief that such burdens weren’t his to shoulder anymore. Most would have. Ian Graham didn’t. Not when the Huntress is still hanging over his head like an axe. “ I’m done writing instead of doing ,” says Ian who, alongside his partner and Jewish polyglot Tony Rodomovsky, has made the road his home when he’d embarked on the shabby affair of hunting war criminals. One name gleams brighter than the others: Lorelei Vogt, also known as the Huntress—a Nazi who was responsible for the killing of several Polish refugees, many of whom were children. Ian’s desire for the Huntress to face justice has never been so piercing, the chasm of his hatred for her opening even deeper when Ian learns that his brother also died at her pitiless hands. And he's not the only one. In the darkness behind her shut lids, Nina Markova sees the same thing as Ian: the Huntress. Nina is one of the famed Russian bomber pilots known as the Night Witches. She is also the only person who faced the Huntress and lived to recount the tale. Together with Ian and Tony, Nina weights the fact, examines the strains and weaknesses of every claim and claimant, turning the scattered clues this way and that, upside down, then righting them again, but, often, there came the sense that they were all running full speed into a brick wall. Meanwhile, in Boston lives Jordan McBride, a budding photographer who welcomed into her family an Austrian refugee named Annaliese as her new step-mother. Annaliese’s laconism and secrecy did little to dispel Jordan’s feeling that there was more to her father’s new bride than met the eye. A dozen times suspicion and doubt scorch Jordan—the discovery of a swastika charm concealed in Anna’s bridal bouquet and a candid shot of Anna that lent a chilling cruelty to her face—but its fire never burn through her skin. Her step-mother’s explanations are incontestable, and Jordan’s conviction, once absolute, wavers. Annaliese  has only ever shown Jordan kindness, and was the only person who encouraged her to nudge at the tantalizing door of her dreams with all its luminous secrets, even when her own father treated her ambitions as the trappings of a child, to be doffed as a grown woman. Though the novel sags slightly in the middle, it's when the characters' separate journeys begin to entwine with one another, their struggles inexorably congealing into an overwhelming whole, and we come to the meetings of the waterways, that Quinn proves herself up to the task. She soon ratchets up the stakes to another level entirely, her writing and storytelling firing on all cylinders, and I felt as if there were a rope attached to my middle, towing me forward into the denouement. Quinn also uses her setting to great effect and allows bursts of humor and camaraderie to shoot through the moral murk of the story, but it is the way she channels, with vivacious flourish, the triumphs and tribulations of real historical figures into a unique, engrossing and thought-provoking work of fiction that will last long after her conclusion is reached. Nina’s and Jordan’s narratives, especially, sing to the extraordinary women in history who worked tirelessly around, under or through the patriarchy that shaped their reality and went on to accomplish extraordinary feats. It's what makes the Huntress a bold and innovative twist on the genre that proves that historical fiction does not have to confine itself to its more durable tropes and settings. The dead lie beyond any struggle, so we living must struggle for them. We must remember, because there are other wheels that turn besides the wheel of justice. Time is a wheel, vast and indifferent, and when time rolls on and men forget, we face the risk of circling back. We slouch yawning to a new horizon and find ourselves gazing at old hatreds seeded and watered by forgetfulness and flowering into new wars. New massacres. New monsters like die Jägerin. Let this wheel stop. Let us not forget this time. Let us remember. Quinn’s characters are also vibrantly human—driven by passion, duty and humanizing, terrifying flaws—and the third-person narration alternates seamlessly between Jordan, Ian and Nina. There’s such a gravity to Ian Graham’s character. The war had burned his youth away, but the best parts of him had not been chipped away and sanded down to a hard callous. Ian is tough yet vulnerable, prickly yet charismatic, but for all his appearance of amiable, obdurate stability, he is actually a reckless, wildly erratic character. Ian’s shoulders strained to heft the weight of his grief-sprung rage; he wouldn’t let his brother become just a name in a casualty ledger, and he is willing to use up every ounce of his energy in this colossal, incessant yearning for justice. He's given up on writing; “see enough horrors, the words run out,” says Ian. But it still pounded through him, hot as blood—the hunt. Ian's hands tingled with it. And that’s where the lines of red he’s marked in his mind’s eye to keep his job from straying into “personal vendetta” territory begin to dim and wither. Was it still justice Ian sought so arduously or was it just a mask his impotent rage, fierce and red, has worn? This question underpins a large part of Ian’s characterization, and it’s quite arresting to read about. Nina’s character is animated by a spiky, dangerous energy, and the slow but deft way Quinn peels back the hidden layers of her character is very compelling. Nina’s memory of the war, the woman she so fiercely loved, and that terrible encounter with the Huntress by the river is still pounding in her mind. There was a wildness to her, of hope and terror, that held its own allure. Nina is not easily frightened. She has never has been. Growing up with an abusive, drunkard of a father, Nina has only allowed herself one fear—a beseeching terror born the day he tried to drown her and she escaped.  From that day forward, other fears have become for other people, not for her. There’s a scene towards the end where we witness Nina leap at her fear’s throat and conquer it that held me quite literally at the edge of my seat. Ian and Nina are united more tightly than ever in their condemnation of the Huntress. For most of the book, Ian is simply too wary of Nina to look away, the rodent watching the pacing cat. Nina recognizes the hunger that lays concealed in Ian—the kind that you can’t find a way to cheat or break: the one that made him “go to war with a typewriter instead of a gun” and not count the cost, and prompted her to seek a life of soaring into the sky like a wind-borne flower. I really loved their dynamics—how they rubbed their rough edges smooth against each other. Nina had molded too much of herself into cool marble, and Ian did not want her to shatter. Into the guarded world of her heart, he wished to enter, hoping that, one day, she’d feel for him some glimmer of what she felt for “her dark-eyed Moscow rose.” There is also a stark vividness to Jordan's character, as the girl who wouldn't yield any of her dreams and ambitions. Although the way her doubts about Annaliese never caught flight—and the way her thoughts kept eddying out for most of the novel, too fast to grab hold of, conclusions always out of reach—often strained credulity, I enjoyed reading her POVs. Tony was also such a fun presence, handsome and relentlessly charming, and his friendship with Ian had warmth as fire does (even when they bicker as old, married couples do.) Battered souls like ours, Ian thought, tramping out of the wreckage of wars, always have guilt. Ghosts. Lakes and parachutes. Overall, this is a novel not to be missed! Highly recommended! 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  3. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    "They called her die Jagerin-the Huntress. She was the young mistress of an SS officer in German-occupied Poland, the hostess of grand parties on the lake, a keen shot. Perhaps she was the rusalka the lake was named for-a lethal, malevolent water spirit." Here lies Chelsea, dead from a book slump brought on by The Huntress, because for once the hype lived up to my expectations and the book's execution. I'm not an avid reader of historical fiction, and in the past year I decided that I was taking "They called her die Jagerin-the Huntress. She was the young mistress of an SS officer in German-occupied Poland, the hostess of grand parties on the lake, a keen shot. Perhaps she was the rusalka the lake was named for-a lethal, malevolent water spirit." Here lies Chelsea, dead from a book slump brought on by The Huntress, because for once the hype lived up to my expectations and the book's execution. I'm not an avid reader of historical fiction, and in the past year I decided that I was taking a break from WWII fiction, due to the saturation and burnout I was feeling in the genre, but this is mostly post WWII fiction, so it doesn't count. Right? RIGHT. After seeing so many rave review surrounding The Hunty, I was cautiously optimistic that this would be an enjoyable read, but friends, this was a mind-blowing masterpiece. "Lake Rusalka: a lake in Poland named for a creature of the night, and during the darkest years of the war, a woman lived on her shores far more fearful than any witch who crawled from a lake's depths." The beauty of this novel is that it carries a powerful current of suspense without masquerading as a whodunnit. You know from the very beginning who has done what, but the format in which the author chooses to let the story unfold is profound, intoxicating, and dare I say more efficient than if she had tried to make any of the reveals embedded in the characters's identities. Multiple POVs, three to be exact, keep the pace moving quickly, and we are given bits of information from each angle, which plays out to be a beautiful weaving of many lives affected by a single monster of a woman. Not only are we privy to this tangling of fates, but inserted we have rich development of the hunting team and well as lush, atmospheric descriptions of the multiple settings, past and present. "What about the Huntress? She vanished at the war's end. She was not worth pursuing-a woman with the blood of only a dozen or so on her hands, when there were the murderers of millions to be found. There were many like her-small fish, not worth catching. Where will they go? Where did she go? And will anyone take up the hunt?" Of the many fabulous characters, Nina was my favorite protagonist, and that's a tough choice because they were all wonderfully flawed. But Nina, oh Nina, that woman has my heart. Talk about a complex, strong female who has no patience for laziness, yet shows her vulnerabilities in her own ways. I also felt that the character of the Huntress was one of the better villains I've read to date, and quite possibly the most excellent female monsters to grace the pages of a novel. Die Jagerin is truly a monster, but Quinn has given her so many dimensions and, most importantly, she has given her a horrific cause that she believes in with every fiber of her being. The moments she crafts between her and the other characters, especially Jordan, give an unsettling conflict that causes the reader to wrestle with the Huntress's disgusting "calling" and her humanity, emotion, and weakness. When an author can cause me to stop and ponder my feelings toward a monster, that is the telling of an excellent story. Fellow readers, I highly recommend you pick this one up, even if you aren't traditionally a fan of historical fiction. This one reads much more like a thriller; the beginning sets the stage and carries forth with an initial slow burn that develops into a full-blown compulsive page turner. I can see that this will easily be one of the top 10 novels of 2019 that I read, as it checked all the boxes for me, and I hope if you choose to read it as well, that you'll acquire your own precious experience with these characters. *I received a review copy via the publisher.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dorie - Traveling Sister :)

    ***NOW AVAILABLE, I LOVE THIS AUTHOR*** This was going to be a 4+ star read until the ending, wow that bumped it up to 5+ stars!!! The authors notes at the end of the book are just as interesting to read as the book. Knowing that much of the book is based on actual events and real people made the book come alive for me that much more. From the blurb you know that there is a team that is still hunting Nazi war criminals even after the Nuremberg trials. We are now in the late 1940’s and it’s gettin ***NOW AVAILABLE, I LOVE THIS AUTHOR*** This was going to be a 4+ star read until the ending, wow that bumped it up to 5+ stars!!! The authors notes at the end of the book are just as interesting to read as the book. Knowing that much of the book is based on actual events and real people made the book come alive for me that much more. From the blurb you know that there is a team that is still hunting Nazi war criminals even after the Nuremberg trials. We are now in the late 1940’s and it’s getting harder and harder to find survivors who can identify the Nazi SS who committed the more horrendous acts. Ian is a former British war correspondent who has teamed up with Tony a former US soldier working in a small office in Vienna trying to find information on Nazi’s who have fled and are hiding in Europe and now the US. Nina is a former Russian fighter pilot, their regiment was called “The Night Witches” because their planes descended so silently that the Germans on the ground didn’t hear them coming until they had dropped their bombs. These women were young and fierce and did as many as 8 to 10 runs a night, in planes made of wood and fabric, with an open cockpit! Nina met Tony when she was recuperating at a hospital, but I will leave that story for you to discover. I found Nina’s story to be mesmerizing, what heroes these women were! The Soviets were the only air force that used women pilots. Ian’s and Tony’s next target is a woman SS soldier who was known as “The Huntress”, she showed no mercy, killing hundreds of innocent people including many children. Nina will team up with Tony and Ian to find her. Both Nina and Ian have personal reasons for bringing justice to “The Huntress”, they are prepared to do whatever it takes to hunt her down. A quote from Nina “Die Jagerin (The Huntress) She kills because she likes it, and she hunts what she thinks are easy targets--children, people on the run, those who can’t fight her”. Jordan is a young woman of about 18 living in the United States. She helps her father run an antique shop in Boston but is an avid photographer. Though she has a serious boyfriend, later fiance, she still has hopes of making photography her lifelong passion. Her father meets a German woman whom he starts to seriously date, she has a young daughter, Ruth. Jordan isn’t sure why but she doesn’t trust this woman, Anneliese. Her 4 year old daughter. Ruth, has nightmares that can’t be explained. It is obvious that the little girl has suffered some trauma in her life. All of these storylines are woven together wonderfully, from one character to another, from past to present until they become one, fantastic writing! This is wonderful historical fiction with a great plot to immerse yourself in. I found the ending to be exciting, satisfying and memorable. Kate Quinn has written another winner, I would recommend this book to any fan of historical fiction! This was a Traveling Sister read. I received an ARC of this novel from the publisher through Edelweiss.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth *Traveling Sister*

    4.5 stars rounded up! Ian, Tony, and Nina join forces to track the Huntress. Nina was a Russian Bomber Pilot. The Huntress was a Nazi War criminal. In the aftermath of the war Hunter becomes the hunted. Nina gambled everything to join the Night Witches, which is an all female night bomber regiment wrecking havoc on Hitler's eastern front. But when she is thrown across the path of a lethal Nazi murderess known as the huntress, Nina must use all her wits to survive. Jordan McBride is seventeen yea 4.5 stars rounded up! Ian, Tony, and Nina join forces to track the Huntress. Nina was a Russian Bomber Pilot. The Huntress was a Nazi War criminal. In the aftermath of the war Hunter becomes the hunted. Nina gambled everything to join the Night Witches, which is an all female night bomber regiment wrecking havoc on Hitler's eastern front. But when she is thrown across the path of a lethal Nazi murderess known as the huntress, Nina must use all her wits to survive. Jordan McBride is seventeen years old and grows up in Post WWII Boston. She is determined to become a photographer. Her father brings home a fiance and Jordan thinks that she is hiding something. Jordan has to look into her past and what she finds may threaten all she holds dear. She realizes that there are mysteries buried deep. This was a historical fiction novel and I just love this genre. I loved the descriptions of the 1940's and 1950's Era and felt like I was there. The author did a great job researching this. I loved the author's writing style. I loved The Night Witches and the bonding of the sisters. They were bad asses. I fell in love with the characters. They were so well developed. I thought the author brought them to life. I loved the dynamics. My favorite character was Nina. She was bold, reckless, daring and very brave. She feared nothing. I also loved the Rusalka. The huntress was a monster. She was just plain evil and a mystery. She was also a coward. I loved the revenge against her. It was just so clever. I loved Jordan too. I just loved the ending. It was just amazing. It was gripping, nailbiting, and so suspenseful. My heart was pounding and I had to come up for air. Wow! This one is one of my favorite historical fiction novel for this year so far. I can't wait to read The Alice Network! This was a Traveling Sister Read and it was a great and fun discussion. I want to thank Netgalley, William Morrow, and Kate Quinn for the copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay - Traveling Sister

    2 stars. I simply couldn’t connect with this book. This novel revolves around a Russian female bomber pilot and a British war reporter who work together as Nazi hunters. Their main goal is to track down “The Huntress” a notorious Nazi war criminal who is said to have taken on a new identity living in the USA. I am the outlier with my feelings on this novel. I had the same disappointment happen with the author’s previous book, The Alice Network. My biggest issue was the characters - they lacked au 2 stars. I simply couldn’t connect with this book. This novel revolves around a Russian female bomber pilot and a British war reporter who work together as Nazi hunters. Their main goal is to track down “The Huntress” a notorious Nazi war criminal who is said to have taken on a new identity living in the USA. I am the outlier with my feelings on this novel. I had the same disappointment happen with the author’s previous book, The Alice Network. My biggest issue was the characters - they lacked authenticity. The dialogue and demeanor of the characters didn’t have natural ease making many situations feel forced and awkward. Unfortunately, my disconnect with the characters completely overshadowed any enjoyment I may have attained from learning about this time in our history. I read this with the Traveling Sisters and I was the only one who felt this way. I am thrilled that they all loved this one and I urge you to read the numerous raving reviews out there before deciding on this one. Check out our blog that features the variety of our opinions on this at: https://twosisterslostinacoulee.com/2... I think this comes down to me simply not being the right reader for this author. Thank you to Edelweiss, William Morrow and Kate Quinn for providing me with an ARC to read and review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angela M

    I wanted to read this because I really enjoyed The Alice Network by Kate Quinn. I loved reading about the women of a spy network, who played important and dangerous roles in WWI that I had never heard about. These women were not in my history textbooks. In this novel, Quinn has given us another story of courageous women, this time depicting the role of the Russian women flyers, known as Night Witches who flew planes and bombed Nazis during WWII. I had no knowledge of these courageous women eithe I wanted to read this because I really enjoyed The Alice Network by Kate Quinn. I loved reading about the women of a spy network, who played important and dangerous roles in WWI that I had never heard about. These women were not in my history textbooks. In this novel, Quinn has given us another story of courageous women, this time depicting the role of the Russian women flyers, known as Night Witches who flew planes and bombed Nazis during WWII. I had no knowledge of these courageous women either, so I’m grateful that Quinn has enlightened me through these novels. While this is a work of fiction, it is well researched and I appreciate that we are told about the real individuals that these characters are based on as well as the actual events. This story is not perfect. It’s a little too long and a predictable romantic thread diluted the story for me some. Having said that, I was especially drawn into the story of Nina Markova, one of the Russian bombers. She crosses paths with “ die Jagerin, the Huntress, the young mistress of an SS officer in German-occupied Poland” capable of unspeakable violence against women and children. With a connection to Ian Graham who has lost a young brother in the war and to the younger brother, Nina joins forces with Ian in his work at The Vienna Refugee Documentation Center. Ian, a former war correspondent now working to find Nazi war criminals and bring about justice. The chase to hunt down the Huntress takes them to America and it held my interest until the very end. The narrative moves around in time until a satisfying ending. A very good work of historical fiction, in spite of a shortcoming for me in the story line. I received an advanced copy of this book from William Morrow/HarperCollins through Edelweiss.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    I had such a hard time with this novel, kept putting it down, picking it back up, finally finished with mixed feelings. What I liked: All the parts that pertain to Nina, she was by far my favorite character. Reading about the Russian women and their piloting adventures. The amount of research that went into this book, which is detailed in the authors note. Also appreciate said note, telling the reader was was factual and what was not. What I had difficulties with. The present day story, Jordan and he I had such a hard time with this novel, kept putting it down, picking it back up, finally finished with mixed feelings. What I liked: All the parts that pertain to Nina, she was by far my favorite character. Reading about the Russian women and their piloting adventures. The amount of research that went into this book, which is detailed in the authors note. Also appreciate said note, telling the reader was was factual and what was not. What I had difficulties with. The present day story, Jordan and her family. Just seemed trite after the intensity of the other chapters. Never quite bought into those parts of the story. The length, this was much to long, longer than I wanted it to be. Other reviewers loved this, didn't have the same reactions I had. Best always if you have an interest to read yourself and form your own opinions. ARC from Netgalley.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    This is my first book from Kate Quinn, and it definitely will not be my last! Nina Markova. Wait until you meet her. She is born in Soviet Russia, and she’s fearless. When World War II is looming and about to knock on her front door, she joins the Night Witches, a group of all-female bombers. Nina is shot down behind enemy lines and crosses paths with the Huntress, a Nazi with the worst reputation for murder you can possibly imagine. Ian Graham. He’s a British war correspondent present from Omaha This is my first book from Kate Quinn, and it definitely will not be my last! Nina Markova. Wait until you meet her. She is born in Soviet Russia, and she’s fearless. When World War II is looming and about to knock on her front door, she joins the Night Witches, a group of all-female bombers. Nina is shot down behind enemy lines and crosses paths with the Huntress, a Nazi with the worst reputation for murder you can possibly imagine. Ian Graham. He’s a British war correspondent present from Omaha Beach to the Nuremberg Trials. He leaves his life of journalism behind to hunt Nazis who have escaped persecution, and who is the most elusive on his target list? The Huntress. Nina and Ian join up to find the Huntress. Jordan McBride. A seventeen-year-old living in post WWII Boston. She’s drawn to photography even though everyone in her family discourages her. Her mother passed away years ago, and when her father brings home a fiancée, Jordan finds the German woman unsettling and secretive. Jordan uses her camera to find out where her new stepmother comes from and what secrets she may be hiding from her past. Overall, I found The Huntress to be original and heart pounding. Of all the WWII stories I’ve read, I had not heard of the Huntress. I also was fascinated with the Night Witches’ work, and I adored all the characters. This book has something for everyone with its engaging mystery, touch of romance, and riveting plot. I thoroughly enjoyed the adventure of reading this novel. I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own. My reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    5+++ stars Well, I have my first serious contender to The Heart’s Invisible Furies as my book of 2019. I loved Ms. Quinn’s The Alice Network, but The Huntress is simply brilliant! Three alternating narrators tell the story. We have Ian Graham, a troubled British war correspondent who after the war turns his mission into bringing war criminals to justice. Then there is Nina Markova, my favorite character by far. Nina is a lost soul until she fights her way into becoming a member of the Soviet all w 5+++ stars Well, I have my first serious contender to The Heart’s Invisible Furies as my book of 2019. I loved Ms. Quinn’s The Alice Network, but The Huntress is simply brilliant! Three alternating narrators tell the story. We have Ian Graham, a troubled British war correspondent who after the war turns his mission into bringing war criminals to justice. Then there is Nina Markova, my favorite character by far. Nina is a lost soul until she fights her way into becoming a member of the Soviet all women’s night bomber regiment, nicknamed The Night Witches by the Nazis. Nina’s passion, brashness, toughness, and zeal are second to none. Our third main character is Jordan, a young American woman who is inspired to become a professional photographer as opposed to the usual routine of marrying young and having lots of babies. These character’s stories eventually merge as Nina and Ian come to America to search for The Huntress—a Nazi war criminal who performs many unthinkable acts before disappearing underground across the pond. There are many things to love about this story. What enthralled me most was the character of Nina Markova. I thought she was brilliantly portrayed. Secondly, I seek to learn when I read historical fiction, and this book is a terrific introduction to the Soviet women aviators who were the only female flyers in the air during WWII. How brave these women were! Their courage, sense of teamwork and love for each other are inspirational. The multiple themes of the book are wonderful: The brutality of the war, its fallout, and how our characters cope. The concept of teamwork, and how much more one can accomplish with compromise. When to go all in on goals and when to let them go. When to realize there is a better way. When to stick with a lover and when to fold. What is forgivable and what isn’t. I could go on and on. I found much suspense in this tale, particularly in the latter part of the novel. The tension had me riveted, and I ended up totally off schedule in my real life. Oh, and in the middle of the book there is a nod to The Alice network, a nice touch for those who have read that book. The only negative thing I can say it that for the first half of the book I had a bit of a hard time reconciling the Nina of the early 40s with the Nina of 1950, but that faded away. Not a bad enough demerit to drop my rating. I always appreciate a good epilogue and this book has one. Plus a mini “post-epilogue epilogue” at the end. And don’t pass by the Author’s Note at the end end. All in all, this was a glorious read for me. No historical fiction fan of World War II stories will want to miss The Huntress. I would love to see some type of sequel with these characters. I see how it could be entirely possible if the author wants to grab the baton and run with it. Are you listening Ms. Quinn? Many thanks to the Hennepin County library and the Libby app for loaning me an e-copy of this novel.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Holly B

    This was my first novel by this author and I can see why she is a popular author. The research she did is evident and she included a very detailed account of the "Night Witches", an all female group of pilots who flew for Russia.   The bomber pilot is Nina Markova , she teams up with Ian who is a journalist who is out to catch a Nazi war criminal, known as "the Huntess". He has personal reasons for wanting to bring her to justice. Jordan is a seventeen year old living in Boston, who gets entangled This was my first novel by this author and I can see why she is a popular author. The research she did is evident and she included a very detailed account of the "Night Witches", an all female group of pilots who flew for Russia.   The bomber pilot is Nina Markova , she teams up with Ian who is a journalist who is out to catch a Nazi war criminal, known as "the Huntess". He has personal reasons for wanting to bring her to justice. Jordan is a seventeen year old living in Boston, who gets entangled in the efforts of the Nazi hunters. She has suspicions of her father's German fiancée and when she captures an image on her camera, it "haunts" her and gives her a feeling of uneasiness. Things do escalate as Jordan digs for the truth. I enjoyed Jordan's chapters the most and felt Nina's were almost too detailed to hold my attention and the book is a longer read. The suspense was spiked as the team closed in on the hunted.  Thanks so much to the publisher and EW for a review copy. Book comes out in Feb. 2019

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Kate Quinn knows how to do historical fiction. The Alice Network was one of my favorite reads of 2018. And this book matches it. Five big stars! I want a book that explores unknown areas of history. Here, it is the Nazi hunters, those that track down the villains of WWII. In this case, the hunted was once known as The Huntress. She was the mistress of an SS officer who took her own delight in killing Jewish women and children. She’s tracked by a former newspaper correspondent and a female Russian Kate Quinn knows how to do historical fiction. The Alice Network was one of my favorite reads of 2018. And this book matches it. Five big stars! I want a book that explores unknown areas of history. Here, it is the Nazi hunters, those that track down the villains of WWII. In this case, the hunted was once known as The Huntress. She was the mistress of an SS officer who took her own delight in killing Jewish women and children. She’s tracked by a former newspaper correspondent and a female Russian bomber pilot who was downed behind enemy lines and survived an encounter with the Huntress, both of whom have personal reasons for going after her. Quinn does a great job of exploring the attitude of everyone after the war, not just the losers, but Americans also, that desire to put it all behind them. I adored Nina. She might be a bit of a cliche of what we think Russians are like, but damn she was wonderful. You always hear the phrase that someone cusses like a sailor, but Nina would have you believe the phrase should be cussing like a pilot. And who exactly here is The Huntress? As Nina says, there are soldiers and there are hunters. At the end of the war, soldiers go home and hunters, lacking that thing that says stop, look for the next thing to hunt. “Soldiers get made. Hunters get born. You either need to track danger, or you don't.” Quinn also totally captures a photographer’s eye so Jordan rings true. Not just the eye that gets the shot but the eye that sees the minute expression that soon passes. Quinn raises some interesting questions here. I loved that Anneleise is not the typical psychopath. This book had me totally engaged. Such wonderful pacing and tension. While Jordan’s story starts off the slowest, by the end, I wanted to know exactly how it was all going to come together. I couldn’t turn the pages fast enough. And don’t bypass the author’s note which is fascinating.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    The most engrossing portion of this novel centers on Nina who is one of the Soviet Night Witches during WWII. The Night Witches is a moniker for the 588th Night Bomber Regiment consisting of all female members. Since their planes only held two bombs, these night flyers flew more than eight missions per night to harass and precision bomb the German military. Riveting stuff. Nina has a potentially deadly encounter with “The Huntress” and eventually winds up pursuing her with dedicated Nazi Hunters The most engrossing portion of this novel centers on Nina who is one of the Soviet Night Witches during WWII. The Night Witches is a moniker for the 588th Night Bomber Regiment consisting of all female members. Since their planes only held two bombs, these night flyers flew more than eight missions per night to harass and precision bomb the German military. Riveting stuff. Nina has a potentially deadly encounter with “The Huntress” and eventually winds up pursuing her with dedicated Nazi Hunters. Nazi hunting proves to be a tedious endeavor with a great deal of painstaking cross referencing lists and working against governments and countries no longer interested in pursuing free Nazis post Nuremberg. The Huntress has committed an atrocity but her reasons are never clear other than that “she likes it.” So, I was left thinking about her motivation. Is she an average German committing the incomprehensible out of Nazi Party zeal or is it simply that her murderous nature is given free reign due to the Nazis being in power? Either way what she does is beyond monstrous.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brenda - Host of Traveling Sisters & Friends

    A trio of Nazi hunters, a lethal Nazi murder, a Russian bomber pilot and a gentle and quiet family where something just doesn’t seem right. The Huntress is a suspenseful, exciting, compelling vividly written story that explores justice with a hint of romance to warm your heart. The hunter becomes the hunted in this. Kate Quinn does a fantastic job here weaving three storylines together and throughout the story, my favorite changed as I read each one. A trio of Nazi hunters are on a search to captu A trio of Nazi hunters, a lethal Nazi murder, a Russian bomber pilot and a gentle and quiet family where something just doesn’t seem right. The Huntress is a suspenseful, exciting, compelling vividly written story that explores justice with a hint of romance to warm your heart. The hunter becomes the hunted in this. Kate Quinn does a fantastic job here weaving three storylines together and throughout the story, my favorite changed as I read each one. A trio of Nazi hunters are on a search to capture the ruthless Nazi murderer who committed unspeakable war crimes. The hunter becomes the hunted. Each hunter has their reasons and is obsessed with finding The Huntress and each have their different ways of getting their revenge. Kate Quinn does such a great job creating some interesting and exciting characters with some of them based on real people. She vividly captures the spirit of the team of Russian bombers called the Night Witches and brings them alive for us. My favorite character became bomber Nina Markova and I couldn’t get enough of her character. She is smart, bold, dangerously courageous and ferocious making her terrifying at times in her own way. A bit high on drama and it does take on a bit of a climatic feel to it and is a bit longer than it needs to be. This did affect the way Lindsay felt about the story and it was hard for her to connect to the characters. This affected her enjoyment of the story. The ending comes together so well. It’s a vivid tense climatic showdown that took my breath away. I was reading it so fast I had to slow myself down to take it all in. I highly recommend. Thank you to HarperCollins Canada, William Morrow Books for my copy to read and review For more thoughts from the Traveling Sisters https://twosisterslostinacoulee.com/2...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Niezgoda

    OH MY GOD YES! 5 STARS! A perfect blend of historical fiction and crime solving. Synopsis: Ian Graham used to be a British war correspondent. But after 15 years of writing, he needed to “do” rather than tell; so he started an independent business hunting Nazi leaders and bringing them to justice. His most elusive target remains. She’s known as the Huntress. And he has a personal vendetta against her. Then you have Nina who, unfortunately, witnessed the Huntress’ lethal crimes. She barely survive OH MY GOD YES! 5 STARS! A perfect blend of historical fiction and crime solving. Synopsis: Ian Graham used to be a British war correspondent. But after 15 years of writing, he needed to “do” rather than tell; so he started an independent business hunting Nazi leaders and bringing them to justice. His most elusive target remains. She’s known as the Huntress. And he has a personal vendetta against her. Then you have Nina who, unfortunately, witnessed the Huntress’ lethal crimes. She barely survived as a prisoner of war and now joins forces with Ian to locate their target. And lastly, there's Jordan, a 17-year-old Bostonian. Her dad has been widowed for years and has finally found love again. But something is off about her dad’s new love interest. As their relationship turns toward marriage, Jordan starts to dig into her future stepmom’s past. What she finds could shatter everything. Review: HOLY CRAP! This was brilliant. Kate Quinn was masterful in weaving three distinct perspectives into one plot. Everything written was necessary. I found that I craved the backstories of Nina, Ian, and Jordan. It helped tremendously in building their individual pursuits. I don't think this plotline would have been successful otherwise. They all had one objective - justice. Jordan's tethered on the need to know the truth, while Ian and Nina wanted to avenge Seb. I immediately connected to Jordan's subplot. Her story is very coming of age - defining her path in life outside of just being a bride. I loved it. I loved her tenacity and curiosity. She set the "detective" air in motion from the get-go. But I found myself rooting for Nina most. Her tough, reckless exterior is so apparent that when you see glimmers of raw emotion escape her, you truly have a visceral reaction. She was magic. Ian is the backbone. He was the glue that brought everyone together and kept the story emotionally engaging. His pain is real and his need for community is pure. Tony is a terrific supporting character. I adored him. He was a breath of fresh air when all the tensions were high. The dynamic would be so different if he wasn't a part of this. God, the ending! It was so suspenseful, noble, unrushed, and real. The tie in with the Rusalka was fantastic. Again, Nina was the star! PLEASE GO READ THIS. It's utterly worth it! My review is sparse because I don't want to spoil anything!! PS. Please tell me that there are some of you begging for a sequel?!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Warning: before you start this book, you need to clear your calendar and turn your phone off. You will not want to be interrupted until you get to the end. This book has it all - fantastic characters that you care about, a plot that will keep the tension high, some laughter and even more tears. This book takes place in the early 1950s with some flashbacks to WWII. The war is over but everyone knows that there are still former Nazis hiding all over the world. Ian, a British war reporter and his fr Warning: before you start this book, you need to clear your calendar and turn your phone off. You will not want to be interrupted until you get to the end. This book has it all - fantastic characters that you care about, a plot that will keep the tension high, some laughter and even more tears. This book takes place in the early 1950s with some flashbacks to WWII. The war is over but everyone knows that there are still former Nazis hiding all over the world. Ian, a British war reporter and his friend Tony are tracking down Nazis and have a special interest in The Huntress, the lover of an SS officer, she shot several young children for fun near the end of the war. They are helped by Nina who can identify the Huntress due to a run in with her. Nina's story is so exciting - she was a member of the Soviet Night Witches - an all female group of night bombers who bombed Hitler's armies on the Eastern front. The third main character is Jordan who lives in Boston with her father and wants to be a famous photographer. She is thrilled when her widowed father meets and marries a German woman but can't help but think she is hiding something. Ian, Nina and Jordan are all from totally different worlds but their stories collide as they all try to find the woman who affected their lives so strongly. I loved the way all of their stories were brought together at the end of the novel. This is a fantastic novel with characters I won't soon forget. Nina is armed with a straight razor, Ian with his words and Jordan with her camera as they attempt to find the Huntress and bring her to justice. You'll be cheering them on as attempt to bring this evil woman to be punished for her crimes. Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    A journalist, a lawyer and a Russian woman pilot are teaming up to find the one of the ruthless, dangerous Nazi war criminal Huntress to bring back the justice. This is breathtaking, compulsive, fantastic journey with amazing and memorable characters. My all time favorites are Nina Markova curses like a sailor, flies like a bird in the air, powerful, vivid, feverish, fearless pilot. She is a great portrait of a night witch hunter! And Jordan, young but so smart, talented photographer,50’s version A journalist, a lawyer and a Russian woman pilot are teaming up to find the one of the ruthless, dangerous Nazi war criminal Huntress to bring back the justice. This is breathtaking, compulsive, fantastic journey with amazing and memorable characters. My all time favorites are Nina Markova curses like a sailor, flies like a bird in the air, powerful, vivid, feverish, fearless pilot. She is a great portrait of a night witch hunter! And Jordan, young but so smart, talented photographer,50’s version of Nancy Drew! It’s a great combination of historical thriller and romance genres! I always adore the books with strong, disobedient heroines! And also the villain, huntress who was a great portrait of relentless, merciless, cold blooded child killer Annalise gave me so much creeps. She was depicted so real, so naturally that makes you think you’re reading a biography about real-time war criminal. Don’t forget the satisfying, exciting finale reminds you of old Hitchcock spy/ thriller movies! So happy to read this book and can’t wait to read Alice Network and other books of this author.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Author Interview: http://historicalfictionreader.blogsp... Find this and other reviews at: http://historicalfictionreader.blogsp... Have you ever picked up a book and known before even cracking it open that you’re going to love it? That at some point, you’re going to fall through the pages of the text and be lost in the imagination of truly gifted storyteller? That’s how I feel every time I acquire a novel by Kate Quinn and The Huntress was no exception. Be it the functional operation of a camera, Author Interview: http://historicalfictionreader.blogsp... Find this and other reviews at: http://historicalfictionreader.blogsp... Have you ever picked up a book and known before even cracking it open that you’re going to love it? That at some point, you’re going to fall through the pages of the text and be lost in the imagination of truly gifted storyteller? That’s how I feel every time I acquire a novel by Kate Quinn and The Huntress was no exception. Be it the functional operation of a camera, a well-placed Russian expletive, the batting line-up of 1951 Boston Red Sox, or the sensation of cutting through the clouds in the cockpit of a biplane, no detail is too small for Quinn’s discerning eye. I’m willing to bet there are many readers who won't care a whit that Anna can drop her R’s like a Bostonian and won't give two cents for the mythological symmetry in Quinn’s referenced lake spirits, but I find such detail truly appealing and think it contributes a great deal to the immersive quality of the narrative. Thematically speaking, the Nazi hunters’ pursuit of justice is thrilling enough and might have proved captivating on its own, but Quinn’s decision to pair it with the emotional scars the war left on those who survived it took my breath away. Ian, Nina, and even Anna carry a great deal of baggage and I found something very raw and authentic in how each tries to move forward in the post-war years. Though they are not called out in the jacket description, I feel the romantic elements of the story are worthy of note. Ian’s falling in love with his own spouse touched my heart, but it was the relationship between Nina and Yelena that captured my attention. The passion and dedication that brings them together are astounding, but I felt the course of their story deeply both perceptive and poignant. In sum, Quinn writes on a level few can match and The Huntress illustrates it every way. Be it the audacity of the Night Witches, the unsung heroism of war correspondents or the boldness of those who sought to rectify injustice while the world tried to forget the horrors of WWII, this book touches it all. A fast-paced and thrilling tale that captivates from the first page to the last.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan Meissner

    I had the distinct pleasure of reading an early copy for a cover quote and I was taken in from page one hook, line and sinker. Expertly researched, perfectly constructed, this is a riveting dual-time periods read. Kate Quinn excels in transporting the reader back in time, without so much as a bump or wrinkle or awkward yank. She's one of the reasons why so many people love historical fiction. If you loved THE ALICE NETWORK, you'll want to grab this one when it hits bookstore shelves.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Scene: Fictional situation Me: Oh my goodness! I just read the most wonderful book! Friend: Would I want to read it? Me: Yes! Read it! A long time fan of Kate Quinn, all of her books are worth your time. Emperors of Rome, the Borgias, World Wars, not to mention some great collaborations with other historical fiction writers- she's great at it all! Friend(eyebrows raised) : What's it about? Me: This one is narrated by a Russian bomber pilot who was part of the female regiment coined by the enemy Scene: Fictional situation Me: Oh my goodness! I just read the most wonderful book! Friend: Would I want to read it? Me: Yes! Read it! A long time fan of Kate Quinn, all of her books are worth your time. Emperors of Rome, the Borgias, World Wars, not to mention some great collaborations with other historical fiction writers- she's great at it all! Friend(eyebrows raised) : What's it about? Me: This one is narrated by a Russian bomber pilot who was part of the female regiment coined by the enemy as Night Witches, a Nazi hunter, and a young American woman who aspires to be a photographer and believes someone close to her is keeping dangerous secrets. Read it! Friend: Is this another depressing WWII book? Me(impatient): Well, it covers before, during , and after WWII. But the backstories of these characters were fascinating and each narrator held their own. It was REALLY difficult to say which character I was the most drawn to, but quite possibly I adored Nina the most. OMG! Read it! Friend: It looks thick. Will I have time to read it? Me: Yes, just ignore everything and everyone. It works for me! It's only 500+ pages. The author's note is great and offers a really lengthy list of other books to check out after reading this one. *Friend reaches for book* Me: Wait, what are you doing ? Friend(confused): Didn't you want me to read it? Me( more than just slightly astonished):Yes, but I wanted you to have your own. Friend: I don't understand.. Me( clutching book and running for home) Now available in various formats. JUST READ IT! Thanks to my friend and colleague Beth for not running away from me when I said I wanted to read this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Overall: I loved this book! An obsessively readable historical novel told in three storylines about courageous women who dare to break the mold of what is expected of them. I loved the characters, the story, learned a lot, and overall just great reading and could not put this down. Even better than The Alice Network. 9/10 The Good: This novel is told in three storylines and focused on the time before, during, and after WWII. At the center of “The Huntress” is Die Jägerin, a woman accused of commi Overall: I loved this book! An obsessively readable historical novel told in three storylines about courageous women who dare to break the mold of what is expected of them. I loved the characters, the story, learned a lot, and overall just great reading and could not put this down. Even better than The Alice Network. 9/10 The Good: This novel is told in three storylines and focused on the time before, during, and after WWII. At the center of “The Huntress” is Die Jägerin, a woman accused of committing unspeakable war crimes against children in Poland during World War II. The novel begins with this unnamed woman on the run, and then breaks into the different story lines. The three storyines are Nina, Jordan, and Ian. Nina Markova is a “Night Witch,” a famed group of all Russian female bomber pilots during WWII. Her storyline follows for the longest period of time and was my favorite. She is fierce, brace, unstoppable, and a true force to be reckoned with, absolutely loved her character. I did not know anything about the Night Witches so was entranced with this story from the beginning. Jordan McBride is an aspiring photographer living in Boston during the 1950s. Ian Graham is a former war correspondent that is obsessed with bringing Nazi war criminals to justice. The depth and development of all these characters is brilliant and Quinn does an even better job at interconnecting all three storylines. The author’s note at the end of the book does a great job detailing the many characters that are based on real people and the history behind it. I was very surprised at how many Nazi war criminals escaped to the United States after the war and were able to live in peace. Not only is Die Jägerin (The Huntress) based on real women, but so are the other characters and these are all areas of the war I knew little about. The Bad: Ian’s storyline was a bit weaker than the other two, but still positive and important in the development of the novel. Some may say the novel was a bit long (though I appreciated this because I did not want it to end) but after reading the author’s note, it made more sense why some details were expanded on more. Favorite Quotes: “Because we can keep on. Others, they try keeping on, they just...” she mimed an explosion. “It’s too much for them. They come to pieces. Not us. Hunters, they are different. We can’t stop. Not for bad sleep or parachute dreams or people who say we should want peace and babies instead. It’s a world full of mad wolves, and we hunt them til we die.” “He knows how to look. Really look, when a woman is talking.” “Ah.” Her stepmother sighed. “Some men ogle, some men look. The first makes us bristle, and the second makes us melt, and men are at an utter loss knowing the difference. But we do, and we know it at once.” “Building a generation is like building a wall—one good well-made brick at a time, one good well-made child at a time. Enough good bricks, you have a good wall. Enough good children, you have a generation that won’t start a world-enveloping war.”

  22. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    THE HUNTRESS is the story about Nina Markova, an female Russian bomber pilot that has joined forces with Ian Graham an English journalist to hunt down a deadly Nazi murderess known as the Huntress. The Huntress managed to get away after several heinous deeds and both Nina and Ian have personal reasons for hunting her down. But how will they find someone they don't even know the name of or have a picture of? Meanwhile in Boston, Jordan McBride is getting to know the woman her father is planning t THE HUNTRESS is the story about Nina Markova, an female Russian bomber pilot that has joined forces with Ian Graham an English journalist to hunt down a deadly Nazi murderess known as the Huntress. The Huntress managed to get away after several heinous deeds and both Nina and Ian have personal reasons for hunting her down. But how will they find someone they don't even know the name of or have a picture of? Meanwhile in Boston, Jordan McBride is getting to know the woman her father is planning to marry, a German widow who seems to be the perfect woman for Jordan's father, but there is something with her that makes Jordan uneasy... READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW OVER AT FRESH FICTION!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    This was a nailbiter! I fell in love with Kate Quinn’s writing back with “The Alice Network” and was so eager to read this one. Told in dual timelines, we are treated to the perspectives of Nina, one of the Night Witches, a group of elite Soviet air force pilots—I actually had no idea women got to fly during WW2, Jordan, a teenage girl living in the US who loves photography and has concerns when her father remarries to a German woman who doesn’t seem to be entirely trustworthy, and Ian and Tony, This was a nailbiter! I fell in love with Kate Quinn’s writing back with “The Alice Network” and was so eager to read this one. Told in dual timelines, we are treated to the perspectives of Nina, one of the Night Witches, a group of elite Soviet air force pilots—I actually had no idea women got to fly during WW2, Jordan, a teenage girl living in the US who loves photography and has concerns when her father remarries to a German woman who doesn’t seem to be entirely trustworthy, and Ian and Tony, who track down war criminals. It’s a game of cat and mouse as we see Nina, Ian and Tony try to track down “The Huntress” in the years after the war. Nina is the only person who can recognize her on sight, and her crimes are brutal. You have a sense even from the first pages of who the players are and what will eventually happen, and still the fun is in watching the tension build, seeing the clues unfold, as well as the relationships in this work of historical fiction. Loved the way this worked in historical detail and period accuracy while keeping the plot moving and not letting things get bogged down. And, ack, that ending!!! Please excuse typos/name misspellings. Entered on screen reader.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chanel Cleeton

    A thoroughly immersive page-turner, The Huntress captures readers from the first page, leading them on an explosive journey that shines a spotlight on the horrors of war and the legacy it leaves for those who survive. Impeccably written, richly detailed, tautly paced, and filled with compelling and intricate characters, Quinn’s novel is both poignant and thrilling. This book will take hold of you and will stay with you long after you have finished. You don’t just read a Kate Quinn novel, you liv A thoroughly immersive page-turner, The Huntress captures readers from the first page, leading them on an explosive journey that shines a spotlight on the horrors of war and the legacy it leaves for those who survive. Impeccably written, richly detailed, tautly paced, and filled with compelling and intricate characters, Quinn’s novel is both poignant and thrilling. This book will take hold of you and will stay with you long after you have finished. You don’t just read a Kate Quinn novel, you live it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Helen Power

    Short review: I recommend this novel to anyone looking for a World War II thriller that’s mostly set after the war. It’s chock full of quirky, yet relatable characters and plenty of suspense to keep you reading past your bedtime. Full review: Synopsis Nina Markova was a female bomber pilot in World War II.  Badass, reckless, and a little crazy, Nina was a member of an infamous regiment called the Night Witches, which comprised solely of women fighter pilots.  But when Nina crosses paths with a Naz Short review: I recommend this novel to anyone looking for a World War II thriller that’s mostly set after the war. It’s chock full of quirky, yet relatable characters and plenty of suspense to keep you reading past your bedtime. Full review: Synopsis Nina Markova was a female bomber pilot in World War II.  Badass, reckless, and a little crazy, Nina was a member of an infamous regiment called the Night Witches, which comprised solely of women fighter pilots.  But when Nina crosses paths with a Nazi murderess, The Huntress, she barely manages to escape with her life.  After the war, she joins forces with Nazi hunter Ian Graham to hunt down the elusive Huntress... Plot The Huntress follows three seemingly disparate storylines across the length of the book.  Told from three unique POVs, the three stories are also set at different times - one before and then during World War II, one that begins a year after its end, and one set in 1950. Nina is a Russian pilot, and, according to the book's blurb, the main character. The novel follows her in the years before joining the Night Witches, revealing to the reader just how harsh it was to grow up in an isolated rural region in Russia. But when she joins the Night Witches, she finds her true love - the sky. Ian Graham is a former British war correspondent turned Nazi hunter. He works with his partner Tony to find and capture Nazi war criminals. After taking down numerous bad guys, he decides to target the one he's really after--the Huntress--the woman who murdered his brother. Jordan McBride is a Bostonian teenager whose father falls madly in love with a secretive German woman with a mysterious past. Her father marries this woman, Annelise, adopting her child as his own, but Jordan can't fight the sneaking suspicion that Annelise isn't quite what she seems. A burgeoning photographer, Jordan is always looking to snap pictures of her family. But why won't Annelise let her take her picture? The connections between these three characters becomes evident as the story progresses, with a couple of small twists thrown into the mix to shake things up. That said, I was expecting bigger twists in this 530 page book, but it didn't quite deliver on that front. Characters There are some common underlying themes between the three storylines.  They're each facing their fears, and maturing in their own ways.  At times, I thought Nina's character to be a little too ridiculous. She's almost the comic relief of the book, but isn't it strange to have the main character be the comic relief? That said, there's a scene where she's watching Americans play baseball, and she wonders why they have bats if they're not going to hit each other with them.  She's a lovable and intriguing character, regardless of the likelihood of her existing in real life being very very tiny. The identity of the Huntress isn't a twist in the story, and as such, I would have liked to have had some chapters from her point of view. There were already three POVs in this book, so why not add a fourth? I found the Huntress to be quite intriguing, and I would have loved to have gotten a peek into her deranged mind, even if it was only for little snippets between the three parts of the book.  In Nina's storyline, we don't get the chance to meet the Huntress until the very end, which left something to be desired. All this hype, and I didn't quite feel the fear that one should feel when confronting a psychotic, mastermind, Nazi murderess. There are also a few intriguing romances that emerge during the story. I won't say anything more--at the risk of spoiling the plot--but they added quite a bit to the reading experience and made it much more memorable than it would haven been had it just been about Nazi hunting. Language This novel is an easy read.  The plot keeps the story moving forward; however, there is a lot of backstory dumped onto readers that slows some parts down, particularly in the beginning. The chapters that follow Nina have a lot of technical talk.  There are a lot of descriptions of the planes and vague political speak.  In my opinion, it's the least thrilling of the three timelines, despite the fact that it's the one that's set during the war. Others might find the opposite, that Nina's storyline is the best of the three because of these descriptions. That's the beauty of a book like this--there's something for everyone. The book is full of rich historical references--which is what makes this novel truly unique. It's fascinating to learn about the Night Witches (who were real!) and to capture a snippet of what life was like in the 1940s and 50s.  Readers who are utterly uninterested in this time period may find that this book isn't for them, regardless of the thrills of Nazi hunting and romance. I recommend this novel to anyone looking for a World War II thriller that's mostly set after the war.  It's chock full of quirky, yet relatable characters and plenty of suspense to keep you reading past your bedtime. *Thank you to William Morrow Paperbacks and OLA Super Conference for the arc for review!* This review appeared first on https://powerlibrarian.wordpress.com/ Instagram | Blog | Website | Twitter My 2019 Reading Challenge

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Bookish

    My thanks to William Morrow for sending me a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher.  Kate Quinn has such a remarkable gift when it comes to creating seriously captivating characters. It's been almost a week since I finished reading and I keep finding myself thinking about Nina, a ruthless, Nazi-killing hellcat who probably really needs a hug. I love Nina to death, and her adoration for real-life Night Witch Marina My thanks to William Morrow for sending me a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher.  Kate Quinn has such a remarkable gift when it comes to creating seriously captivating characters. It's been almost a week since I finished reading and I keep finding myself thinking about Nina, a ruthless, Nazi-killing hellcat who probably really needs a hug. I love Nina to death, and her adoration for real-life Night Witch Marina Raskova had me wanting to learn more about these women. (If anyone knows any good documentaries, drop a link in the comments and I'll love you forever.)  At 560 pages, The Huntress is a somewhat lengthy read, and I found myself annoyed every time I had to put it down. Despite the backdrop of war and violence, the story isn't super action packed or fast-paced. It's a bit of a slow burn and very character driven. I (obviously) found Nina to be the most compelling character, but the story is told through three separate point of view characters. Nina's perspective takes place during the war, whereas Jordan and Ian's perspectives take place after, during Ian's hunt for the infamous Nazi known as The Huntress. Nina exists in both timelines, as she teams up with Ian, but her direct perspective is limited to her life leading up to the war through the first day she meets Ian. Nina comes from a remarkably dysfunctional family, with a drunken and abusive father and siblings she describes as more or less feral. She is damaged in a lot of ways, but her hardships also prepared her for the harshness of war.  Ian also made for a really compelling character. No spoilers here, but he has a personal vendetta that fuels a lot of his desire to take down The Huntress. He has a background as a war correspondent, and gives off a distinct air of survivor's guilt. He saw a lot of atrocities during his reporting on the war, and I think Quinn really nailed down the psychology of what that can do to a person. Ian, like a lot of people who has endured trauma, has internalized this idea that he hasn't fully "earned" his emotional disturbances. Soldiers fought and died on the front lines; he wrote articles about it. In the aftermath of trauma, it's sadly so common to see people downplay what happened to them, to dismiss their rights to their own feelings on the basis that someone else had it worse. Ian exemplifies this mindset and I really appreciated seeing an author portray a character like this in a way that seems to validate that struggle.  Jordan, the final POV character, is a normal young girl living in America who has her life turned upside-down by The Huntress and those who are searching for her. She has suspicions about her new step-mother early on, which she buries to keep her father happy. A lot of her story line, however, has little to do with the rest of the book. She is a budding young photographer who wants to create a career for herself in a time when women were largely expected to get married and be housewives. She sees nearly every scene as if she's looking through her camera, constantly mentally framing shots even when she doesn't have her camera with her.  I absolutely enjoyed every page of this story. Quinn's last novel, The Alice Network, was a ridiculously tough act to follow, but The Huntress did not disappoint in the slightest. This novel is an excellent choice for fans of The Lost Girls of Paris, Lilac Girls. and of course, Kate Quinn's past work.  You can read all of my reviews on my blog, Jenna Bookish! Facebook | Instagram | Tumblr

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pam Jenoff

    I was lucky enough to get an early read of The Huntress, which is sure to be one of the biggest books of 2019. In it, Quinn weaves together the stories of a British Nazi hunter, a Russian female war pilot and a 17 year old American girl who quickly realizes her stepmother isn't who she claims to be, in a hunt for one of the most ruthless women of Nazi Germany. Original and suspenseful, the Huntress is, dare I say it, even better than Quinn's epic hit, The Alice Network, so race to get it when it I was lucky enough to get an early read of The Huntress, which is sure to be one of the biggest books of 2019. In it, Quinn weaves together the stories of a British Nazi hunter, a Russian female war pilot and a 17 year old American girl who quickly realizes her stepmother isn't who she claims to be, in a hunt for one of the most ruthless women of Nazi Germany. Original and suspenseful, the Huntress is, dare I say it, even better than Quinn's epic hit, The Alice Network, so race to get it when it comes out in late February!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (Stephanie's Novel Fiction)

    I thoroughly enjoyed my first book by Kate Quinn--so much so that I immediately read The Alice Network afterward (if you haven't read it, then I recommend it too)! The Huntress is a vivid and well-researched story that takes places after World War II. Ian Graham, a famous British ex-war correspondent, and Tony Rodomovsky, a former American soldier join together after the war to find hidden Nazi war criminals and see them brought to justice. But there is one criminal who remains elusive, a Nazi mu I thoroughly enjoyed my first book by Kate Quinn--so much so that I immediately read The Alice Network afterward (if you haven't read it, then I recommend it too)! The Huntress is a vivid and well-researched story that takes places after World War II. Ian Graham, a famous British ex-war correspondent, and Tony Rodomovsky, a former American soldier join together after the war to find hidden Nazi war criminals and see them brought to justice. But there is one criminal who remains elusive, a Nazi murderess known only as "the Huntress" because she would lure Jewish children and other refugees escaping the horrors of Nazi occupation to her lakeside home in Poland and shoot them in cold blood...and she's the woman Ian wants to catch most of all because of a personal vendetta. Ian's wife Nina Markova, a former Soviet combat pilot is the only person to have escaped the Huntress' deadly grasp and wants her own revenge. Ian, Tony, and Nina team up in a riveting and suspenseful hunt that takes them from Europe to the United States as her trail suddenly goes from cold to hot. While the hunters are after their prey in the present day, Quinn also tells Nina's backstory of her time as a fighter pilot for the Russian army during WWII, the only Allied forces to have females in combat, which I found so fascinating. In fact, the incredible facts about the female Soviet combat pilots, dubbed The Night Witches by the Nazi Army because they were so terrifying, were an added bonus to the book!  In Boston, Jordan McBride is a smart, 17-year-old who wants to go to college and be a professional photographer, but her widowed father wants her to stay home, continue to work in the family antique shop, and one day run it. Their life suddenly changes after her dad meets a German refugee named Anneliese with a 4-year-old daughter, Ruth and marries her. Jordan does her best to welcome her new step-mother, especially as Anneliese is so nice and supportive of her passion for photography. Yet, there's some niggling reason Jordan just doesn't trust her stepmother, so she begins to dig into Anneliese's past by using her photography skills. The Huntress is an engrossing and at times dark cat-and-mouse thrill ride where the writing is detailed and rich with history! The mystery, perfect amount of romance, dynamic characters, skillful character development, and masterful, yet at times harrowing plot makes for a gripping and wonderful read and if you love WWII history, then I definitely recommend you read this one! **Thank you Edelweiss and William Morrow for an ARC to read and review in exchange for my fair and honest review.** *A Traveling Sisters read

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kate ☀️ Olson

    PHENOMENAL. I admit that I was a bit wary of all of the hype over this one since sometimes hype = my expectations being way too high, but in this case, I honestly don't think my expectations could have EVER reached the level of how much I love this book! Historical fiction with multiple timelines and an intricate web of suspense, THE HUNTRESS is the rare WWII novel that actually brings something new to this saturated genre and it does so in a spectacular fashion. @leighkramer and I agree that th PHENOMENAL. I admit that I was a bit wary of all of the hype over this one since sometimes hype = my expectations being way too high, but in this case, I honestly don't think my expectations could have EVER reached the level of how much I love this book! Historical fiction with multiple timelines and an intricate web of suspense, THE HUNTRESS is the rare WWII novel that actually brings something new to this saturated genre and it does so in a spectacular fashion. @leighkramer and I agree that the post-war angle as well as the inclusion of the Soviet viewpoint make this story so unique, and I really appreciate that while there is some romance in the story, the war itself and the horrors within aren't actually romanticized as they are all too often. If you love historical fiction and haven't read this yet, I can't recommend it highly enough!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    DNF @65% Based on my personal reading experience, this book feels sooo long and I’m having a very difficult time remaining invested in any of these storylines. I might pick it back up at another time but sadly it’s a DNF for now. Please note I’m in the minority here. If you’re interested in this book, check it out and I look forward to reading your thoughts!

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